when to use iso


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kelvin7531

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Jan 5, 2009
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#1
when to use high iso.confuse about noise,thought night shoot should use the most iso?
 

subxero

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Aug 24, 2007
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#2
Higher ISO will allow you to use faster shutter, but the picture is going be noisy.

I find that its best to use tripod at night and keep the iso low.
 

Nov 18, 2008
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#3
1) When one is already limited by aperture and shutter speed
2) When one wants to create a "noisy-grainy effect" (although this may be created during post-processing)
3) Some other reasons that I'm not aware of... :cool:
 

Sep 28, 2008
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#4
iso is about how sensitive ur camera is to light. with a higher iso, ur camera will be more sensitive to light.
yes night usually uses higher iso to achieve higher shutter speed to prevent blur pictures. however higher iso will also result in noise - especially for older cameras(iso above 800-1600) - i think this is higher personal, when i was using d80 try to avoid iso above 800 cos its too noisy for me...but i have friends that would go up to 1600. now that im using d90...i think anything below 3200 is gd- perhaps my tolerance for noise has gone up...rather noise then blur pic.

concept is get ur iso at an area when u shoot and u dont get blur pics. if you are using a tripod for nightshots, who cares about iso, i set mine to the lowest possible and chitchat while my camera exposes
 

kentjr

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Apr 7, 2009
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#5
A noisy pic is easier to correct than a blurred pic.
 

kelvin7531

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#7
thanks guys for the time and tips.just 1 last question.wht situation do i use max iso 3200 on my d90?
 

deklan

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Feb 28, 2007
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#8
why dont you try and see if you like it?
 

kelvin7531

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Jan 5, 2009
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#9
okies,will try it out .once again thanks guys
 

Rashkae

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Nov 28, 2005
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#10
thanks guys for the time and tips.just 1 last question.wht situation do i use max iso 3200 on my d90?
When you're absolutely desperate to freeze motion in a pic but it's very dark and you're already at the limits of what your lens can provide in terms of light.
 

spheredome

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Jul 5, 2007
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#11
iso3200 noisy? Where got, I don't even need to think when using this setting.

Oh I forgotten, I am using a full-frame :bsmilie:
 

bomby929

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Feb 18, 2008
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#12
when to use high iso.confuse about noise,thought night shoot should use the most iso?
Its when you want to freeze motion in low light.. which means must up the shutter speed.. and the only way to do it is either open up lens aperture.. or up the ISO value.

Tripod only helps in preventing blur due to camera shake (same as Image stabilization system).. but when it comes to motion.. LL.. u have to rely on shutter speed.
 

kelvin7531

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Jan 5, 2009
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#13
thank u to all expert out there.appreciated.
 

Rashkae

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Nov 28, 2005
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#14
iso3200 noisy? Where got, I don't even need to think when using this setting.

Oh I forgotten, I am using a full-frame :bsmilie:
Full frame has nothing to do with it.
 

rendition

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Jan 26, 2008
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#16
Full frame sensor DOES have a benefit of high-ISO performance... at least from papers and pictures. Low lighting and high ISO typically means poor image quality due to digital noise and has always been the bane of digital photography, but by employing a full-frame sensor over an APS-C-sized sensor, each pixel within the sensor can be made larger to capture more light so it will need less amplification (translating to noise) to record at a particular ISO setting.

This of course doesn’t mean that a full frame camera is immune to noise problems, or that a camera with a APS-C sensor cannot produce very high quality images. All things being equal, however, you can crank the ISO up higher on a FF sensor with less fear of producing a noisy image.
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#17
when to use high iso.confuse about noise,thought night shoot should use the most iso?
depends.

if you have motion in your picture that you DON'T WANT, then bump up iso.

in general, you will only bump up iso as last resort because HIGHER ISOS will have HIGHER NOISE, and LOWER IMAGE QUALITY.

though of course, cameras with better noise control will have less trouble with this.

time to read up more on photography, sometimes people can deliberately shoot at iso3200 because they want the grain. that is of course, if your camera has nice digital grain..
 

Rashkae

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Nov 28, 2005
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#18
Full frame sensor DOES have a benefit of high-ISO performance... at least from papers and pictures. Low lighting and high ISO typically means poor image quality due to digital noise and has always been the bane of digital photography, but by employing a full-frame sensor over an APS-C-sized sensor, each pixel within the sensor can be made larger to capture more light so it will need less amplification (translating to noise) to record at a particular ISO setting.

This of course doesn’t mean that a full frame camera is immune to noise problems, or that a camera with a APS-C sensor cannot produce very high quality images. All things being equal, however, you can crank the ISO up higher on a FF sensor with less fear of producing a noisy image.
Again... Nope. it's all about pixel density.
 

bomby929

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Feb 18, 2008
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#19
Full frame sensor DOES have a benefit of high-ISO performance... at least from papers and pictures. Low lighting and high ISO typically means poor image quality due to digital noise and has always been the bane of digital photography, but by employing a full-frame sensor over an APS-C-sized sensor, each pixel within the sensor can be made larger to capture more light so it will need less amplification (translating to noise) to record at a particular ISO setting.

This of course doesn’t mean that a full frame camera is immune to noise problems, or that a camera with a APS-C sensor cannot produce very high quality images. All things being equal, however, you can crank the ISO up higher on a FF sensor with less fear of producing a noisy image.
Its pixel density... a D40 with only 6 mp also give good noise control, and it is not a Full frame camera.
 

estel

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Jul 17, 2006
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#20
All things being equal, however, you can crank the ISO up higher on a FF sensor with less fear of producing a noisy image.
all things that matter (micro lens construction, pixel size, noise reduction firmware etc that matters about noise) being equal, there's none whatsoever that makes a full frame better than a crop sensor w.r.t to noise.

Pixel density in itself isn't the final factor either. 5D II pixel density if rather high compared to older cameras.
 

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