Type of Lenses


Status
Not open for further replies.

revenant

New Member
Apr 8, 2002
1,101
0
0
33
collinyeo.blogspot.com
#1
hmm..... I've heard quite a number of lenses out there, like Canon's L lenses, Minolta G lenses etc. How many type are there and what's the difference they do?
 

Kit

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2002
11,699
42
48
42
Upper Bukit Timah
Visit site
#2
Originally posted by revenant
hmm..... I've heard quite a number of lenses out there, like Canon's L lenses, Minolta G lenses etc. How many type are there and what's the difference they do?
What you've come about are names/abbreviations that Canon and Minolta used to identify their particular line of lenses. I'm not sure about Minolta but "L" is used to denote Canon's top of the line lenses. Nikon doesn't have a specified name for its top of line lenses though. Main difference is, these names belong to different brands.
 

revenant

New Member
Apr 8, 2002
1,101
0
0
33
collinyeo.blogspot.com
#3
Originally posted by Kit


What you've come about are names/abbreviations that Canon and Minolta used to identify their particular line of lenses. I'm not sure about Minolta but "L" is used to denote Canon's top of the line lenses. Nikon doesn't have a specified name for its top of line lenses though. Main difference is, these names belong to different brands.
thanx for the prompt reply.

hmm...... is it that only Canon lense can be used on Canon's SLR cam and same goes to other brands?
 

Kit

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2002
11,699
42
48
42
Upper Bukit Timah
Visit site
#4
Originally posted by revenant


thanx for the prompt reply.

hmm...... is it that only Canon lense can be used on Canon's SLR cam and same goes to other brands?
Short answer yes. Canon lenses can only be used on Canon SLRs.
However, I've come across an adaptor that actually allows you to use Nikkor lenses on Canon bodies. I was told by the owner that you can't get them anymore nowadays.

Anyway, if you're going for an AF system, I don't see the point of getting say......... Canon lenses for a Nikon body. Even if you managed to fit them together, the systems are totally different and therefore, they won't "talk" to each other. You lose most of the functions.
 

revenant

New Member
Apr 8, 2002
1,101
0
0
33
collinyeo.blogspot.com
#5
Originally posted by Kit


Short answer yes. Canon lenses can only be used on Canon SLRs.
However, I've come across an adaptor that actually allows you to use Nikkor lenses on Canon bodies. I was told by the owner that you can't get them anymore nowadays.

Anyway, if you're going for an AF system, I don't see the point of getting say......... Canon lenses for a Nikon body. Even if you managed to fit them together, the systems are totally different and therefore, they won't "talk" to each other. You lose most of the functions.
ic..... hmm... what's a AF system? Auto-Focus?
In SLR, the AF depends on the lense huh?
 

Kit

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2002
11,699
42
48
42
Upper Bukit Timah
Visit site
#6
Originally posted by revenant


ic..... hmm... what's a AF system? Auto-Focus?
In SLR, the AF depends on the lense huh?
Yup AF = Auto Focus

The lense is an essential part of any system but there's more to that. For modern SLRs, the built in processor "reads" light through the lens and determine exposure information like your shutter speed in accordance to the aperture you've selected and vice versa. As for AF, different systems have different configurations. In order to focus, a motor will be used to drive the lens cam based on the information given by the processor which is turn reads light through the lense as mentioned before. Its a cycle thing I guess. All elements are needed in order to work.

This is really a ver basic explanation. I myself am not 100% sure about what's really going on in detail. If you want to know more, I believe there are some book available. Try Borders or Kino.
 

Jeffery

New Member
Jul 5, 2002
120
0
0
Singapore
Visit site
#7
Originally posted by revenant
hmm..... I've heard quite a number of lenses out there, like Canon's L lenses, Minolta G lenses etc. How many type are there and what's the difference they do?
The best way is to get the manufacturer's catalog on lenses.
Nikon has a Nikkor Lenses catalog which is slightly outdated.
Most new lenses information are available on their website.

I have one for Canon EF lenses available in the form of a CD.
You can get it from Canon showroom in Bukit Merah.

These catalogs/CD explains the types of lenses available, technology incorporated and techincal specification.

Hope that helps.

Rgds,
Jeffery
 

Jeffery

New Member
Jul 5, 2002
120
0
0
Singapore
Visit site
#8
Originally posted by Kit


What you've come about are names/abbreviations that Canon and Minolta used to identify their particular line of lenses. I'm not sure about Minolta but "L" is used to denote Canon's top of the line lenses. Nikon doesn't have a specified name for its top of line lenses though. Main difference is, these names belong to different brands.
Nikon does not have a specified name for its top of line lenses but they go by AF-S notation ;) . I saw a post that mentioned Nikon top of line lenses have a gold ring at the end of the lens.


Rgds,
Jeffery
 

Kit

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2002
11,699
42
48
42
Upper Bukit Timah
Visit site
#9
Originally posted by Jeffery


Nikon does not have a specified name for its top of line lenses but they go by AF-S notation ;) . I saw a post that mentioned Nikon top of line lenses have a gold ring at the end of the lens.


Rgds,
Jeffery
Nope, not true anymore. The new 24-85 AF-S is a consumer lens.
 

Jeffery

New Member
Jul 5, 2002
120
0
0
Singapore
Visit site
#10
Originally posted by Kit


Nope, not true anymore. The new 24-85 AF-S is a consumer lens.
Yup, you're right. Completely forgotten abt that one though I owned one as well ;)

Rgds,
Jeffery
 

tucker

New Member
Jul 13, 2002
431
0
0
singapore
www.flickr.com
#11
thought I saw a couple of adapter ring somewhere in chinatown, a small cam shop inside this very deep bldg.

it's labeled in jap, but ya can make out that it points from
canon ---> nikon
yashica ---> canon

propably manual bodies then ?
but still very interesting
(^_^)
 

Ian

Senior Member
Feb 20, 2002
2,548
0
0
56
Perth Australia
#12
Originally posted by Jeffery


Nikon does not have a specified name for its top of line lenses but they go by AF-S notation ;) . I saw a post that mentioned Nikon top of line lenses have a gold ring at the end of the lens.
Rgds,
Jeffery
Actually not true at all as many of Nikon's professional lenses are MF and still in production, eg: 800/5.6 AIS, 200/2 AIS etc.
 

cheechee

New Member
Sep 22, 2002
567
0
0
37
Sengkang
Visit site
#13
Ho.... also some more canon lens questions:

using an EOS series camera with its kits lens now, which i heard the kit lens is not so good, but what is the difference?

And if i outgrow the lens(which "outgrow" is also a blurr term, if it means feeling that the lens dun give u better aid in getting better pic, i always have the feeling, does it means i have outgrow it? ;p ), what kind of lens should i go for? Wide? zoom? etc?

Can anyone give any guidance for choosing the next lens for newbie? those Ideal and budget one for portrait and others that is nice in taking landscape(wide angle).
I am more interested in doing landscape shots, and maybe sometimes some shots with people inside. any advice on the next lens?

What is the difference in terms of quality/speed, etc.

And USM, EFII, EFII USM? etc? how they differs and their accending order in terms of quality and usage?:D

Thanks in advance
 

denizenx

Senior Member
Feb 1, 2002
4,058
0
0
41
L2TPYSG
Visit site
#14
canon only got one EF which is the electronic type SLR... FD is the old mechanical type, not mutually compatible.
the I or II or III means the version for that model...
USM is a silent fast motor, costs slightly more.
IS means Unshakeable like sony videocams, helps when u got no tripod by up to around 2 stops (n stop == 2^n, eg. 1/30 - 1 stop => 1/60) so a shaky 1/5 secs with IS on would be as shaky as 1/15 to most ppl. If you drink vodka through ur nose regularly IS is useless to you.
L is not a technology, just means that lens is of better production quality. usually has red ring and the big ones are beige/white in colour. I think it stands for Lorbert or Luxury. eg, the new 24-70mm L lens is 2,100 USD.

outgrow ur lens is 2-step: means u start noticing that ur pictures are slightly blur at the edges and the sharpness of an in-focus picture is not like the one u see on the net, and that AF is not really fast under poor lighting etc;
and then u realise ur bank acct is having too many digits and makes ur eyes water so u MUST divest of the surplus by investing in magical fluorite crystals that will make your pictures look like a sony dvd ad, and ur tongue starts hanging out and u make L-apping noises...
usually it just means you want to buy better equipment (// PCs)!

my personal advice is to go 2nd hand trying out the diff types until u start working and have a stabilised EXPENDABLE income... then u can L-oll your tongue out and start calling yourself Lorbert...
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom