What is the good lens for portraits...?


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vito

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Apr 21, 2006
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#1
Any recomend lens for portrait shot ...? how many mm ..? thank's
 

vito

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Apr 21, 2006
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#3
How about Tamron AF90mm F/2.8 is good for portraits..? Thank's
 

zcf

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Apr 10, 2005
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270 degree of Singapore
#4
Tamron Macro lens is good also, but some complain it's too sharp instead :sweat:

But its f/2.8 lose out in term of bokeh to the 50mm or 85mm of f/1.4-1.8.
 

Daniz

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Aug 10, 2006
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Sing a pore
#5
Actually any lens is good for portraits, it's how you get your shot that is important. Some people swear by primes like the 50 1.8, 85 1.2, others use the 70-200mm 2.8 IS or even the 300mm. Check out John Tan's shot and you will know how good the 300mm is for portraits. :bigeyes:
 

Eric Lee

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Sep 11, 2004
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#6
vito said:
How about Tamron AF90mm F/2.8 is good for portraits..? Thank's
The focusing search time takes too long.. unless you are doing a 1 on 1 with the model.

Almost all lens can be a portrait lens. Telephoto lens are the ones to look at. :)

And this is the wrong subforum to post this question.
 

Stratix

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Oct 13, 2005
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#7
try wide angle for model shoots. something between 15 to 30mm haha =)
 

#9
Daniz said:
Actually any lens is good for portraits, it's how you get your shot that is important. Some people swear by primes like the 50 1.8, 85 1.2, others use the 70-200mm 2.8 IS or even the 300mm. Check out John Tan's shot and you will know how good the 300mm is for portraits. :bigeyes:
i'd agree that any lens is good for portraits. the only difference is the distance you have to stand from the subject, and AF hunting/ MF time, plus bg/ bokeh. in some cases like old folks or animals you'd better use 300mm or even more for the portraits :bsmilie: i did a shoot for many babies over the weekend, even with 100mm i thought i was too close, pity the room was too small else i'd have gone out further and used 300mm.
 

Artosoft

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Aug 31, 2005
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#10
What camera? dSLR or film SLR? I mean with crop factor or not?

If no crop factor (film SLR or some full size sensor dSLR), 135mm. If dSLR with around 1.5-2x crop factor, 85mm is good.

Regards,
Arto.
 

Apr 30, 2006
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#12
What you are looking for is the THE GOOD lens (in whosoever's opinion that comes along) that is best for protraying the portraits you want to frame.

What others are suggesting are through their knowledge and experience are their favourite focal lengths e.g 50mm, 85mm 70-200mm. Lenses from wide angles to human vision equilivant to tele/super tele have all been used for such a named purpose. This is because the photographer thinks that a particular lens they have chosen it is most suitable for the kind of portraiture they want to take, that is, their style.

But it really depends on what kind of effect you are looking for. That being said, there are many lenses that can take good portraits, and many good lenses for portraits, but it boils down to what the photographer wants, really.:)

So, go try them all.
 

vito

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Apr 21, 2006
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#13
Eric Lee said:
The focusing search time takes too long.. unless you are doing a 1 on 1 with the model.

Almost all lens can be a portrait lens. Telephoto lens are the ones to look at. :)

And this is the wrong subforum to post this question.
So IF 1 model with 10 fotographers ..which lens u suggest ..? thank's
 

unseen

Senior Member
Dec 14, 2004
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#14
vito said:
So IF 1 model with 10 fotographers ..which lens u suggest ..? thank's
I'd suggest drop out of the shoot. You won't be able to get good photos anyway.
 

Eric Lee

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Sep 11, 2004
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#15
vito said:
So IF 1 model with 10 fotographers ..which lens u suggest ..? thank's
I think you stop shooting and just go for a cuppa coffee :bsmilie:

Hard to pose a model, hard to select a location for model and hard to get eye contact for model.... :bsmilie:

Ok seriously.... as said by others... most lenses can be portraiture lenses... its the composition....

For a nice brokeh...lenses with telephoto and big aperatures can give u very nice brokeh and sharp subject....

For me, my setup is:
5 Photogs or less (Primes) : 35 f2 (full body) / 85 f1.4 (head and shoulders)
6 Photogs or more (Zooms): 28-70 (Almost full body) / 70-200 (Head and shoulders)

This just my opinion.... hehe...
 

vito

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Apr 21, 2006
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#16
Eric Lee said:
I think you stop shooting and just go for a cuppa coffee :bsmilie:

Hard to pose a model, hard to select a location for model and hard to get eye contact for model.... :bsmilie:

Ok seriously.... as said by others... most lenses can be portraiture lenses... its the composition....

For a nice brokeh...lenses with telephoto and big aperatures can give u very nice brokeh and sharp subject....

For me, my setup is:
5 Photogs or less (Primes) : 35 f2 (full body) / 85 f1.4 (head and shoulders)
6 Photogs or more (Zooms): 28-70 (Almost full body) / 70-200 (Head and shoulders)

This just my opinion.... hehe...
So does it means I have to buy at least 4 lens ...? thank's
 

Eric Lee

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Sep 11, 2004
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#17
vito said:
So does it means I have to buy at least 4 lens ...? thank's
Its entirely up to you. I think the best soln is you rent some lenses to try see which lens you are comfortable with. A general guideline is 2 lenses.... one for full body and one for closeups.... or just one lens.... the 18-200 VR...:)

Hope this helps :)
 

Apr 2, 2006
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CCK
#18
Considerations:

1. Bokeh - the lens should render OOF (out of focus) areas in a pleasant fashion.
2. Working distance and perspective. With crop factor, 35mm is roughly equal to 50mm FF, three quarter to half body; 50mm roughly equal to 75mm-80mm FF close enough to traditional 85mm FF, slightly tighter shot, half body to head; 85mm roughly 125mm FF, head and shoulder. Any longer you'll have to shout your posing instructions.
3. Max aperture for that shallow DOF (depth of field). That's where zoom lose out.

If you're really keen on portraiture as a specialty interest, start with 50mm, very cheap, and f1.8 easily, f1.4 also not expensive. Add 85mmf1.8 if you like. These 2 would be your primary portraiture lenses. Get a 35mm f2 if fund is not an issue.

I've used 50mm f1.4 on FF (film) effectively, along with 85mm f1.8 and 105f2.5 (AIS, manual). I like the 180mmf2.8 as well, a bit tougher for use, but imho cannot be the primary portrait lens (even during the FF days, now even tougher as it is equivalent of 250mm). I love the perspective of 300mm but found it so difficult to use. I think those pro photographer uses walkie talkie and have someone directing the posing, he shots from a far (and very far). I have a 400mm f5.6 but had never shot a single portrait shot on it. Did a couple of 500mm f8 (borrowed lens) shots, nice but gimmicky (OOF donuts).

Having said that, you get that special-look on your shots if you can use lenses that are 180mm and beyond.

But my favourite (then during FF days) was 105mm f2.5, now on crop sensor AF85mm f1.8, but the AF50mm f1.8 (sold it some years ago) and AF50mm f1.4 were never far off. I also pack my AF35mm f2 as it is an extremely sharp lens.

Oh - and the Nikon soft 1 if you want the soft focus look.

My 2c.
 

vito

New Member
Apr 21, 2006
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#19
diediealsomustdive said:
Considerations:

1. Bokeh - the lens should render OOF (out of focus) areas in a pleasant fashion.
2. Working distance and perspective. With crop factor, 35mm is roughly equal to 50mm FF, three quarter to half body; 50mm roughly equal to 75mm-80mm FF close enough to traditional 85mm FF, slightly tighter shot, half body to head; 85mm roughly 125mm FF, head and shoulder. Any longer you'll have to shout your posing instructions.
3. Max aperture for that shallow DOF (depth of field). That's where zoom lose out.

If you're really keen on portraiture as a specialty interest, start with 50mm, very cheap, and f1.8 easily, f1.4 also not expensive. Add 85mmf1.8 if you like. These 2 would be your primary portraiture lenses. Get a 35mm f2 if fund is not an issue.

I've used 50mm f1.4 on FF (film) effectively, along with 85mm f1.8 and 105f2.5 (AIS, manual). I like the 180mmf2.8 as well, a bit tougher for use, but imho cannot be the primary portrait lens (even during the FF days, now even tougher as it is equivalent of 250mm). I love the perspective of 300mm but found it so difficult to use. I think those pro photographer uses walkie talkie and have someone directing the posing, he shots from a far (and very far). I have a 400mm f5.6 but had never shot a single portrait shot on it. Did a couple of 500mm f8 (borrowed lens) shots, nice but gimmicky (OOF donuts).

Having said that, you get that special-look on your shots if you can use lenses that are 180mm and beyond.

But my favourite (then during FF days) was 105mm f2.5, now on crop sensor AF85mm f1.8, but the AF50mm f1.8 (sold it some years ago) and AF50mm f1.4 were never far off. I also pack my AF35mm f2 as it is an extremely sharp lens.

Oh - and the Nikon soft 1 if you want the soft focus look.

My 2c.
Thank's Bro it's really help me to decide ...now I have the Tamron AF90 ...so do you think I should buy another lens for my portrait shot ...? just for the start ...
 

Apr 2, 2006
2,308
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CCK
#20
Tamron AF90
- focal length about right
- max aperture f2.8 maybe DOF not shallow enough

Take it out and shot some photos, see the results. If you have fren, beg, borrow but don't steal a Nikkor or Canon or Minolta (depending on your camera make) AF85f1.8. Compare...

I think you would end up using your AF90 strictly for Macro shots, and opting for the 85/1.8 for portraiture.

I may be wrong, though, have not used the Tamron AF90...

Others may be able to help.;)
 

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