what's metering


Status
Not open for further replies.

hanafi

New Member
Sep 8, 2004
166
0
0
#2
I generally understand metering as measuring exposure using a light meter. The light meter will give you the f-stop, ISO, shuter speed and if you do it well, you will get a perfectly exposed picture.

How? Buy a light meter... and read the manual.
 

Apr 15, 2005
470
0
16
36
Singapore
www.amerrymoment.com
#3
Metering is about measuring a scene and determining what shutter speed, aperture, etc to use loh. Not only standalone light meters, nowadays cameras all have light meters built-in mah. I believe these are called reflective light meters. While there are special light meters that measure incident light.
 

kcuf2

Senior Member
Dec 29, 2005
1,777
1
0
KFC
#4
In very basic terms:
Metering means to ensure that u properly expose ur scene. There are 3 kinds of mode (a) matrix metering (b) centre weighted (c) spot metering
(a) matrix metering - normally used in landscape photography to properly expose the whole scene, the camera will determine the light across the whole picture and try to find the best setting to properly expose everything.

(b) centre weighted - normally used in portrait setting or other scenes where there is a main object that occupies abt 70% of the picture center. The camera will try to properly expose the 70% of that picture and "ignore" the background. So for example, if ur object is black and ur background is white, the camera will meter the black object, and will try to adjust itself to bring out the black object's details. In order to do so, it got to expose more. So wat u get is a properly exposed black object against a over exposed background. Remember the background is already white, and because of the need to expose more to bring out the black details, the white background will be overexposed.
So i think u get wat i mean, the camera will only care abt the center 70%.

(c) spot metering - similar to the centre weighted metering, but just that in spot metering, we meter only a small spot eg. a 6mm diameter circle in the picture. This is used for example, when there is a small frog in a bright picture. if u use matrix metering, the camera will evaluate the whole scene and think that the whole picture is too bright, and hence under expose the picture to generate a proper exposure for the whole scene. But in doing so, the small frog may be further underexposed and become dark frog.
in addition, if u use centre weighted metering, remember it assigns abt 70% to the center of the picture, but the frog is only very very small in the picture! hence the end result will also be the camera feels that the scene is too bright and underexpose.
Thus in spot metering, u aim the center crosshair on the frog to meter the frog. This will ensure that the frog is properly exposed and be seen! but of course the background may not be properly exposed.

In apeture priority, shutter priority and program mode, u need to select ur desired metering style: (a) matrix metering (b) centre weighted (c) spot metering and then the camera will take care of the metering, thus u just concentrate on selecting the correct apeture, shutter speed or iso value/white balance to shoot ur photo.

But for manual mode:
1) Switch ur camera to manual mode
2) Select ur desired metering style: (a) matrix metering (b) centre weighted (c) spot metering
3) if using spot metering or centre weighted metering, remember to point ur centre crosshair onto ur desired object.
4) look into ur viewfinder and u will see a horizontal bar something like this + lllllll|llllll -
5) what u got to do now, is to turn ur apeture dial or ur shutter dial to make sure that the horizontal bar is centered
6) half press ur shutter release so that the exposure is locked i.e. even if u point at other places in ur scene, the metering wont change due to metering other objects.
7) frame ur photo nicely and shoot.

Hope u understand all that i just typed..have fun
 

photobum

Deregistered
Apr 17, 2005
3,068
0
0
52
#6
match80 said:
So does every cam has the metering functions?
Of course, most modern camera bodies incorporate a metering system. Unless the meter in your camera is not working (some do require battery to operate), or you have one of those really old cameras.

Metering is the vital key to properly exposed images.
 

photobum

Deregistered
Apr 17, 2005
3,068
0
0
52
#8
match80 said:
Wat abt FZ7? Does it have one? Or its an external one?
I am not sure about this camera. I believe it has one. Read your manual.
 

photobum

Deregistered
Apr 17, 2005
3,068
0
0
52
#10
ExplorerZ said:
he already said most camera have metering... unless you tell me fz7 was bought 10+yrs ago :bsmilie:
Even my 20 year-old F3 has a meter.
 

Apr 15, 2005
470
0
16
36
Singapore
www.amerrymoment.com
#11
As long as there are Auto/AP/SP/etc modes means it got metering function already. The cam need to determine the shutter speed and aperture to be truly auto mah.

So FZ7 definitely have.
 

photobum

Deregistered
Apr 17, 2005
3,068
0
0
52
#13
catchlights said:
Polaroid cameras, disposable cameras don't come with a meter.
Oh yes... some Polaroid cameras do. A Hasselblad or Mamiya with a Polaroid back. This is still consider a Polaroid camera, right?
 

Jimbo73

New Member
Sep 9, 2005
108
0
0
#15
In very basic terms:
Metering means to ensure that u properly expose ur scene. There are 3 kinds of mode (a) matrix metering (b) centre weighted (c) spot metering
(a) matrix metering - normally used in landscape photography to properly expose the whole scene, the camera will determine the light across the whole picture and try to find the best setting to properly expose everything.

(b) centre weighted - normally used in portrait setting or other scenes where there is a main object that occupies abt 70% of the picture center. The camera will try to properly expose the 70% of that picture and "ignore" the background. So for example, if ur object is black and ur background is white, the camera will meter the black object, and will try to adjust itself to bring out the black object's details. In order to do so, it got to expose more. So wat u get is a properly exposed black object against a over exposed background. Remember the background is already white, and because of the need to expose more to bring out the black details, the white background will be overexposed.
So i think u get wat i mean, the camera will only care abt the center 70%.

(c) spot metering - similar to the centre weighted metering, but just that in spot metering, we meter only a small spot eg. a 6mm diameter circle in the picture. This is used for example, when there is a small frog in a bright picture. if u use matrix metering, the camera will evaluate the whole scene and think that the whole picture is too bright, and hence under expose the picture to generate a proper exposure for the whole scene. But in doing so, the small frog may be further underexposed and become dark frog.
in addition, if u use centre weighted metering, remember it assigns abt 70% to the center of the picture, but the frog is only very very small in the picture! hence the end result will also be the camera feels that the scene is too bright and underexpose.
Thus in spot metering, u aim the center crosshair on the frog to meter the frog. This will ensure that the frog is properly exposed and be seen! but of course the background may not be properly exposed.

In apeture priority, shutter priority and program mode, u need to select ur desired metering style: (a) matrix metering (b) centre weighted (c) spot metering and then the camera will take care of the metering, thus u just concentrate on selecting the correct apeture, shutter speed or iso value/white balance to shoot ur photo.

But for manual mode:
1) Switch ur camera to manual mode
2) Select ur desired metering style: (a) matrix metering (b) centre weighted (c) spot metering
3) if using spot metering or centre weighted metering, remember to point ur centre crosshair onto ur desired object.
4) look into ur viewfinder and u will see a horizontal bar something like this + lllllll|llllll -
5) what u got to do now, is to turn ur apeture dial or ur shutter dial to make sure that the horizontal bar is centered
6) half press ur shutter release so that the exposure is locked i.e. even if u point at other places in ur scene, the metering wont change due to metering other objects.
7) frame ur photo nicely and shoot.

Hope u understand all that i just typed..have fun

Very useful info.:thumbsup:
 

Pablo

Senior Member
Sep 1, 2004
1,854
0
0
Blue/Green Planet
#19
If you want to throw your camera's metering out the door for daylight shots, use a linear polarizing filter.

If you want your camera (digital) to not throw it out the door when using a polarizing filter, make shure it is "circular polarizing type".

Learning why will give you some idea of how the DSLR does metering :)
 

STTNP

New Member
Dec 25, 2006
451
0
0
#20
can try to read from book to learn more, shoot more and read more will definitly help.
Just got a book from Kinokuniya "Exposure" BY Chris Weston worth buying
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom