things to get to proctect my dslr


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Nov 8, 2009
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#1
hey guys, i just got my hand on a dslr and want some ideas on how to protect it from dust and humidity. cheers
 

strikeboy

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Sep 2, 2008
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#2
if you got alof of equipment get a dry cabi, else you can use a dry box
 

Reportage

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Nov 24, 2008
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hey guys, i just got my hand on a dslr and want some ideas on how to protect it from dust and humidity. cheers
If its the K20D you have, then no problems as i can say its weather resistance is pretty much up there with even the Canon 1D.

Otherwise, the best protection would be those sealed casings for underwater photography.
 

Nov 8, 2009
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#4
i just got myself a 1000D. well my main purpose is to prolong its life. somemore im taking it to NZ for my hols, so pretty scared of damaging it during my trip. and no im not that advance for underwater shooting ;)
 

Reportage

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i just got myself a 1000D. well my main purpose is to prolong its life. somemore im taking it to NZ for my hols, so pretty scared of damaging it during my trip. and no im not that advance for underwater shooting ;)
You asked for the best protection, i cant think of anything more airtight that is within the price range of most consumers. With the casing, you can go to humid amazon or dusty sahara without much issues. NZ also has plenty of beautiful beaches and spots for diving. Kinda sad not being able to bring because worried of very fine sand or salt water.



http://www.digifish.nl/en/news0220.html

The cheapest option would be a transparent water proof bag and rubber bands for just about everything except underwater. Not as elegant but it works. :)
 

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limwhow

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Jun 9, 2009
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#6
Hello, sleepyboiwang. Firstly a very warm welcome to you.
For normal use - cameras are generally very tough machines. So are lenses.
1. Try not to change lenses in dusty environments.
2. For lenses - just make sure you have your UV filter on as a protection.
3. Do get a lens hood for the lens to prevent glare, and importantly to reduce directly banging onto the lens should it swing against something.
4. Clean the external of the lens (not the glass element) and camera with a cloth after every shoot.
5. Blow, brush and carefully clean your lens front element before and after shoot.
6. Try to prepare a rain cover for the camera body and lens in case it rains. Do not under-estimate the detrimental effects of rain on the camera.

My humble suggestions.
 

Fotophilic

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Jun 18, 2006
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#7
hey guys, i just got my hand on a dslr and want some ideas on how to protect it from dust and humidity. cheers
i just got myself a 1000D. well my main purpose is to prolong its life. somemore im taking it to NZ for my hols, so pretty scared of damaging it during my trip. and no im not that advance for underwater shooting ;)
just get a bag with gd cushion.
another way is to learn how operate it properly. i can't think of other ways to prolong its life.
if its just for a week or two, u can forget about the humidity thing. camera bags are not air tight anyway.
:)
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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#8
i just got myself a 1000D. well my main purpose is to prolong its life. somemore im taking it to NZ for my hols, so pretty scared of damaging it during my trip. and no im not that advance for underwater shooting ;)
Stop being scared helps most. Knowing is better. Plenty of tips here, but don't forget common sense as:
- Dust is everywhere. It takes less efforts to remove it then trying to avoid it.
- Perfect protection: at home, in the box, put into a save, keys forgotten ...
- Cameras are built to last and withstand the elements, they not made of sugar cotton.
- Your manual tells you what the camera can take (temperature) - in reality it's even more.
- People will finally see your pictures, not the camera.
- With too much protection in mind you are not free to explore new things.
Anything to add? :)
 

Nov 8, 2009
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#9
thanks for all the advice ppl;) at least it puts my mind at ease haha. now i just have to worry abt preventing condensation from collecting after alighting from plane
 

limwhow

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Jun 9, 2009
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#10
thanks for all the advice ppl;) at least it puts my mind at ease haha. now i just have to worry abt preventing condensation from collecting after alighting from plane
Huh...:what:..?
That never worried me leh...
Now the season in New Zealand is summer. I really don't think the temperature difference between the cabin and the outside NZL air is going to be so drastic that condensation will appear straight away on your camera.
 

Timolol

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Sep 24, 2009
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#11
Huh...:what:..?
That never worried me leh...
Now the season in New Zealand is summer. I really don't think the temperature difference between the cabin and the outside NZL air is going to be so drastic that condensation will appear straight away on your camera.
Ditto. I was shooting the moment I got off the plane at Queenstown last summer. Didn't realise any condensation.
 

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