What to do with lens that has fungus in it?


Status
Not open for further replies.

RxXxX

New Member
Sep 10, 2006
62
0
0
#1
help i have two lens a nikon 70-210 and a canon 70-300 and they both have got fungus in it... any idea how to save them besides servicing? is it possible to manually dismantle the lens and clean it?
 

Adelfin

New Member
Dec 18, 2005
495
0
0
31
Earth
#2
i wouldn't recommend u open it... unless u're absolutely sure u know what to do... and u have a clean room to do it in... send it back... much better than screwing up and having to buy a new one...

sometimes the fungus may have stained certain elements in the lens and need to be replaced.. so doing a DIY may not solve the problem totally...
 

obewan

New Member
Feb 11, 2005
1,877
0
0
obe.homedns.org
#3
Agrees with Adelfin. Lens dismantling is not an easy task that we can DIY. :nono:
Especially, modern zoom lens are very complex devices.

Find out what is the cost of servicing and how much the lens are worth.
If it cost more than 50% of the lens price to service, then I think not worth it.
If it does not affect image quality, just use it till it failed.

Prevention is better than cure.
Keep your lens in dry cabinet when not in use.
Use your lens as often as possible.
This will prevent fungus from growing. :)
 

mcn

New Member
Oct 6, 2005
1,265
0
0
#7
you can sell them off at a rediculously cheap price and up your itrader count


help i have two lens a nikon 70-210 and a canon 70-300 and they both have got fungus in it... any idea how to save them besides servicing? is it possible to manually dismantle the lens and clean it?
 

RxXxX

New Member
Sep 10, 2006
62
0
0
#8
thx alot will consider sending for service
 

Mar 10, 2007
177
0
0
Yishun
#9
sori for being extra here but i tot oni dust gets into the lens easily?:(
 

Adelfin

New Member
Dec 18, 2005
495
0
0
31
Earth
#10
sori for being extra here but i tot oni dust gets into the lens easily?:(
if u open it.. definitely.. but if u have access to a clean room.. like one where people do lab tests or assemble watches... then there will be negligible amounts of dust.. even then, most people dunno how to clean or assemble it back afterwards..
 

jnet6

Senior Member
Apr 21, 2004
8,179
0
36
not here often anymore
#12
May i know what will you do when you see lump on your hand?

besides going to doctor for examination and extract it out, will you do it yourself?
 

sykestang

Senior Member
Jan 18, 2003
5,550
0
36
45
studiospace
sykestang.clubsnap.org
#15
Jnet6 said:
May i know what will you do when you see lump on your hand?

besides going to doctor for examination and extract it out, will you do it yourself?
Jnet6 said:
That means you don't treat the lens like yr own personal tools.
See... another of your 'classic' reply :rolleyes: ... I really don't want to go after you but I just can't help it after reading your replies and you are asking for a hard slap! ;(

Humble is a virtue!!!

For the Thread Starter:
Do not try to open the lens to clean yourself. This is because you may lose the focusing and calibration after opening the lens. Lenses may look easy to open twitching the 2 notch to unscrew the elements out. However you'd never be able to screw them back to the right position and ultimately off calibrate the focusing.

If the fungus is not too much, ie big patches, you can send the lenses for professional cleaning. Recommended is to send them back to the original manufacturer for the most trusted service. Prices defer from the different lens models. You may send it in or call them for a quotation for general servicing price. However if the final result to be expensive and budget is a constraint, you can try the Camera Hospital, contact: Steven. He is located at SunShine Plaza. A lot of oldbies send their camera equipment for him to service and so far he can be trusted.

On the other hand, if the fungus has glown too big a patch, I do not recommend you to send in for cleaning. Reasons being even after cleaning, the patch where the fungus glow may have already 'eaten' the coating. And frankly speaking, the only way to salvage this lens is to change the affected elements. This will cost a bomb and not worth it. You'd better off be buying a brand new replacment lens. :(

Hope this info helps. :)
 

jnet6

Senior Member
Apr 21, 2004
8,179
0
36
not here often anymore
#16
See... another of your 'classic' reply :rolleyes: ... I really don't want to go after you but I just can't help it after reading your replies and you are asking for a hard slap! ;(

Humble is a virtue!!!

For the Thread Starter:
Do not try to open the lens to clean yourself. This is because you may lose the focusing and calibration after opening the lens. Lenses may look easy to open twitching the 2 notch to unscrew the elements out. However you'd never be able to screw them back to the right position and ultimately off calibrate the focusing.

If the fungus is not too much, ie big patches, you can send the lenses for professional cleaning. Recommended is to send them back to the original manufacturer for the most trusted service. Prices defer from the different lens models. You may send it in or call them for a quotation for general servicing price. However if the final result to be expensive and budget is a constraint, you can try the Camera Hospital, contact: Steven. He is located at SunShine Plaza. A lot of oldbies send their camera equipment for him to service and so far he can be trusted.

On the other hand, if the fungus has glown too big a patch, I do not recommend you to send in for cleaning. Reasons being even after cleaning, the patch where the fungus glow may have already 'eaten' the coating. And frankly speaking, the only way to salvage this lens is to change the affected elements. This will cost a bomb and not worth it. You'd better off be buying a brand new replacment lens. :(

Hope this info helps. :)
Thank you very much. :)
At least i've let a man with a good knowledge (or better knowledgde then me) to explain what to do with a lens that has fungus.
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom