Waterfall shots


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red_ryder

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#2
Does the camera have aperture and shutter priority modes? If I'm not wrong you'll need the shutter priority mode to slow down the shutter speed to get the silky looking water effect.
 

nemesis32

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#3
Shutter Speeds

1 - 1/1,500 sec.*
(Noise Reduction is used on shutter speeds longer than 1.3 sec)
*Shutter speeds longer than 1/6 to 1 seconds operate with flash off or slow-syncro, in Manual mode. Shutter speeds of 1-15 seconds are manually selected with the lon

I think you can shoot waterfalls since you can set speed of down to 15 seconds. Just remember, bring a sturdy tripod.
 

ortega

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#4
you need to use a slow shutter speed to get the smooth water effect.
Lower your ISO to 50
Use a tripod
Don't shoot on a bright day or get a ND filter
 

Planner

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#6
Thanks for replying.

I did once set the shutter speed to 10 but the whole image became white...is that what you people known it as ND filter (whats that)? How to correct this?

Sorry man...i'm really really new to this.
 

ortega

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#7
ND = neutral density
something like sunglasses for your camera, used to cut the amount of light

What shooting modes do you have on your camera?
 

nemesis32

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#8
Planner said:
Thanks for replying.

I did once set the shutter speed to 10 but the whole image became white...is that what you people known it as ND filter (whats that)? How to correct this?

Sorry man...i'm really really new to this.
What happens is that the shot is overexposed. What you should do is to add a ND filter as suggested and it will helps. A polarisor may also be used alternatively as it helps to cut down the light and also remove any unwanted reflections from the water.
 

wilis128

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#9
or alternatively if u dun hv ND or sunglasses, shoot early early in the morning or late evening just before it gets dark.
 

Planner

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#10
Ya i think it got to do with overexposed thing. sighzz...

will try what you guys suggest again soon.....

Thanks man. Any more advise, please add on this thread hor. ;)
 

dennisc

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#11
Get a filter to block out the light or wait until late evening for the silky look. Shutter greater than 1min should produce that, no need 10secs. Hehe, u can't even exceed 1sec in daylight let alone 10secs no wonder its all white!
Effects like below rite? Btw its a drain hahaha
 

Planner

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#12
Yes..thats what i referring to.

wait...confused liao :confused:

So shutter speed put what? 1 sec huh?
 

dennisc

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#13
U can try shutter 3secs-8secs for a nice silk. No need waterfall if its not convenient, u can practice at the nearest beach like this pic
Just play around 3-15secs to suit ur fancy. I've seen cams that exceeds 1min tends to produce something alien looking
example of a beach:
 

laugh

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#14
Hmm, i believe anything longer than 1sec should suffice. When you select shutter at 1sec, and try to focus, if you see a red number or something blinking, it means there is too much light going through your shutter in 1 sec. To rectify that you can,

1) select lowest ISO
2) choose a good time when its not so bright, or choose a shaded waterfall (keke)
3) use a ND filter, which will decrease the amount of light coming through.

Hope this helps.
 

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#15
Water is a dynamic element, so there is no static, fixed rules that say 3-15 secs, for example, will give aesthetically perfect waterfall or seascape shots.

You will often find, under similar lighting condition, 8 secs will give pic1 waterfall correct exposure but will give pic2 waterfall over-exposure. The single variable here is the water that falls at different rate.

So, for a ferocious fall, 2-4 secs may be about right. 8 secs will often result to over-exposed water, not necessarily means the overall pic is over-exposed, just that the water is too whitish.

For a slow, gentle fall, 15-30secs may be essential to achieve the sensous effect of the falling water.


Best condition to shoot a waterfall is during a overcast day when contrast of direct sunlight is kept to the minimum.
 

Planner

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#16
fwaaaaahhhhh good information from all of you...I'm learning..... :thumbsup:

U think tonight i go home, turn on the tap and let it flow and take a shot using those techniques u guys mention....will I get the silky effect? :think:
 

megaweb

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#17
See many CS members are so helpful to give tips to take long exposure


btw, Planner, do you know how to operate your camera (IXUS 330) to take long exposure ?
 

AMDer

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#20
a quick tip:
if u cant attach a cable release or remote control to your digital camera. u can use the timer trick.
becase if u are taking this kind of shots, u need a good tripod to make sure your camera do not move or your pic will come out very blur one. even if u press the shutter button, u are actually moving the camera liao. just a small little movement will affect the pic output.
so after u set up your camera settings, and ready to take the pic. set to timer mode. press and wait for 10 secs. this way the camera wont be disturb and your pic should come our clear!
 

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