Understanding


biskandar

New Member
May 11, 2010
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#1


1. in what area is critique to be sought?
Understanding feeling

2. what one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
Direct focus the people face and with B&W colour to express his understanding feeling

3. under what circumstance is the picture taken? (physical conditions/emotions)
I saw an old man near kampong glam cc , he's reading a magazine and try to understand the content inside .

4. what the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture
the bike make distract .
 

foxtwo

Senior Member
Mar 11, 2004
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#2
There seems to be this issue with you regarding the angles you choose to shoot from. May I offer 2 directions of comment, the first was to be my initial response but decided to mull it over and the second opinon, which I personally slide towards.


1. I wanted to state the obvious, which was the bike being in the foreground and how needless it is to complicate compositions, when simple & effective is already hard to achieve. Drawing reference to your previous post, Repose, where similarly it was commented by others the shooting angle was not the best.


Well rather than give that response, which sounds quite common and simplistic...


2. My alternative opinion. There's this line that gets blurred when offering critique. Because we're commenting based on the knowledge and feelings we have, it's only logical the work be judged based by our standards. One thing I try hard not to do, not to direct camera angles/compositions. Cause that's not creativity, and it's not letting the photographer be who he/she is. It may be that you're wired this way (this is how you want to compose, how to shoot), or it may be you're still exploring or learning. For the former reason, no one should say you're wrong. Maybe it still needs some fine-tuning. No matter what critique is offered here, please continue to grow how you want to. You don't have to take all of the advice, just the ones that suit you or make sense.

The bike doesn't make the photo, but it doesn't break it entirely either... there's no doubt lessening its profile will in turn lessen its distraction. But will the composition still hold the same meaning for the photographer? I can't answer that.

For compositions there's no right or wrong just better or worse in people's eyes. When you shoot street, I don't know if there's a pattern in your composition one should be noticing. Landscapes are much easier to opine good compositions, street comes in many shapes.
 

biskandar

New Member
May 11, 2010
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#3
Thanks foxtwo for the comments :) .

Yes, it's true that the bike is quite a bit distracting, but still ok with it.

As am still exploring and learning in this street photography style , I will try your method by not to frame with direct camera angles to the object .
 

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