What cheap combination gets the largest magnification ratio?


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dRebelXT

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May 14, 2005
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#1
I have macro lens and close ups, but none gets larger than 2:1. What else can I use to
shoot subjects smaller than 1cm? :confused:
 

justarius

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Nov 9, 2003
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#2
try stacking closeup filter on top of a macro lens, couple with extension tube and a teleconvertor. Tried it before, can see individual ink dots on printed paper.;)

Or alternatively, get a bellows or tried mounting reverse mounting a lens (though not too sure how big it can go.)
 

Snoweagle

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Jan 26, 2005
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#3
justarius said:
try stacking closeup filter on top of a macro lens, couple with extension tube and a teleconvertor. Tried it before, can see individual ink dots on printed paper.;)

Or alternatively, get a bellows or tried mounting reverse mounting a lens (though not too sure how big it can go.)
Extension tubes and teleconverters are not that cheap. Reverse macro is the best solution.
 

dRebelXT

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#5
justarius said:
try stacking closeup filter on top of a macro lens, couple with extension tube and a teleconvertor. Tried it before, can see individual ink dots on printed paper.;)

Or alternatively, get a bellows or tried mounting reverse mounting a lens (though not too sure how big it can go.)
That's how I reached 2:1. I stacked en ET25mm, Tamron 90 macro and Raynox DCR250.
Maximim width to fit in my 350D frame is 1.3cm, nearly 2:1 I guess. ;) I need more mag
ratios since I was always fascinated by people shooting spiders and tiny insects. ;p Plus
can not afford EF 65mm 1:1-5.
 

ExplorerZ

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#6
cheapest way should be to use ur existing gear and set up reverse macro like most of them said. but your working distance will be quite bad for 'live' subject macro.

simple + cheap setup would be a 50mm f1.8 + 70-300 maybe(vignetting will occur at <200mm or so)

best bet will be to go for a macro lens that do 1:1 + the crop factor of camera it will be 1.5:1 i guess :dunno:. do some cropping and it should do, this way you got more working distance so as to not scared away the spider and insect

That's how I reached 2:1. I stacked en ET25mm, Tamron 90 macro and Raynox DCR250.
Maximim width to fit in my 350D frame is 1.3cm, nearly 2:1 I guess. I need more mag
ratios since I was always fascinated by people shooting spiders and tiny insects. Plus
can not afford EF 65mm 1:1-5.
btw it is 1:2 not 2:1 if 1.3cm is enuff to fit a 2.6cm ccd/cmos
 

Snoweagle

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#10
Artosoft said:
Dioptre = 1m / 50mm ==> 100cm / 5cm = +20.

Regards,
Arto.
Hmmm...thanks for that.

Do u know how much magnification (as in 1:2, etc) do i get cos i add two +4 close up filters on my 50mm, which makes it +8?
 

DeSwitch

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#11


Yr Tamron 90mm and yr 350D will do the trick as what I had achieved in above photo of a flying hoverfly (less than 1cm long). adding close-up will greatly reduce image quility as I had learnt the hard $$ way.

If yr subject is stationary, reverse mount a 50mm lens will be great but working distance is very short.
 

ortega

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Nov 2, 2004
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#12
1:1 magnification can shoot insects already what

want bigger then add extension tube, 2x teleconverter loh
or the cheapest way is to crop your image
 

Artosoft

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Aug 31, 2005
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#13
ortega said:
1:1 magnification can shoot insects already what

want bigger then add extension tube, 2x teleconverter loh
or the cheapest way is to crop your image
Or like last time, find a bigger insect :sweat: .

Regards,
Arto.
 

zac08

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Feb 21, 2005
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#14
Artosoft said:
Or like last time, find a bigger insect :sweat: .

Regards,
Arto.
Problem is some of the really tiny insects are really beautiful...
 

dRebelXT

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May 14, 2005
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#15
zac08 said:
Problem is some of the really tiny insects are really beautiful...
true, jumping spiders for example.
 

dRebelXT

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May 14, 2005
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#16
DeSwitch said:


Yr Tamron 90mm and yr 350D will do the trick as what I had achieved in above photo of a flying hoverfly (less than 1cm long). adding close-up will greatly reduce image quility as I had learnt the hard $$ way.

If yr subject is stationary, reverse mount a 50mm lens will be great but working distance is very short.
wah, that's a nice catch. did you shoot hovering bee also?
 

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