Which body to complement D700


Aug 12, 2006
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#1
Would like to find out which body will complement D700? D300s, D7000 or D3S?
 

bruggink

New Member
Jul 2, 2008
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#2
Personally I would prefer D7000 because of its light weight and crop factor. Mirrorless systems are also worth consideration.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
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#3
I was gonna say "muscular" body.... :bsmilie:

What camera would be suitable as a second body?
Really depends on what the purpose of the second body is.

How about another D700? :)
 

s1221ljc

Senior Member
May 7, 2006
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#5
All matches D700, although the D300s looks/feel like the D700 & uses the same BG. For me, its the D90 becos of the video whilst IQ par with D300s. Money save in preparation for D800 :) Alternatively get the Canon S100 which is a superb counter, or complement, to the "beast" DSLR. Really, all depends on what you want to do with it.
 

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Irvine

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Jan 1, 2010
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North? South? East? West?
#6
I think the most impt factor here is the weight u r willing to carry. D700 + D300s combo is already very heavy.
 

soeypixels

Senior Member
Jun 24, 2007
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#10
if ur shooting concurrently with 2 bodies
is best to get the same camera as the buttons placement and configuration is the same
easy to work around like changing the settings while keeping the eye at the view finder

since ur using D700
getting a D300s is actually good enough if weight is not the problem
same battery, memory card, grip

i am using D700/D7000
 

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Aug 12, 2006
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#11
Thank you all for your inputs.
Mirrorless system, am already using GF1 and GH1.
Looks like it is either D3s or D300s. Really hard to decide cos D3s - low ISO capabilities and D300s - crop factor.
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
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lil red dot
#12
Thank you all for your inputs.
Mirrorless system, am already using GF1 and GH1.
Looks like it is either D3s or D300s. Really hard to decide cos D3s - low ISO capabilities and D300s - crop factor.
In the end, what do you need the 2nd body for?
 

Aug 12, 2006
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#13
More for work. Reduce the need to swap lenses and also act as back-up.
 

nickzkcin

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Dec 24, 2009
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#14
that's really not saying much...

what kind of work? your answer is like replying "to make pictures" to the question of "why do you have a camera". photography lies in such a broad spectrum and there are different specific solutions to the needs.

are you shooting weddings? birds? landscapes? architecture? studio?
 

Cowseye

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Mar 7, 2010
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#15
nickzkcin said:
that's really not saying much...

what kind of work? your answer is like replying "to make pictures" to the question of "why do you have a camera". photography lies in such a broad spectrum and there are different specific solutions to the needs.

are you shooting weddings? birds? landscapes? architecture? studio?
I'm guessing more towards event where it's more dynamic.
 

Aug 12, 2006
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0
#16
To nickzkcin and cowseye,

If it helps your inputs greatly, I am an outdoor educator, specializing in adventure, leadership and experiential camps, treks, climbings and kayaking.
At the same time, I am documenting the images from all these programmes run. Most of the time, when I am dangling 3-4 storeys high with the participants, or climbing up a mountain with a grp, the last thing on my mind is to change lens. There are other factors to focus on and I shudder at the thought of changing lens 3-4 storeys high with only a harness and ropes holding me.

Hope the description helps in your inputs.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
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#17
To nickzkcin and cowseye,

If it helps your inputs greatly, I am an outdoor educator, specializing in adventure, leadership and experiential camps, treks, climbings and kayaking.
At the same time, I am documenting the images from all these programmes run. Most of the time, when I am dangling 3-4 storeys high with the participants, or climbing up a mountain with a grp, the last thing on my mind is to change lens. There are other factors to focus on and I shudder at the thought of changing lens 3-4 storeys high with only a harness and ropes holding me.

Hope the description helps in your inputs.
Taking into consideration the situation(s) that you will be shooting in, does it make sense to be trying to carry another camera?
I would think that a single D700 with a general zoom (20+ to 70+ mm) would be sufficient? :dunno:
 

nickzkcin

New Member
Dec 24, 2009
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#18
that helps more :)

D300s for the reach. Adequately weather sealed for your activities. Alternatively, if you can wait a few months, the D400 is rumored to be announced in February. Take that with a large grain of salt however, the successor to the D700 has been talked about since the start of 2011. You probably won't need a D3s as the D700 already has pretty good high ISO performance. I don't think the mirrorless system as mentioned above would be a good fit at all. I assume you're already pretty fit considering your job, but keep in mind of the weight of a second camera. I would just stick to 1 body and a 24-70 or a 28-300

However, if you don't mind sacrificing some quality(but gain a lot in the reduced weight department), look into the Pentax Optio WG-1. This thing is pretty much a russian tank. I've seen it dropped from over 20m(while rock climbing in yosemite) and it still works perfectly. It also works underwater. The problem with this camera though is that it takes forever to reload between shots.
 

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Cowseye

Senior Member
Mar 7, 2010
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#19
Bellaraphon said:
To nickzkcin and cowseye,

If it helps your inputs greatly, I am an outdoor educator, specializing in adventure, leadership and experiential camps, treks, climbings and kayaking.
At the same time, I am documenting the images from all these programmes run. Most of the time, when I am dangling 3-4 storeys high with the participants, or climbing up a mountain with a grp, the last thing on my mind is to change lens. There are other factors to focus on and I shudder at the thought of changing lens 3-4 storeys high with only a harness and ropes holding me.

Hope the description helps in your inputs.
The first ideal camera that pops off my head is D3s. After reading thoroughly and rationalizing, I feel a cropped body D7000 suits you better.

My reasonings:
1. Weight. I think that's the last thing you want to add to your setup given your type of working environment. Any FF bodies might distract you from your main task due to the extra weight they carry.
2. Speed. To complement a slower D700, getting a faster body is ideal. D300s will do better in this field but the weight throws the idea out of the window.
3. Cropped factor - lighter weight DX lens with a longer focal length might help as a complement?
4. Price - I believe this will be one body you can afford to lose as a 2nd camera compare to another FF body.

My 2 cents worth
 

alantkh

Deregistered
Jun 16, 2009
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#20
cannot be D3s lah. It should be D800.
 

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