Upgrade to D5 body or spend money on buying lenses


Stephen27

New Member
Aug 19, 2012
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Yishun
#1
As I have problems with low-light shootings indoors (without use of flash)including WB problems
whenever I shoot indoors at events where the lightings are a mixture of fluorescents, spot-lights, yellow bulbs etc.,
I always have problems adjusting my WB getting the perfect colours. It's always either slightly yellowish, bluish,
not natural colours on the faces of subjects etc.,I have been advised by a salesman at Cathay Photo that a D5 can help
me solve most of my problems with proper adjusting.

I need advice from our learned friends on whether I should spend money on a D5 body or instead buy some good lenses
to help alleviate the problem?

My present Nikon body is D700 and the two lenses I currently have are the AF-S 24-70mm, f/2.8G ED and the AF-S 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR

Thank you in advance.
 

Octarine

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Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#2
Advice has beeen given to you already in the previous thread:
http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1713378&p=9521383&viewfull=1#post9521383
http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1713378&p=9521395&viewfull=1#post9521395

Did you read these links and understood them? Then you should not have the expectation that in a mixed light situation all colors will be perfect.
What have you done so far? You can do a lot of tests at home just using your own lights and flash. It will be the same mixed light and you can do all kinds of playing and testing without any pressure or client expectations.

A salesman's advice is the worst advice you can get (with few exceptions). Recommending a newer (and more expensive) body to solve a problem with mixed light only shows that this person has actually zero understanding of the topic and is only eyeing your money and his sales commission. I hope you don't want this expensive lesson just to learn the basics about light and color temperature.
Your lenses have zero influence on the color temperature.
 

Stephen27

New Member
Aug 19, 2012
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#3
Thank U for your advice.For me, mixed lighting seems a difficult and complicated subject to comprehend.

What about indoors low-light shooting without flash? Seems it is the rave of the D5.

Can my present D700 also overcome low-light shooting (indoors)?
 

thoongeng

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2010
1,260
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#4
You need to remember that when you set the White Balance, all the colors are shifted to either warmer or cooler colours. Sometimes you can only tweak the White Balance to the best balance considering the situation, then have to use software to remove specific casts if you need. Shooting in RAW helps as the latitude to shift the colours are wider.

D700 is a high end camera so should have similar settings for white balance as the D5

What are your problem with low-light shooting on D700? Too much noise? Autofocus problems?
D5 is newer with improved technology, but will it solve all your problems? Unfortunately you probably have to try it out to see. Though in some situations where light is really low, it will be a challenge with any camera.
 

Stephen27

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Aug 19, 2012
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#5
I intend to buy a portrait lens and have noticed many many photographers carrying the 70-200mm f/2.8 lens.

I was told that this lens is ideal for shooting portraits. From research, portraits are shot at 85mm so my question is:

Should I buy an 85mm f/2.8 lens instead of the 70-200?
 

dennisc

Senior Member
Oct 24, 2002
2,026
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Freezing Upp Thomson/Mandai!
#6
Nikon you'll get simpsons, tried and tested seen way way too many people shooting yellow skins, especially if you don't balance it properly, or change brand lah
 

one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
814
12
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#7
Thank U for your advice.For me, mixed lighting seems a difficult and complicated subject to comprehend.

What about indoors low-light shooting without flash? Seems it is the rave of the D5.

Can my present D700 also overcome low-light shooting (indoors)?
Being a retiree you should consider carefully.That said D700 is still ok by the very virtue it is
a full frame camera.It still decent image wise.Have a look here:

https://photographylife.com/reviews/nikon-d700/4

Can it overcome low-light shooting without flash? if you have a large enough aperture F1.2 or F1.8 why not? Much depends what you want to shoot.

Mixed lighting will pose the same challenge whether it is D700 or D5.It's really not that difficult.
Just know what lighting is dominant illuminating your subject.If example florescent light is dominant
that set for florescent WB that way people's skin will be rendered neutral.

If flash is used then know that it will be dominant (daylight). Another way is learning to convert one light source to another by using coloured filters on the flash.Eg. daylight to florescent or daylight to tungsten/incandescent. Much reading to do.
 

Stephen27

New Member
Aug 19, 2012
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#8
Many thanks for your advice same time providing the link to the D700 reviews.

After reading some of the reviews, I reckon the D700 can still continue to serve me for a couple of years more.

As such, I will use the money to buy some new lenses instead.I presently have two lenses i.e. the AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm, f/2.8G ED
and the AF-S Nikkor 28-300, f/3.5-5.6G ED VR. As I shoot anything and everything, can you please recommend me a wide-angle lens for landscape
and a portrait lens? A point of interest though; I have seen many photographers carrying the 70-200mm, f/2.8 lens at most events and they say it is an excellent lens for portraits.
However, I did some research and found that portraits are mostly shot at 85mm hence the question now is, should I buy an 85mm lens instead of the 70-200mm?
 

one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
814
12
18
#9
Many thanks for your advice same time providing the link to the D700 reviews.

After reading some of the reviews, I reckon the D700 can still continue to serve me for a couple of years more.

As such, I will use the money to buy some new lenses instead.I presently have two lenses i.e. the AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm, f/2.8G ED
and the AF-S Nikkor 28-300, f/3.5-5.6G ED VR. As I shoot anything and everything, can you please recommend me a wide-angle lens for landscape
and a portrait lens? A point of interest though; I have seen many photographers carrying the 70-200mm, f/2.8 lens at most events and they say it is an excellent lens for portraits.
However, I did some research and found that portraits are mostly shot at 85mm hence the question now is, should I buy an 85mm lens instead of the 70-200mm?
About low light performance...if you know how it can be achieved.Link below is using F1.2 manual lens
focus which depends whether at a particular scene is brighter or darker.Being older man it may be challenging but if there's a will there's a way.

http://regex.info/blog/2008-09-15/935

AF-s 24-70mm f/2.8 is a good lens but for portraits you need something a bit longer..85,100,135mm.
You need to be a comfortable distance for the subject to feel more natural.Primes are better (sharper)less bulky although now a good zoom is comparable 70-200mm f/2.8 is commonly used but do read the user reviews,experience and comments as to reliability and maintenance issues. Please read the "fine print" ;) Alternatively there are 3rd. party brands with good reviews like Sigma art series but do consider if the are autofocus.
Although it may be an advantage (manual) if autofocus is inadequate in low light circumstances.

As for wide angle lens 10-20mm is a good start nikon or 3rd. party but seriously shooting with wide angle is another learning experience especially in city environment. Do understand that in all probability you need post processing like WB and sharpening to bring out the best in photos.Don't just leave it to the camera.
 

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Stephen27

New Member
Aug 19, 2012
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#10
Thank you for your comments and advice including the link to the f/1.2 manual lens.

Wow! I'm convinced I should keep my f/1.2 manual lens for low-light shootings.

Only set-back is my eyesight. If dont use specs, pic not too sharp.
 

Stephen27

New Member
Aug 19, 2012
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#12
Budget-wise,I am prepared to spend between 10K to 15K for the following i.e.
1) D5 (XQD)
2) Speedlight SB-950
3) extra batteries
4) 1 wide-angle Nikkor Lens
5) 1 x 50mm f/1.8 prime lens (optional)
6) 1 x 85mm or 70-200mm, f/2.8 lens

If these items are within the 10K to 15K budget then I am willing to spend this amount as an upgrade from my D700.

What is your advice please?
 

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Bluesubm6

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Feb 29, 2016
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The Woodlands in the North
#13
Budget-wise,I am prepared to spend between 10K to 15K for the following i.e.
1) D5 (XQD)
2) Speedlight SB-950
3) extra batteries
4) 1 wide-angle Nikkor Lens
5) 1 x 50mm f/1.8 prime lens (optional)
6) 1 x 85mm or 70-200mm, f/2.8 lens

If these items are within the 10K to 15K budget then I am willing to spend this amount as an upgrade from my D700.

What is your advice please?
I think you should save the money and attend a course on photography instead. Improve your skills before considering buying new gear.
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#14
I would strongly advise to rent the lenses that you have read about. Try them out on your current camera, try out portraits for yourself. Then set the 70-200 to about 85mm and take pictures of the same person or object with both lenses. Compare, form your own opinion.
Which brings me to a point that I sense between your lines. It seems that you have the impression that upgrading gear will solve your questions and problems. Well, it would only work for the focusing topic and your eyesight. None of all the other questions (White balance, shooting portraits etc) will be solved by upgrading your equipment. It requires a skill upgrade. If in doubt, rent the equipment.
 

Stephen27

New Member
Aug 19, 2012
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#15
Many thanks for the advice to attend a course on photography. Yes, I have attended a couple of courses here
and have enrolled myself in a couple of online courses too.

Theorytically speaking, I am quite alright and have a grasp of photography and its principles but practically, sometimes I panic (kan cheong) when I find
that the photos do not come out as expected. Such incidents happen at birthday functions, Christmas parties etc., No time to practice!
In fact, I do not practice at all on my free time because I usually depend on all that I have learnt in theory and only put them to use at functions.

Am I lacking in something? Please kindly advise me.
 

Stephen27

New Member
Aug 19, 2012
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#16
Thank you for advising me to rent the lenses and to try them out.
Firstly, I do not know where to rent and secondly,humbly-speaking, I always believe in owning my own things and consider them as long term investments.

From your advice, it means that I should spend alot of time practicing. If that is the way to improve and become proficient then I guess this will have to be my New Year resolution for 2018 i.e. to practice with my D700 at least once a week for starters. What do you think?
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#17
So you use these functions as test bed and the people there as your personal Guinea pigs? Would you, in return, accept that the plumber you call for some piping works has only read some books and is trying his luck in your house?
The people attending these functions expect you to deliver decent pictures. Knowing that you are not there, still trying somehow is a form of disrespect and lack of responsibility.
 

Feb 26, 2014
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Singapore
#18
Thank you for advising me to rent the lenses and to try them out.
Firstly, I do not know where to rent and secondly,humbly-speaking, I always believe in owning my own things and consider them as long term investments.

From your advice, it means that I should spend alot of time practicing. If that is the way to improve and become proficient then I guess this will have to be my New Year resolution for 2018 i.e. to practice with my D700 at least once a week for starters. What do you think?
If you go to google

and enter "Lens rental singapore"

You will find many answers

And yes you must practice. If you believe everything that salesmen tell you then you are lacking the basic common sense and experience

So, get experience

Especially before you go for a function, you should understand the lighting first instead of thinking your theory is enough

Or sell your gear and hire a photographer with experience
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#19
Firstly, I do not know where to rent and secondly,humbly-speaking, I always believe in owning my own things and consider them as long term investments.
The first point can easily be solved with Google or even searching the forum here. There are several shops in SG where you can rent equipment.
The second, owing equipment, is understandable but completely irrelevant for your case. Especially for occasional, non-regular usage (rent to try) it seems to me less costly to rent a lens compared to the price drop between buying a lens and the remaining value after first usage.
If, after trying 5 lenses, you finally find the right one for you.. then by all means, buy it.

From your advice, it means that I should spend alot of time practicing. If that is the way to improve and become proficient then I guess this will have to be my New Year resolution for 2018 i.e. to practice with my D700 at least once a week for starters. What do you think?
Go ahead. As some seniors here stated long time ago: a good picture is about 75% skills, composition, the right moment etc and only 25% goes to equipment. At the moment you are focusing on the 25% ..
 

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Stephen27

New Member
Aug 19, 2012
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#20
Oops! My apologies but I forgot to mention that all those functions are family functions (free of charge shootings), not commercial ones as I still do not have the pre-requisite skills
to offer my services yet.

Perhaps by the end of 2018 after I have diligently practised what I have learnt.
 

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