Unofficial E1 Flash Sync Speed Tests


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Feb 13, 2004
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Interesting. I didn't know the CCD "shutter" works like a mechanical shutter. I thought when the syn speed is exceed in a digital camera, you will get total black out instead of partial black out as shown in the link.
 

chancy

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stanleyeo said:
Interesting. I didn't know the CCD "shutter" works like a mechanical shutter. I thought when the syn speed is exceed in a digital camera, you will get total black out instead of partial black out as shown in the link.
Hello Stanleyeo,

Pardon a correction, but the E1 does have a mechanical shutter (albeit a quiet one); and one that's rated for 150,000 cycles, that's in the same league as the best from its noiser competitors.

Cheers
 

Feb 13, 2004
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chancy said:
Hello Stanleyeo,

Pardon a correction, but the E1 does have a mechanical shutter (albeit a quiet one); and one that's rated for 150,000 cycles, that's in the same league as the best from its noiser competitors.

Cheers
Thanks for the enlightenment! Not all cameras using mechanical shutter right? What is the advantages of mechanical shutter?
 

chancy

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stanleyeo said:
Thanks for the enlightenment! Not all cameras using mechanical shutter right? What is the advantages of mechanical shutter?
Hello Stanleyeo,

Checks on the internet reveals the following document at

http://morel.dmc.caltech.edu:16080/nmw/pdfs/021204digitalcameras/CCD_description.pdf.

If I may extract a relevant, self-explanatory section therein below. I don't have full knowledge of sensors adapted for other makes of cameras but it appears to make sense for the E-system bodies.

"CCD's used in professional cameras tend to be Full Frame Transfer, they don't have a shift register, this means that a mechanical shutter is absolutely required to control the start / stop measurement of light. The shutter is opened and then closed again (say 1/60s later), the whole CCD shifts data off itself into the serial register where it's processed as the "RAW" image. As Full Frame CCD's are simpler (don't have shift registers and associated electronics around each photodiode) they have a much better Fill Factor (around 70%) and don't require or use microlenses. The disadvantage is that you can't get a video feed out of them which is the main reason we don't see more manufacturers using Full Frame CCD's (we're all too used to our LCD preview).

Pro's & Con's associated with each CCD type:

Full Frame CCD
-----------------
High image quality
High sensitivity
High dynamic range
Larger sizes
No microlenses
Not capable of video feed
Top shutter speeds limited by mechanical shutter
Require mechanical shutter

Interline Transfer CCD
-----------------
Good image quality
Good sensitivity when using microlenses
Low noise
High frame rates / electronic shutter
Video feed capable
Don't need mechanical shutter
Microlenses can cause aberrations

Cheers,
 

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