Trade Show


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milkmagix

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Hi Red Dawn.

It is a trade show and we have done it more like a lifestyle way. Any comment to the photos....

Regards
 

Red Dawn

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Jan 17, 2002
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Originally posted by milkmagix
Hi Red Dawn.

It is a trade show and we have done it more like a lifestyle way. Any comment to the photos....

Regards
Hi

i think overall the photos are nicely taken, and i like the bit of motion blur in some of them which conveys dance movement. Here are a few points for u to consider (my opinions)

- You use flash? there are harsh shadows visible in some of the photos, especially when the performers are close to that backdrop. You may want to diffuse that flash a bit, shoot without flash in available light with high ISO film (not always possible and no catchlights in models' eyes), or wait for them to move out a little before shooting.

- shooting with a higher ISO film than 200 might reduce the flash output from your flash....

- background is distracting in some photos. but i understand u may have no choice over your position.....

this is a reebok trade fair?
 

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milkmagix

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You are RIGHT!

sorry but no prize. BTW, thank you for you comment.
 

fish

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Jan 18, 2002
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Originally posted by Red Dawn

- You use flash? there are harsh shadows visible in some of the photos, especially when the performers are close to that backdrop. You may want to diffuse that flash a bit, shoot without flash in available light with high ISO film (not always possible and no catchlights in models' eyes), or wait for them to move out a little before shooting.

- shooting with a higher ISO film than 200 might reduce the flash output from your flash....

- background is distracting in some photos. but i understand u may have no choice over your position.....
Interesting. Thanks for sharing.

If u don't mind me asking, for indoor events like such, u mean it would be good to use higher ISOs (eg. 200 - 400)?
what difference will that make?

i got no idea on this. hope u dun mind giving me some tips. :)
 

Red Dawn

Senior Member
Jan 17, 2002
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Singapore
www.5stonesphoto.com
Originally posted by fish

Interesting. Thanks for sharing.

If u don't mind me asking, for indoor events like such, u mean it would be good to use higher ISOs (eg. 200 - 400)?
what difference will that make?

i got no idea on this. hope u dun mind giving me some tips. :)
Hi,

i'm assuming u're also asking in general how to take good flash photos. gosh, this is a big topic and it's 12:30 am now, but i'll try ;p i'm assuming u have some kind of auto / TTL flash.
Using manual flashes changes things!

First, the golden rules:

1. flash metering is different from ambient light metering.

2. Changing your aperture affects the amount of flash output. Set a big aperture say f2, and the flash output will be less. Set a smaller aperture and the flash output will be increased. (Note: this applies for TTL flashes)

3. Changing your shutter speeds will NOT affect the amount of flash output by your camera. (Note: this applies for TTL flashes)

4. Changing your shutter speed affects the amount of ambient light reaching your camera. Set a lower shutter speed and you will be able to capture more of the ambient light of the scene.

A nice flash photo should show your subjects well exposed by the flash, and still show the background to give context as to where they are. (my opinion anyway, otherwise, you may as well take the same shot in a studio with black background). Okay, sometimes u might want a certain effect, and really want a in-your-flash flash photo, but let's ignore those options for the time being.

Let's imagine the typical indoor scene at a dinner, and u're asked to take a group photo. If u use a compact camera with slow film, or with your SLR in P or auto mode, the result is a guaranteed shot whereby subjects are well exposed, but the background is completely black. (most likely the flash would be quite harsh as well). Not very nice right? Your SLR in P or Auto mode or a compact camera will thoughtfully try to limit your shutter speeds to a handholdable value, but this also ensures you lose the background. A faster film will help, but not much.

So now with your SLR, and keeping the golden rules in mind, meter the ambient light and determine the correct exposure for the scene. Is the shutter speed reasonable? If yes, go ahead and take the photo with your camera in manual mode.

most likely however, the shutter speed will be fairly low, esp indoors. A good tried and tested method would be to deliberately underexpose the background by 1 stop. This should still allow you to capture the background, while making your subjects stand out a little. Adjusting your shutter speed (remember that shutter speeds affect ambient light exposure) to underexpose the scene by 1 stop will allow you to use your flash to illuminate your subjects nicely while still retaining the background.

Sometimes however, it may be so dark that even underexposing by 1-2 stops don't help with good shutter speeds. That's when a higher speed film comes in. A higher ISO allows you to have more shutter speed. Normally pple use ISO 400 for most indoor shoots, but i've known of wedding photographers who use ISO 800 for wedding dinners.

So you see, it's a constant juggling between good shutter speeds and ambient light capture. Sometimes, it may be so dark that you do have to sacrifice the background for handholdable shutter speeds. Also, be careful of depth of field for large groups of pple. Setting too big an aperture may allow less flash output, but your subjects may be out of focus if they are standing out of the plane of focus.

for group shots, the most i go down is f4 and 1/30s - with a wide angle lens. Generally i try to shoot with higher (safer) shutter speeds of 1/50 to 1/60 and with a smaller aperture of f5.6. Your in camera meter is your best friend for telling you how much are u underexposing (or overexposing - watch out for that, esp when u change from indoor to outdoor shoot. watch that meter!)

hope this helps. i'm sure others may have some good tips too. note that the above applies to indoor shooting. outdoor fill flash technique is another different story.
 

fish

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Red Dawn,

Wah! so sorry to crack ur head up in the middle of the nite. :p
i'll digest ur advice as much as possible.

well, the thing is, i'm using a g2. smthg which should be too small for u. :D thus i'll try to apply those SLR methods u mentioned to it.

there'll be this dinner function coming up soon n i'm preparing to cover it. just covering it voluntarily for practice lah. :)

hey, thanks a lot!
 

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