what filter to use to get deep blue sky?


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ahbeng

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#1
what type of filter should i use to get deep blue sky picture?
 

zac08

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Feb 21, 2005
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#3
Try a red filter... ;) ;)
 

catchlights

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#4
you want really deep blue sky on any given day, try 80A,
other alternative are blue gradual filter. Hoya pop blue filters.

you want blue sky on sunny day, try Circular Polarizer.
 

XC Pictorial

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#5
CPL is useful.. i own them in 52,62,67,77mm.. sometime troublesome to carry all.

But for CPL to work the sky must be at least abit blue to begin with.

for landscape i usually use gradual filters..

Some test shots..







I think i still have some TianYa ones left from last sale..
 

user111

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Jul 27, 2004
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#7
red filter is for black n white photos. will make the sky look darker in the black n white photo.
 

student

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Jul 26, 2004
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#9
I just want to point out that if you have a white washed sky, nothing will help.
Well, perhaps a graduated blue filter (as pointed out by catchlights) might just do the trick!
 

student

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If you insist........ by all means.
I do not. I do not use one at all.

For those who insist, it can sometimes help in such "nothing will help" sitiations.

Just clarifying that there may be possible solutions to the "nothing will help" situations.
 

Kit

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#12
No problem. Personally, a blue filter won't cut it. I would imagine the TS has landscape or architectural stuff in mind (I might be off). In that case, nothing beats knowing the light well and identifying a good time to shoot. The subjects are always there, so I plan for it.
 

Jeff

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#14
what type of filter should i use to get deep blue sky picture?
filterless. in adobe lightroom, u can tune the vibrance w/o clipping e 8bit RGB. save some $ this way.

alternatively, the cir pol also serves as a neutral density filter for lower shutter speed at 0.
 

student

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No problem. Personally, a blue filter won't cut it. I would imagine the TS has landscape or architectural stuff in mind (I might be off). In that case, nothing beats knowing the light well and identifying a good time to shoot. The subjects are always there, so I plan for it.
Of course you are absolutely correct. The best is to make such photographs in the right time.

And the graduated blue filter will not work well in a situation where there are protruding structures to the sky, such as steep mountains or high buildings. I suppose it might work to some extent (if one insists) in a situation where there is a relatively "even" horizon.
 

HVB88

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#17
Can use Gradual ND also...
 

theRBK

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#19
My method to get blue sky is simply simple. I will meter the sky and shoot the shot. I will get underexposed foreground. I use photoshop to adjust the foreground to balance the exposure.
that's what I do sometimes too...although, sometimes if the contrast is too high I might increase exposure abit so the stuff on the ground doesn't become too murky...
 

megaweb

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#20
that's what I do sometimes too...although, sometimes if the contrast is too high I might increase exposure abit so the stuff on the ground doesn't become too murky...
Agree with you. But if contrast too high, use any filter also encounter same problem. Best is shoot during morning and late afternoon :)
 

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