what's the best manual setting at night?


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user111

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Jul 27, 2004
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#2
ISO 1600 f4 1second
 

#4
iso 1600? on a cam such as d70 will be super super noisy, how about, iso 600 f4 1 sec, should still be ok

Or the best thing would be to take multiple shots at different settings, then just choose the best later, play around with the iso, shutterspeed and aperture, it will give different effects
 

student

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Jul 26, 2004
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#5
ISO 50 mm rated at 25 and expose for 10-30 minutes depending on the ambient light level.
 

elfvin

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#7
wildstallion said:
iso 1600? on a cam such as d70 will be super super noisy, how about, iso 600 f4 1 sec, should still be ok

Or the best thing would be to take multiple shots at different settings, then just choose the best later, play around with the iso, shutterspeed and aperture, it will give different effects
i'm using film. haha. i have an ISO 200 film here. in campfire i think the fire would make the place look brighter. shooting people so need faster shutter. i think with flash. no choice.

student said:
ISO 50 mm rated at 25 and expose for 10-30 minutes depending on the ambient light level.
shooting people. how how! :(
 

Mezzotint

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#9
Well you can use the flashlight with camera setting to slow flash sync, so as to retain the campfire glowing efx and yr human subjects will be brighten by the flash light. Aperture at f/5.6 or f/8 should be good enuff. Can set at Aperture-priority (A) mode.

If shooting human silhouette efx without flashlight but with motion blur, use M mode with wide aperture at f/5.6 or f/8 with shutter speed set at the same value as yr aperture. For example. at f/4 shutter speed at 1/4sec or f/8 at 1/8sec.

All above mentioned methods require the use of a sturdy tripod and a cable release. Have fun! :D
 

elfvin

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#10
Mezzotint said:
Well you can use the flashlight with camera setting to slow flash sync, so as to retain the campfire glowing efx and yr human subjects will be brighten by the flash light. Aperture at f/5.6 or f/8 should be good enuff. Can set at Aperture-priority (A) mode.

If shooting human silhouette efx without flashlight but with motion blur, use M mode with wide aperture at f/5.6 or f/8 with shutter speed set at the same value as yr aperture. For example. at f/4 shutter speed at 1/4sec or f/8 at 1/8sec.

All above mentioned methods require the use of a sturdy tripod and a cable release. Have fun! :D
i think this should do the trick. thanks! ;)
 

student

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#11
elfvin said:
shooting people. how how! :(
My mistake! Last time I was in a campfire was at least a quarter century ago! Did not know you guys still do campfire! Make your own fire with the Red Indian way?

The last time I did a night scene had an exposure time of 20 minutes on a bridge with people walking around. The negative? No body on the bridge.

Mezzotint's advice is right.
 

MDZ2

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#12
Try to use the widest aperture as possible to increase speed. If the shutter is too slow eg. 5- 10 sec, you won't get the nice glow of the fire's individual tongues and instead will get a big messy ball of fire.
 

elfvin

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#13
ok. it rained last night and held indoors.

i keep using bounce flash despite quite high ceiling. with Av. is it right?

never try before leh. first time.
 

elfvin

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#14
MDZ2 said:
Try to use the widest aperture as possible to increase speed. If the shutter is too slow eg. 5- 10 sec, you won't get the nice glow of the fire's individual tongues and instead will get a big messy ball of fire.
i'll take note for the next campfire! soon i hope..
 

Mezzotint

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#15
elfvin said:
ok. it rained last night and held indoors.

i keep using bounce flash despite quite high ceiling. with Av. is it right?

never try before leh. first time.
Hi elfvin,

I know that you mentioned you are using film for the job. May I know what camera system are u using? On what film & film speed? What flashlight are u using?

A few things to aware of when taking flashlight photography, avoid shooting direct flash on objects that are near the camera as it'll result in over-exposure which in turn ruin yr whole foto image. If subject is quite far, use direct flashlight with omni-bounce diffuser by tliting the flash-head 0 degree angle. If subject is reasonably near, use a small plastic card as bounce card with flash head pointing 45degree in front, w/o diffuser.

You can shoot in 'A' mode (for yr cam & flash) to let the flash calculate how much light to fire and the camera will calculate what shutter speed to set at, in order to obtain a correct proper exposure. Beware on the shutter speed, not too slow than 1/60sec as u might capture some motion blur. A wide aperture of f/4 or f/5.6 will do. :)

Just my 2-cents worth of info. Hope it helps. Cheers mate! :D
 

elfvin

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#19
Mezzotint said:
Hi elfvin,

I know that you mentioned you are using film for the job. May I know what camera system are u using? On what film & film speed? What flashlight are u using?

A few things to aware of when taking flashlight photography, avoid shooting direct flash on objects that are near the camera as it'll result in over-exposure which in turn ruin yr whole foto image. If subject is quite far, use direct flashlight with omni-bounce diffuser by tliting the flash-head 0 degree angle. If subject is reasonably near, use a small plastic card as bounce card with flash head pointing 45degree in front, w/o diffuser.

You can shoot in 'A' mode (for yr cam & flash) to let the flash calculate how much light to fire and the camera will calculate what shutter speed to set at, in order to obtain a correct proper exposure. Beware on the shutter speed, not too slow than 1/60sec as u might capture some motion blur. A wide aperture of f/4 or f/5.6 will do. :)

Just my 2-cents worth of info. Hope it helps. Cheers mate! :D
i read the night before and i took precaution. i did quite the same as what u said. already shot and HOPE they will turn out good. :confused:

my shutter never exceeded 1/10. haha hope thats good.

and espn!? i guess i'm dumping film if i do that. haha.

thanks for the reply. i will develope it tomorrow. just finish that roll.
 

DT_

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Nov 4, 2005
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#20
that's no best setting, it should be all base on locational and wat u desire on a campfire, .. the fire? ambient lights of portraits? sillhoutte? portraits of others with background? all r of different setting..
 

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