What is the Difference in Lenses?


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elutris

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Hi,

Does anyone know where I can find out more about the different lens and terms to do with lenses for Nikon bodies?

For example, what's the difference between D and Non D, G and Non G, Nikkor and Nikon, and other terms I should know about. For example, if AF is Auto Focus, what is AFS?

I am planning to get another lens for my F80D and am thinking about the 80mm-200mm/F2.8 lens. Does anyone know the estimated pricing of this lens?
 

ckiang

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Originally posted by elutris
Hi,

Does anyone know where I can find out more about the different lens and terms to do with lenses for Nikon bodies?

For example, what's the difference between D and Non D, G and Non G, Nikkor and Nikon, and other terms I should know about. For example, if AF is Auto Focus, what is AFS?

I am planning to get another lens for my F80D and am thinking about the 80mm-200mm/F2.8 lens. Does anyone know the estimated pricing of this lens?
Nikon's lenses are called Nikkor. There is no Nikon lens.

Lenses with the D designation means that the lens will transmit distance information to the camera, to be used for flash metering and the like. Non-D lenses does not do this.

G lenses are the cheaper lenses without the aperture ring. These cannot be used on older bodies which does not allow aperture changes from the body itself (e.g. F90X, the manual bodies etc).

AF-S lenses have a "Silent Wave" motor inside the lens (like Canon USM) which lets them focus much faster and quieter compared to the non-AFS lenses. AF-S lenses are also much more expensive.

The Nikkor AF 80-200mm f/2.8D ED costs around $1650. The AF-S version of the same lens costs about $2800.

Regards
CK
 

Ian

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Feb 20, 2002
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Originally posted by ckiang


Nikon's lenses are called Nikkor. There is no Nikon lens.

(snipped)

Regards
CK
Erm not quite true CK!

Series E lenses were termed "Nikon Lens, Series E" by Nikon to indicate they were of a lower standard than the regular Nikkor line and were never designated as a Nikkor Lens.
 

J

JerChan

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Originally posted by Ian


Erm not quite true CK!

Series E lenses were termed "Nikon Lens, Series E" by Nikon to indicate they were of a lower standard than the regular Nikkor line and were never designated as a Nikkor Lens.
So, what is an E lense?

By the way, I notice that some camera lenses are VERY expensive. Is there a reason? It still looks like a normal lense to me unless it is a telephoto.
 

ckiang

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Originally posted by Ian


Erm not quite true CK!

Series E lenses were termed "Nikon Lens, Series E" by Nikon to indicate they were of a lower standard than the regular Nikkor line and were never designated as a Nikkor Lens.
Oops! My bad. :embrass:

Regards
CK
 

ckiang

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Originally posted by JerChan


So, what is an E lense?

By the way, I notice that some camera lenses are VERY expensive. Is there a reason? It still looks like a normal lense to me unless it is a telephoto.
The quality of the glass and the construction plays a part. Superwides and superteles are VERY expensive.

Regards
CK
 

Ian

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Feb 20, 2002
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Originally posted by JerChan


So, what is an E lense?

By the way, I notice that some camera lenses are VERY expensive. Is there a reason? It still looks like a normal lense to me unless it is a telephoto.
Nikon series E lenses were introduced by Nikon back in 1979 to accompany the then newly released Nikon EM body. The lenses were consumer grade versons of the more expensive Nikkors and were smaller, lighter and used plastic for their bodies rather than metal.

Ultra wide angle lenses that are fast (eg f2.8 or faster) are horribly hard to design and produce, especially if a high quality image is to be produced that is free from abberations such as colour fringing, ghosting and coma. Such lenses reqire very precise manufacturing and long and expensive development times. Hence the expense.

Large telephoto lenses cost even more to produce due to the relatively small sales market, size of the optics required, tooling costs and cost of manufacturing and development.
 

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