Telezoom Lens for Wildlife?


tyubhunhg

New Member
Aug 1, 2017
24
0
1
Singapore
#1
Hey all! Im rather new to DSLR Photography, and now I'm trying to figure out which lens to get, especially for wildlife photography..

Right now, I'm mostly considering the
1. Tamron 18-400mm for a rather diverse range, and so I can bring just one lens overseas. Also, this is about half the price and weight of the other 2 lenses, meaning I could have slightly more money for a better tripod/bag/etc.

2. Tamron 150-600mm G1, which would mean a further range, but would require bringing one more lens overseas ie. Nikon 18-140

3. Sigma 150-600mm C, which may (?) produce a sharper picture than the Tamron at a slightly higher price.

Honestly, I'm not sure if the bringing of 2 lenses may be a factor to compare, but it's there too..
I'm trying to get the lens to bring to my trip to Australia this year end, so I could get some really clear images of the wildlife there..

If there are any other lenses I may have missed, do suggest it? Thanks a lot!

(Note: I'm currently using a D7200 with the 18-140mm kit lens provided, handheld)
 

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ziggy

Senior Member
May 24, 2006
830
4
18
East
#2
Since you already have the D7200 and 18-140, just get either of the zooms. I personally like the Sigma 150-600C better and the 150-600S even more. Try the used shops at Peninsula Shopping Centre/Adelphi area to see if any has these zooms, and save some money for maybe a decent tripod.
 

kcuf2

Senior Member
Dec 29, 2005
1,777
1
38
KFC
#3
get the 200-400mm f4. you wont regret it.
 

luckyorange

Senior Member
Jan 13, 2011
2,840
0
36
Ang Mo Kio
#4
Hey all! Im rather new to DSLR Photography, and now I'm trying to figure out which lens to get, especially for wildlife photography..

Right now, I'm mostly considering the
1. Tamron 18-400mm for a rather diverse range, and so I can bring just one lens overseas. Also, this is about half the price and weight of the other 2 lenses, meaning I could have slightly more money for a better tripod/bag/etc.

2. Tamron 150-600mm G1, which would mean a further range, but would require bringing one more lens overseas ie. Nikon 18-140

3. Sigma 150-600mm C, which may (?) produce a sharper picture than the Tamron at a slightly higher price.

Honestly, I'm not sure if the bringing of 2 lenses may be a factor to compare, but it's there too..
I'm trying to get the lens to bring to my trip to Australia this year end, so I could get some really clear images of the wildlife there..

If there are any other lenses I may have missed, do suggest it? Thanks a lot!

(Note: I'm currently using a D7200 with the 18-140mm kit lens provided, handheld)
You can consider getting a used nikon 200-500 too :) it's a pretty good lens
 

thoongeng

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2010
1,275
20
38
#5
I haven't got any of these super telephoto zooms, but have been researching around the topic to see which one to get so just sharing my findings rather than 1st hand experience:
- since you've got the Nikon system, I agree with luckyorange and would get the Nikon 200-500f5.6. It's made by Nikon so less compatibility issues, supposed to be able to track wildlife better and you can even use it with the Nikon 1.4x teleconvertor for acceptable results at 700mm. However it is a bit heavier and probably a bit more expensive. They should have a copy at the Nikon Service Centre for you to try out first, do call up just to confirm.


- Tamron 150-600 is supposedly sharper at 600mm at f8 compared to Sigma 156C but don't come with USB calibration just in case it has inaccurate focusing issues (G2 version has calibration though but will be more expensive). For me really hard to decide between these 2, but since Nikon 200-500mm came along that sounds like a better choice. But if you can get any of the Sigma or Tamron 150-600mm at a better price than the Nikon 200-500mm, just test them out and if good enough then why not?

- kcuf2 suggested 200-400f4, it's a good lens however I guess it will be out of your budget, and is heavier.

At the end of the day, as you are starting out, it is difficult to know exactly what you want and will make a bit of mistakes here and there. Most important is to get one and go out shooting then you will know what are your priorities. Take it as paying 'school fees' and enjoy your shooting!
 

Nikonzen

Senior Member
Nov 3, 2014
2,570
13
0
48
Oklahoma, USA
#6
A really wide focal range zoom like the tamron 18-400 will be the most challenging one to use effectively.

No matter what glass you better know your lens for such a trip. I would choose a 20 afd, a 50 afd, and a 300 manual focus ed prime (with tripod...thats the LR special duty kit...long range baby effective 450mm...put it on a 1.5 convertor and that sensor and glass will draw it good enough in the middle I bet) I would also pack a fast lens recent vintage p&s in hand at all times every waking moment (your spotter! very important on such a mission)....no phones...busy...but thats just me...haha
 

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dennisc

Senior Member
Oct 24, 2002
2,045
5
38
Freezing Upp Thomson/Mandai!
#7
Eh aside from long zooms u should be familiar with aperture, speed and isolation to use on such as it will cause blurry pics if u don't. Not ur average settings
 

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