wat is the difference between 1.3x crop and Full frame?


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#2
It refers to sensor size in DSLR. Full frame means the sensor is the same size as 1 frame of your normal 135 format (35mm) film (36X24mm). 1.3 crop means that the sensor is about 77% of the full frame size. The implications of the crop factor is many, one of which is the angle of view. Crop size sensors (APS H=1.3, APS C=1.6/1.5) tend to use a percentage in the center of the image circle of lenses, and so your 18mm wide angle on a 1.3 crop becomes a less wide 1.3X18=23.4mm and on a 1.6/1.5 crop (most consumer to prosumer level DSLRs) body becomes a 1.6X18=28.8mm lense. Also there is the very important issue of sensor noise. Full frame sensors tend to have larger photosites and thus generate lower signal to noise ratio (to over simplify). A full frame sensor versus a cropped sensor, both 12 megapixels for example, will more likely deliver (the full frame) a less noisy image compared to the cropped sensor.


http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/digital-camera-sensor-size.htm
 

compro_1975

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Apr 24, 2005
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#3
ooo so it is the noise difference right
 

liarliar

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May 13, 2007
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#4
According to most users shooting at higher ISO levels with a smaller sensor cam yields higher level of noise.

Image quality may not be better as compare to full frame sensor cams since the while concept of taking in a scene or subject are squashed to fit in a smaller tight sensor and blown up again to reproduce teh image digitally. More like the idea of skewing and stretching, resizing an original image repeatedly.
 

theRBK

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May 16, 2005
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#5
no, it is not the noise difference...

with smaller photosites, there is a tendency, all else being equal, to have more noise... this of course depends on how many photosites you squeeze onto a chip... it is the density of the photosites rather than the absolute size of the chip that matters in this case... in the case of a full frame chip with a higher density of photosites than that of a 1.3 crop sensor, then, all else being equal, the 1.3 crop sensor might actually have less noise... :)

and image quality has nothing to do with squeezing and stretching of images in that sense... it is just that larger photosites capture more light, and due to lower density, put less stress on the sharpness of a lens than a dense array of photosites... :)
 

lastboltnut

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Mar 23, 2006
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Where the wind blows...
#7
Other than noise, the DOF will be different too. That means if you use a FF and APS sensor cam to shoot a same composition (same obj size and position of the obj in the photo), with the same f-stop, the DOF will be different.:)
 

Dec 5, 2007
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#8
It refers to sensor size in DSLR. Full frame means the sensor is the same size as 1 frame of your normal 135 format (35mm) film (36X24mm). 1.3 crop means that the sensor is about 77% of the full frame size. The implications of the crop factor is many, one of which is the angle of view. Crop size sensors (APS H=1.3, APS C=1.6/1.5) tend to use a percentage in the center of the image circle of lenses, and so your 18mm wide angle on a 1.3 crop becomes a less wide 1.3X18=23.4mm and on a 1.6/1.5 crop (most consumer to prosumer level DSLRs) body becomes a 1.6X18=28.8mm lense. Also there is the very important issue of sensor noise. Full frame sensors tend to have larger photosites and thus generate lower signal to noise ratio (to over simplify). A full frame sensor versus a cropped sensor, both 12 megapixels for example, will more likely deliver (the full frame) a less noisy image compared to the cropped sensor.


http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/digital-camera-sensor-size.htm


:sweat: :thumbsup:
 

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