Which B&W film for portraits?


enivre

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Hi guys,

I seldom shoot portraits (never actually) but I'm going to do some soon for my own pre-wedding photos.

Was wondering what you B&W film you guys recommend and what film developer as well to get nice smooth tones for skin and such.

The film that I usually use is Fuji Acros 100 and Neopan 400, which I don't think is very suitable for portraits (but then again I've never really tried them).

Let me know what u think,
Thanks!
Ervine
 

Nikkornos

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Try Fuji NPH and convert to B&W digitally.

Alternatively, use Fuji either of them and orange filter. Can knock out a lot of blemish on the skin.
 

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Dream Merchant

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Depends on what sort of 'look' you prefer, and also what sort of brews you use to soup your negs.

Are you getting this shot in 120 or 4x5? :devil:
 

yamcake

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Hp5 has a good mix of grain n smooth tonality. It's look is probably closer to digital.
While tri x, which is what I usually like to use, is more classic, as in those old master documentary photographer like salgardo use tri x. Tonality is not as smooth like digital.

Recently I love the agfa apx400 with rodinal. Tonal quality is great but grain is quite pronounced. So depends your preference..
 

enivre

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Hmmm... I'm personally not into grain but I suppose it might be interesting for portraits... and I definitely don't want it to look "digital", in fact I'll be printing them in my darkroom (before I sell it off).

Good idea with the orange filter, I'll try that!

As for format, 120 lah.. 4x5 is too slow, future wife will fall asleep before I fire off the first shot! Haha! ;p
 

Nikkornos

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Try using Yellow or Orange filter. Filter is a must.

Use also Rodinal or Microdol-X with very strict temperature control.


If using 120, Rolleiflex 2.8 with Planar lens has pretty good results. Tessar 3.5 appears harsh at times.

I am getting old and have not done these things for a long while already.

Good luck.
 

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Dream Merchant

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Hmmm... I'm personally not into grain but I suppose it might be interesting for portraits... and I definitely don't want it to look "digital", in fact I'll be printing them in my darkroom (before I sell it off).

Good idea with the orange filter, I'll try that!

As for format, 120 lah.. 4x5 is too slow, future wife will fall asleep before I fire off the first shot! Haha! ;p
Tell her, with a 45, you can make her taller and slimmer looking! And without mucking around in the computer either! And borrow a speedgraphic. :sweatsm: :bsmilie:
 

yamcake

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4x5 portraiture is usually very formal and stiff, because time needed to setup and adjust etc..

i think 120 is just nice for this pre wedding thing.. haha
 

Dream Merchant

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Usually, but I think a speedgraphic might make things fast. The PJs used to use them IIRC with a 'frame rate' of about a sheet per 4-7 seconds?

But yeah, 120 would be the way to go I guess. :) There's always the Fuji GSX and Blads with the HTS adapter. :devil: :bsmilie:
 

enivre

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Thanks guys,

Will experiment with a filter first and see how things go.

Ervine
 

plsoong

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aiyah....... develope with Diafine......

heheheheh ...so tiny grains.... belly smooth .... :D


Delta?