Which AA batteries will give the most bang for your buck?


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billpepsi

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Jan 2, 2005
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#1
Interesting comparison, for sharing purpose. Anybody did compariosn for those AA recahrgeable batteries?

source: http://www.asiaone.com/Digital/Features/Story/A1Story20090320-130000.html



Alkalines, the new-fangled lithium ones or the stalwart carbon zinc batteries? Find out which will give you long lasting energy in this battery shootout. -ST

Sat, Mar 21, 2009
The Straits Times, Digital Life

by Tan Chong Yaw

Compared to old-technology carbon zinc batteries, alkalines cost about 35 cents more per battery but they pack more power and store longer.

Which will give the most bang for your buck? Alkalines, the new-fangled lithium ones or the stalwart carbon zinc batteries?

DL did a shootout of five types of batteries (See table). These range from amazingly cheap carbon zinc PenesamiG batteries to the Panasonic Evolta - a super alkaline - and Energizer e2 lithium.

In the middle are the ones that line most supermarket shelves - alkalines like the Duracell and Energizer Max.

The batteries were bought from FairPrice supermarkets except the PenesamiGs, which were bought at Sheng Siong Supermarket.

A flashlight and camera were used to test the single-use AA batteries.

The flashlight has one light-emitting diode (LED) bulb and runs on a single AA battery. The time taken from the moment the flashlight was switched on until the light died was recorded.

The test camera was Canon's PowerShot SX1 which uses four AA batteries. With the LCD switched on and flash firing for every shot, the number of shots snapped until the camera shut down on its own was noted.

Clearly at the bottom was the PenesamiG - it could not even power up the camera and lasted a paltry three minutes in the flashlight.

In the camera test, the e2 tied with the Max in being cheapest to run on a cost per photo basis. However, the e2 lasts longer than four Max batteries.

The Max and Duracell, both alkalines, tied for being most economical to run in the flashlight test.

Alkalines are best-sellers because they offer a good performance-cost balance. Alkaline batteries make up about 70 per cent of FairPrice's battery sales, said Tng Ah Yiam, its integrated purchasing director.

cytan@sph.com.sg
 

teebs

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Apr 15, 2008
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#2
Duracell batteries are pretty crap these days. They can't even last 100 shots on my Canon S3...:confused:

I find that they are about the same as those cheap alkaline batteries you get from Giant under their house brand or from Shop n Save under First Choice brand.
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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#3
PenesamiG? :bsmilie: That's a nice one... Why didn't they include "Powerbrand" as well, the el cheapo copy of Duracell? At least the PenesamiG wouldn't be alone at the bottom... Oh well, and such tests are .. somewhat entertaining, nothing more. A proper tests would also include different kind of usage, not just in a camera where nobody really knows how much power is drawn. But ok, it's just a newspaper.
I only use rechargeable batteries, they last much longer for the same amount of material and that's the environmental factor for me.
 

Dec 4, 2008
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PenesamiG? :bsmilie: That's a nice one... Why didn't they include "Powerbrand" as well, the el cheapo copy of Duracell? At least the PenesamiG wouldn't be alone at the bottom... Oh well, and such tests are .. somewhat entertaining, nothing more. A proper tests would also include different kind of usage, not just in a camera where nobody really knows how much power is drawn. But ok, it's just a newspaper.
I only use rechargeable batteries, they last much longer for the same amount of material and that's the environmental factor for me.
but charging the rechargeable is using electricity which in our local context uses natural gas and petrol to provide as well.. end up with same damage as alkaline cells... but i uses GP rechargeable and energiser rechargeable too... lol...
 

Titan10k

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May 16, 2008
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but charging the rechargeable is using electricity which in our local context uses natural gas and petrol to provide as well.. end up with same damage as alkaline cells... but i uses GP rechargeable and energiser rechargeable too... lol...
True, there's no free lunch, but the amount of "damaging" should be different. My wild guess is that alkaline cells are more "damaging" than rechargeable lithium ones.

One thing for sure is that lithium would save you lots more $$$ in the long run. I wouldn't bother alkaline for my flash, unless emergency :)
 

GavinTing

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Oct 16, 2007
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Might not be so accurate actually. They used camera with flash, but didnt mention if lighting was constant. With so many batteries to test, the ambient light may be different when they tested different batteries, so the flash has to flash more..
 

huggable

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Nov 2, 2004
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#7
Guess it's good for reading and reference. Won't take the results very seriously. As for rechargable AA batteries, there are several good reviews. Found them when I was undecided between Imedion or Enelope.
 

Blur Shadow

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Sep 17, 2005
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#8
I just read this article with mild amusement. Not exactly very scientific in the approach, but yeah, for a light user, it's still alkaline batteries for me. I don't have enough mileage to get into the long run.
 

Snoweagle

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Jan 26, 2005
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#9
I've used the Energizer Lithium before and it's really quite impressive in terms of battery life thus gets my vote. Rechargeables will be the Sanyo Eneloop.
 

Dream Merchant

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Jan 11, 2007
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Best BANG for your buck...

has surely got to be the ultra cheapo 50 pieces of AA for $2.90 at lelong stores!

When thrown into an adequetely hot fire, they still are capable of loud explosions.
 

weishengg

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Jan 6, 2008
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#11
but charging the rechargeable is using electricity which in our local context uses natural gas and petrol to provide as well.. end up with same damage as alkaline cells... but i uses GP rechargeable and energiser rechargeable too... lol...
don't really agree to this. rechargeable batteries use power direct from the Singapore power grid, which in my last known piece of information, is fired up primarily by natural gas. compared to your non-rechargeable alkaline cells, which are more likely produced and manufactured in a 3rd world country factory powered by a coal-burning power grid.
morever, you'll have to deal with the disposable issues of non-rechargeable batteries. in singapore we probably never cared too much about it, but in other countries they have a separate recycling/disposal system for batteries as they are not allowed to be disposed of in normal trash. this is an inefficient way to dispose of these waste batteries, and some of them could even have some residual power left!

yaadaa yaadaa yaadaa...


well, use rechargeable batteries! they're better for the environment! :)
 

Snoweagle

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Jan 26, 2005
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#12
Best BANG for your buck...

has surely got to be the ultra cheapo 50 pieces of AA for $2.90 at lelong stores!

When thrown into an adequetely hot fire, they still are capable of loud explosions.
I never trusted those. First they don't last and secondly, some do not have any charge inside them at all.
 

Reportage

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Nov 24, 2008
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#13
depends how much power you need.

eg, if you need extra boost of light for your flash...GP batteries.
 

3in1c

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Oct 23, 2008
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#14
depends how much power you need.

eg, if you need extra boost of light for your flash...GP batteries.
Are you referring to re-chargeable ones? I am using them just because I like their colour.
 

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