Wedding Photography


Jopjop

New Member
Aug 15, 2013
13
0
1
Singapore
#1
Hi,

I just started wedding photography as a second photographer. Everything was fine during the morning. Just encounter some problem during the night group shots. During the table by table group shot, some of the people is out of focus. I came to realise that I should have used a higher aperture stop in order to focus more. But, should I use aperture priority with flash or shutter speed with flash? Thank you!
 

paulboh87

New Member
Dec 23, 2012
107
0
0
30
singapore
#2
aperture affects flash, shutter affect background light and motion speed.

Small aperture means less light going into lens, which means stronger flash power
big aperture means more light going into lens, which means less flash power needed.

slow shutter speed means allowing more light to enter sensor, thus bringing up overall light. but also means more prone to blur from handshake and motion blur.

Since this is just a wedding shoot, stay around 1/50 shutter if your using wide angle - standard.
If u want everybody to be more focus than u need to either up your aperture till f4.5 maybe? or you need to find ways to assist your camera's AF system to focus better. Maybe too dark for AF to work?

maybe show us 1 sample of the pic with focus problem and the settings so we can better understand the sitaution

hope that helps you.
 

one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
820
12
18
#3
Hi,

I just started wedding photography as a second photographer. Everything was fine during the morning. Just encounter some problem during the night group shots. During the table by table group shot, some of the people is out of focus. I came to realise that I should have used a higher aperture stop in order to focus more. But, should I use aperture priority with flash or shutter speed with flash? Thank you!
There are two issues here,auto focussing mode,that is choose one that can give overall sharpness over wider area of frame.It can be single or multi spot.This because of dim lighting so depending on what camera or it's focusing ability.It is also dependent on focal length of lens used.

Second,yes use smaller F-stop meaning bigger number to increase DOF( depth of field )but this can be a problem with using a less powerful flash meaning smaller flash guide number ( limited F- stops ) as a bigger more powerful flash has more light output so can use more apertures ( F-stops ) to control output.Hope this helps clear your confusion. :)
 

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one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
820
12
18
#4
aperture affects flash, shutter affect background light and motion speed.

Small aperture means less light going into lens, which means stronger flash power
big aperture means more light going into lens, which means less flash power needed.

slow shutter speed means allowing more light to enter sensor, thus bringing up overall light. but also means more prone to blur from handshake and motion blur.

Since this is just a wedding shoot, stay around 1/50 shutter if your using wide angle - standard.
If u want everybody to be more focus than u need to either up your aperture till f4.5 maybe? or you need to find ways to assist your camera's AF system to focus better. Maybe too dark for AF to work?

maybe show us 1 sample of the pic with focus problem and the settings so we can better understand the sitaution

hope that helps you.
I think you got the flash part wrong.Do you know how fast the speed of light is?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_light

Speed of light is slightly over 299 million meters/sec or 186000 miles/sec.Yes faster than a speeding bullet and that's how it is captured photographically by flash light.So have nothing to do with motion blur.

Shutter speed here refers to synchronising speed of flash with shutter as focal plane type shutter is slow and most digital DSLR synchronise at 160th, 200/250th. sec or higher.That is it allow the shutter and flash to fire at the same time or else you get partial exposure due to slow shutter or before it finishes travelling across the picture frame.

Of course flash can synchronise at slower speed below the camera's sync speed.Then you have to account for ambient lighting.
 

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catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
21,903
46
48
Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#5
Hi,

I just started wedding photography as a second photographer. Everything was fine during the morning. Just encounter some problem during the night group shots. During the table by table group shot, some of the people is out of focus. I came to realise that I should have used a higher aperture stop in order to focus more. But, should I use aperture priority with flash or shutter speed with flash? Thank you!
short answer for table shots: shoot at f5.6 or f8 depends on DX or FX bodies, keep your shutter speed at 1/60 s, manual exposure mode, always pay attention the ambient light, you can up your ISO till the ambient light two stops below your flash exposure. Hardly anyone print larger than 4R photo for table shot, so just up your ISO accordingly.

and the most importantly, please build the foundation on basic photography before going around offer your service, you are hired to solve problems, not to create some.
 

Edwin Francis

Senior Member
Mar 24, 2006
883
3
18
www.sgwriter.com
#6
Have to agree with Catchlights. I'd either use manual or aperture priority (shutter speed locked between 1/60 and 1/250)depending on the situation. But that's not the important issue.
You seem to be lacking a basic knowledge and control of depth of field and/or where to focus. Hired 2nd shooters are expected to at least have the basic technical aspects down. Perhaps not the people-handling skills and situational awareness yet.
Perhaps you were not hired, but an unofficial 2nd shooter for a friend? Even then, it means wasting everyone's time, and disappointed guests if you don't get the basic shot.
 

huatman

Senior Member
Nov 27, 2010
2,550
3
38
East
phleephoto.com
#7
Normally for most indoor group shot will go around 1/60 shutter speed, aperture f/5.6 & above. (with flash). Indoor normally will use manual mode. Different situation need to be change accordion, if ur camera has custom mode, preset few mode setting so can switch setting quicker.
Request to have lighting of room on (if possible) if it not for table shot.
Up the iso according if needed to get right exposure. As catchlight mentioned, hardly ppl print larger than 4R for table shot, so can pump iso higher (800, 1600 etc).

Try do a quick test shot 1st & get at least 2 or more shot for each table. Often it the guest closing their eyes, look away etc that ruin the shots.
 

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paulboh87

New Member
Dec 23, 2012
107
0
0
30
singapore
#8
I think you got the flash part wrong.Do you know how fast the speed of light is?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_light

Speed of light is slightly over 299 million meters/sec or 186000 miles/sec.Yes faster than a speeding bullet and that's how it is captured photographically by flash light.So have nothing to do with motion blur.

Shutter speed here refers to synchronising speed of flash with shutter as focal plane type shutter is slow and most digital DSLR synchronise at 160th, 200/250th. sec or higher.That is it allow the shutter and flash to fire at the same time or else you get partial exposure due to slow shutter or before it finishes travelling across the picture frame.

Of course flash can synchronise at slower speed below the camera's sync speed.Then you have to account for ambient lighting.
i was refering to motion blur on the moving subjects in the pic will occur if shutter speed is slow.
 

sjackal

Senior Member
Jul 9, 2008
4,491
10
38
#9
please build the foundation on basic photography before going around offer your service, you are hired to solve problems, not to create some.
Agreed. Bare basics.
 

sjackal

Senior Member
Jul 9, 2008
4,491
10
38
#10
i was refering to motion blur on the moving subjects in the pic will occur if shutter speed is slow.
Yes, you are right. The flash may 'freeze' and expose the shot properly, but a slow shutter speed still will drag in too much ambient and cause blur nonetheless. Even at 1/60 on a wide angle, if there is camera shakes, it will still cause blur.
 

Blur Shadow

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2005
4,886
4
0
#11
You can use any mode (Manual, aperture priority, shutter priority etc.) as long as you are able to maintain the depth of field, shutter speed and overall exposure that you need.

As mentioned earlier, most wedding table shots are done at 1/60s, with an aperture of f/5.6 - f/8. The photographer than adjusts the ISO and flash output as required to get a pleasing shot. That's all there is to it.
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,662
69
48
lil red dot
#12
Since you are 2nd shooter, why not ask the principal photograher?

A lot more than just aperture. Where to lock focus and iso also matters
 

Zeisser

Senior Member
Jul 12, 2008
2,655
11
38
Tampines
www.flickr.com
#13
Yes, you are right. The flash may 'freeze' and expose the shot properly, but a slow shutter speed still will drag in too much ambient and cause blur nonetheless. Even at 1/60 on a wide angle, if there is camera shakes, it will still cause blur.
Agree totally with your deduction not unless if the camera was held firm and steady at a slower shutter
speed to let in more ambient light if one desires. Sharing an example image :

@1/15sec f3.5(full aperture) 24mm ISO800 of a 24-85mm lens

 

Dec 9, 2011
318
1
18
#14
Hi,

I just started wedding photography as a second photographer. Everything was fine during the morning. Just encounter some problem during the night group shots. During the table by table group shot, some of the people is out of focus. I came to realise that I should have used a higher aperture stop in order to focus more. But, should I use aperture priority with flash or shutter speed with flash? Thank you!
Hi,

Since u mentioned u just started, I would say the easiest or the most convenient way now would be to use Aperture priority (fix around f5.6) with TTL flash mode and set flash sync speed/shutter to 1/60s. ISO for indoor table-shots should be set roughly 1600 (or even a bit more if u like) to get good background light. And thats' it.

btw, u have no issue with March-in? Or u didn't take yet? :)
 

lanxx

New Member
Feb 4, 2003
960
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0
41
www.fotki.com
#15
I use F4 to F5.6, depends on size of grp. Manual mode, shutter ard 1/80. ISO 1600
Focus on center. Flash on ETTL.
 

Jopjop

New Member
Aug 15, 2013
13
0
1
Singapore
#16
Hi,

Since u mentioned u just started, I would say the easiest or the most convenient way now would be to use Aperture priority (fix around f5.6) with TTL flash mode and set flash sync speed/shutter to 1/60s. ISO for indoor table-shots should be set roughly 1600 (or even a bit more if u like) to get good background light. And thats' it.

btw, u have no issue with March-in? Or u didn't take yet? :)
Hi I have no issue with march-in. Would like to seek your advice though. Thank you! :)
 

Aug 30, 2013
1,310
3
0
#17
This thread is useful me and those going into actual-day wedding shoot. Like many seniors have mentioned, it goes down to the basics. It would be good to tag along as volunteer photographer and not the main one. Till you are more 'stable', before engaging into real shoot for your friends/clients.
 

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