What do you call this kind of film?


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thirtyone

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Dec 13, 2008
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I've ever seen photos printed out in this manner.. Not referring to the black & white color but the corners of the photo. Anybody out there knows what's the name of this kind of development of photos? or the specific place to have this kind of photos developed? Thanks! :)
 

night86mare

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#3
it is just addition of border........ you can do it yourself and tell the lab not to touch it.
 

mykelism

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Not sure what film is that, but if you're asking how the dark border is achieved:

When you scan the 120 film, just include the film border in the process. Most labs leave it out and give you a perfect square (6 by 6 image). If you looked at your developed negatives/slides, there are also numbers and markings to denote the film type, like RVP for Velvia, EBX for Elitechrome Xtra, etc.

Quite a common thing to do these days as it adds some filmic authenticity to the shot, but can be gimicky if overdone.
 

thirtyone

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Dec 13, 2008
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Not sure what film is that, but if you're asking how the dark border is achieved:

When you scan the 120 film, just include the film border in the process. Most labs leave it out and give you a perfect square (6 by 6 image). If you looked at your developed negatives/slides, there are also numbers and markings to denote the film type, like RVP for Velvia, EBX for Elitechrome Xtra, etc.

Quite a common thing to do these days as it adds some filmic authenticity to the shot, but can be gimicky if overdone.

Which means I can't seem to achieve such results using my digital cam? :(
 

sebianos

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#10
If this is post-processed then it's like night86mare said - a border that's digitally added.

Otherwise, it's a medium-format film - scanned with border. ;)

As for printing, can always post-process with this effect. Then print from the scan but ask the photolab to leave in the border. That's about it.
 

mykelism

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Which means I can't seem to achieve such results using my digital cam? :(
Well, you can try to mimic the look by PPing it in =)

Looking at the shot again, it is quite likely that this is a film shot, judging by the curved border on the top and bottom right corners of the shot. This is because the film mask on medium format cameras usually have some kinks/curves.

It would be quite tedious to PP that in just for a "filmic" effect.
 

ed9119

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#14
I cannot believe some of the replies I'm reading above.....its like we dug up an archeological artefact..... we're talking about Fuji NP400PR ....... otherwise known as Neopan 400 Professional a negative film that is known for its fine grain at that ISO that is normally pushed or pulled (aka shot at) between 200 through 3200

The number 566 is the emulsion number ....'AABOEG' is the production batch number (if I remember correctly)

How to get this effect? Its likely part of a contact sheet...The negative was printed in whole including the sides/edges ..... there are NO sprocket holes :bsmilie: .... this sample shown is from 120 film and apparently in 6x6 format

I used to really like this when paired with a Green-Yellow filter
 

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#15
I cannot believe some of the replies I'm reading above.....its like we dug up an archeological artefact..... we're talking about Fuji NP400PR ....... otherwise known as Neopan 400 Professional a negative film that is known for its fine grain at that ISO that is normally pushed or pulled (aka shot at) between 200 through 3200

The number 566 is the emulsion number ....'AABOEG' is the production batch number (if I remember correctly)

How to get this effect? Its likely part of a contact sheet...The negative was printed in whole including the sides/edges ..... there are NO sprocket holes :bsmilie: .... this sample shown is from 120 film and apparently in 6x6 format

I used to really like this when paired with a Green-Yellow filter
AGREE AGREE!!! LOL!!! I love the Neopan and still shoot Neopan today on 35mm. Time to dig out my 66 Bronica SQA and load a roll of Neopan400 in it! Hahaha.... :bsmilie:
 

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