Teddy bear test - which one gives the best effect?

Which one looks best?


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mpenza

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#1
Trying out a "teddy bear flash test". Which one do you feel gives the best results? All taken using the S602Z and Nikon SB24 at ISO200, F5.6, 1/250s.
(the messy bed was "cropped" out)

1. built-in flash


2. external flash, pointing directly


3. external flash, pointing 45 degrees up


4. external flash, pointing 90 degrees up
 

mpenza

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#2
5. external flash with omnibounce, pointing directly


6. external flash with omnibounce, pointing 45 degrees up


7. external flash with omnibounce, pointing 90 degrees up
 

mpenza

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#3
also, any idea why pics are underexposed when the flash is fired direct on with the omnibounce attached? I'm thinking that the diffused flash output confuses the flash sensor and cause the underexposure.
 

chenwei

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#5
2 is the best, but i find 6 is the most nature one, i will prefer 6... ;)

but it looks strange when omni-bounce directly point to the bear still get under-exposured... :what:
 

mpenza

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#7
Originally posted by maddog
Move closer to the bear. No. 2 is the best but still under.
thanks for the tips. it could be partly due to white wall which reflects more light than should be the case ;p Auto mode on the flash was used.

Originally posted by chenwei

but it looks strange when omni-bounce directly point to the bear still get under-exposured... :what:
Hope someone could give me pointers too....

Originally posted by Wolfgang
mpenza.. you notice a colour cast problem? :dunno:
yup. I used the auto white balance instead of setting a custom white balance. 2 and 6 look closest to the original color.
 

C

ches

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#8
i think with the omnibounce on the flash, it reduces the intensity of flash that's why its underexposed. I think the sensor senses first before it fires, so once fired there's no effect on the sensors. i usually use +1 compensation for bounce flash or flash with diffusers.
 

Zerstorer

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#9
Seems like most of the bounced shots are slightly underexposed. I would expect the bounced shots to look a lot better than this.

It seems funny that the direct omnibounce shot ended up so dark.....maybe the downward dispersion of the omni confused the flash sensor. You could try delibrately blocking the part of the omnibounce facing the flash sensor with an opaque material.
 

Zerstorer

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#10
The bounced shots would look better if they weren't underexposed as they will not have the harsh/hard shadows of a direct shot. You could try fiddling with the auto sensor aperture setting(if there is one) or give it some EV compensation.
 

mpenza

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#11
tested again with a different bear and different background (dark blue shirt).....
http://mpenza.clubsnap.org/view_album.php?set_albumName=flashtest

bounced shots are slightly underexposed.... guess have to compensate by 1/3(?) stop.

external flash direct on bear....


external flash 45 degrees


external flash with diffuser direct on (super underexposed)


external flash with diffuser 45 degrees
 

mpenza

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#12
Originally posted by Zerstorer
It seems funny that the direct omnibounce shot ended up so dark.....maybe the downward dispersion of the omni confused the flash sensor. You could try delibrately blocking the part of the omnibounce facing the flash sensor with an opaque material.
confirmed. due to the location of the sensor, the downward dispersion confused the sensor.
 

#13
Mpenza, I believe you are using the 602? 602 has no TTL, so I assume you are using the flash in Auto mode? In this mode, any stray light from the omnibounce is liable to hit the sensor, causing it to squelch the flash prematurely, causing underexposure. The Omnibounce website explicity warns against using it with non-TTL systems when firing straight on.

Regards
CK
 

mpenza

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#14
Thanks CK for the info :) yup, I'm using the flash in auto mode.

I've done a bit more tests... seems that I need to compensate by 1 stop to get proper exposure when bouncing. Flash is set to ISO 200, F8.0 with diffuser attached.


Camera: F5.6 (effectively +1.0EV). This looks better! Not as harsh as direct on flash.


Camera: F8.0 (no compensation)

Is it usual to have to compensate when bouncing?

In between compensation...

Camera: F6.3 (+2/3EV)

Camera: F7.0 (+1/3EV)
 

mpenza

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#16
Originally posted by ckiang
For TTL systems, you don't have to compensate. The TTL exposure system will auto compensate for the loss of light. For manual, you definitely have to. For Auto, you might have to.

Regards
CK
Thanks. Will keep these in mind :)
 

Zerstorer

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#18
On my 602/285Hv combo, you definitely have to compensate between bounced and direct shots. But once you dial in the correct settings you can just fire away and let the "auto" function do the work.
 

mpenza

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#19
Originally posted by Wolfgang
Mpenza... when you compensate, do you mean you settings in the S602 or on the SB24? :dunno:
I think either way is possible. I would tend to change the Aperture on the camera as it's faster and in smaller steps (1/3EV at a time, F5.6 changed to either F5 or F6.3). The flash will change one stop at a time (e.g. F5.6 change to either F4 or F8).
 

SNAG

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#20
Originally posted by ckiang
For TTL systems, you don't have to compensate. The TTL exposure system will auto compensate for the loss of light. For manual, you definitely have to. For Auto, you might have to.

Regards
CK
Just to ask you guys... If I am using a F80 with a SB22s or any Nikon flash, and I use a omnibounce, do I have to compensate?
 

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