What type of lens used it this shots?


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night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#2
I suppose any type of lens which can be held steady, making sure the people don't move much while the lights move. It is more of a extended exposure technique more than lens issue?!
 

night86mare

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#4
Looks to me like a slight wide angle - I base this entirely on the distortion perceived in bottom left of the series.
 

ortega

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Nov 2, 2004
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#5
Dude... first of all, please get the approval from the owner of those photos before you put them up like this. It's basic courtesy.

Secondly, try out rear-sync/slow-sync flash. This is how such effects are created. ;)

oh sorry i did not know . coz i assumed since his copyright is there i could.

i apologise. again.
after you apologise you still post the pictures again
 

zac08

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Feb 21, 2005
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#7
Yeah.. I would also assume that a wide angle is used... probably a 20mm on 35mm format. Mebbe wider
 

lsisaxon

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Nov 29, 2004
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#8
what lens u guys think was used or can be used to achieve this?
Images Used with permission from Ambrel.net by Nikola Tamindzic.
When you asked him for permission, why didn't you at the same time ask him what lens he used?
 

mysum

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Apr 18, 2006
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#10
It's definitely a wide-angle lens.

If not the moving lights (caused by 1st curtain/2nd curtain flash) then why ask such a rhetorical question?
 

xl1

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May 5, 2004
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#12
16 or 14mm, see the distortion on the edge, with a such crowded place, i don't thing more than 35mm can be shoot that wide
 

Dream Merchant

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Jan 11, 2007
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#15
On a 1.6x crop FOV camera, a 35mm lens will give you results like a 56mm lens on a 35mm of full frame camera.

Simple answer, to get those effects on your camera, use a lens that goes down to at least 15mm or 16mm. If can go down as low as 12mm, better still! Easy peasie. LOL!
 

Dream Merchant

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#17
Your camera has a 1.6x crop sensor. It's not a full frame sized sensor, so what ever lenses you choose, you must multiply the focal length to get a more accurate picture of what the field of view (FOV) of that lens is.

For example, if you choose a 35mm lens, it does NOT give you a FOV as that of a 35mm lens simply because the smaller sensor 'crops' the image by 1.6x. Put a 35mm lense on your camera and it does not give you wide angle results. Instead, it behaves like a 56mm normal lens.

Cameras with smaller (than 35mm) sensors will always have this magnification effect. Great for telephoto applications, but bad news if you need to go wide, which is why manufacturers started developing the super-wide angle lenses that go down to 10mm.

Hope this helps. Also, do a search on the internet about the basics of DSLR cameras to get a better understanding of your tools.

CHEERS!
 

Zwitter

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Mar 10, 2007
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#18
A tilt and shift lens? Or maybe perspective control lens?
First curtain flash with a very good bouncer/diffuser in very low lighting.
 

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