Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?


ManWearPants

Senior Member
Jul 14, 2008
4,198
6
0
Singapore
#1
There are presently a lot of water filters that you can fix to tap or the pitcher. They claim to be able to filter among other things -
1) chlorine,
2) trihalomethanes,
3) industrial solvents,
4) pesticides,
5) rust, sand and sediments,
6) bad taste and odour.

One small filter can do so many things meh? So powderful!!!

OTOH, out tap water so dirty meh????

Any chemist, water expert or knowledgeable ones can provide any insights on whether these filters are the real thing or simply adding another impurity to our water - BS.
 

kei1309

Senior Member
Apr 12, 2010
7,312
23
0
Earth
www.facebook.com
#2
There are presently a lot of water filters that you can fix to tap or the pitcher. They claim to be able to filter among other things -
1) chlorine,
2) trihalomethanes,
3) industrial solvents,
4) pesticides,
5) rust, sand and sediments,
6) bad taste and odour.

One small filter can do so many things meh? So powderful!!!

OTOH, out tap water so dirty meh????

Any chemist, water expert or knowledgeable ones can provide any insights on whether these filters are the real thing or simply adding another impurity to our water - BS.
Pee through it and then drink the filtrate.

If it works, it works :)
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
12
0
#5
On a serious note, yeah, makes a difference. Especially to filter out rust and other fine particulates. And the water tastes a lot cleaner, it has less of a "processed" taste.

On just tap water, my water kettle would get a rust brown layer after about 3 months. After buying a filter, it has had no such issue.
 

ed9119

Moderator
Staff member
Mar 11, 2002
11,012
35
48
56
Singapore
www.walkeast.com
#6
boiled is the best

the filters remove physical particles , not dissolved stuff

some people even add a drop of water conditioner after boiling in an attempt to rid chlorine and chloramine
 

kklee

New Member
Aug 13, 2004
403
1
0
#8
There are presently a lot of water filters that you can fix to tap or the pitcher. They claim to be able to filter among other things -
1) chlorine,
2) trihalomethanes,
3) industrial solvents,
4) pesticides,
5) rust, sand and sediments,
6) bad taste and odour.

One small filter can do so many things meh? So powderful!!!

OTOH, out tap water so dirty meh????

Any chemist, water expert or knowledgeable ones can provide any insights on whether these filters are the real thing or simply adding another impurity to our water - BS.
As a user, after a lengthy discovery journey, filtered water or distilled water helps if one always seems to have throat dryness or related issues.

Here are two interesting reads I found while doing the "internet research".
PUB
NEL breakdowns
 

Last edited:
#9
boiled is the best

the filters remove physical particles , not dissolved stuff

some people even add a drop of water conditioner after boiling in an attempt to rid chlorine and chloramine
Boiling also doesn't remove "dissolved stuff" what, only purification such as distillation and reverse osmosis does that, it kills microorganism instead.
 

kklee

New Member
Aug 13, 2004
403
1
0
#10
Boiling also doesn't remove "dissolved stuff" what, only purification such as distillation and reverse osmosis does that, it kills microorganism instead.
I think the RO step will not removed "dissolved stuff" like e.g. chlorine.
 

ricohflex

Senior Member
Feb 24, 2005
3,353
8
38
sing
#11
Hot pots have a dechlorinate function. According to manufacturers, boiling can reduce it.

 

#12
I think the RO step will not removed "dissolved stuff" like e.g. chlorine.
Well, that depends on the specific definition of "dissolved stuff" by the OP but I do stand corrected anyway. :bsmilie:

I guessed, that's where activated carbon comes in unless one prefers to boil their kettle for 1/4 to 1/2 an hour instead of several minutes just so as to decrease the solubility enough for chlorine to evaporate off completely.
 

Last edited:

kklee

New Member
Aug 13, 2004
403
1
0
#13
Well, that depends on the specific definition of "dissolved stuff" by the OP but I do stand corrected anyway. :bsmilie:

I guessed, that's where activated carbon comes in unless one prefers to boil their kettle for 1/4 to 1/2 an hour instead of several minutes just so as to decrease the solubility enough for chlorine to evaporate off completely.
Which is precisely why I brought a filtered water pitcher to Egypt to filter their bottled water ! :)
 

ManWearPants

Senior Member
Jul 14, 2008
4,198
6
0
Singapore
#14
As a user, after a lengthy discovery journey, filtered water or distilled water helps if one always seems to have throat dryness or related issues.

Here are two interesting reads I found while doing the "internet research".
PUB
NEL breakdowns
The table shows the parameters that are within WHO guidelines. Also there is a wide range, eg PH is from 7-9.0 neutral to alkaline. And if you scroll to the very last item, there is now traces of E. Coli bacteria in our water. This probably comes from the sewage treated water. Also note the footnote:

"*** The residual chlorine present in tap water is in the form of chloramines "

Extracted from Wikipedia:
Drinking water disinfection [edit]

"NH2Cl is commonly used in low concentrations as a secondary disinfectant in municipal water distribution systems as an alternative to chlorination. This application is increasing. Chlorine (referred to in water treatment as free chlorine) is being displaced by chloramine--specifically monochloramine--which is much more stable and does not dissipate as rapidly as free chlorine. NH2Cl also has a very much lower, however still present, tendency than free chlorine to convert organic materials into chlorocarbons such as chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. Such compounds have been identified as carcinogens and in 1979 the United States Environmental Protection Agency began regulating their levels in U.S. drinking water.

Furthermore, water treated with chloramine lacks the distinct chlorine odour of the gaseous treatment and so has improved taste.[citation needed]

Some of the unregulated byproducts may possibly pose greater health risks than the regulated chemicals.[7]

Adding chloramine to the water supply may increase exposure to lead in drinking water, especially in areas with older housing; this exposure can result in increased lead levels in the bloodstream which may pose a significant health risk.[8]"

source: Chloramine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I am not a chemist but if what wiki writes is true, then having secondary filtration nor boiling may not help since chloramine don't get filtered mechanically nor dissipate off. Maybe I should try drinking Evian for a month to see if I there is any difference.
 

Last edited:

kklee

New Member
Aug 13, 2004
403
1
0
#15
The table shows the parameters that are within WHO guidelines. Also there is a wide range, eg PH is from 7-9.0 neutral to alkaline. And if you scroll to the very last item, there is now traces of E. Coli bacteria in our water. This probably comes from the sewage treated water. Also note the footnote:

*** The residual chlorine present in tap water is in the form of chloramines

Extracted from Wikipedia:
Drinking water disinfection [edit]

NH2Cl is commonly used in low concentrations as a secondary disinfectant in municipal water distribution systems as an alternative to chlorination. This application is increasing. Chlorine (referred to in water treatment as free chlorine) is being displaced by chloramine--specifically monochloramine--which is much more stable and does not dissipate as rapidly as free chlorine. NH2Cl also has a very much lower, however still present, tendency than free chlorine to convert organic materials into chlorocarbons such as chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. Such compounds have been identified as carcinogens and in 1979 the United States Environmental Protection Agency began regulating their levels in U.S. drinking water.

Furthermore, water treated with chloramine lacks the distinct chlorine odour of the gaseous treatment and so has improved taste.[citation needed]

Some of the unregulated byproducts may possibly pose greater health risks than the regulated chemicals.[7]

Adding chloramine to the water supply may increase exposure to lead in drinking water, especially in areas with older housing; this exposure can result in increased lead levels in the bloodstream which may pose a significant health risk.[8]

source: Chloramine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
And ?
 

ManWearPants

Senior Member
Jul 14, 2008
4,198
6
0
Singapore
#16
you missed this at the bottom
"I am not a chemist but if what wiki writes is true, then having secondary filtration nor boiling may not help since chloramine don't get filtered mechanically nor dissipate off. Maybe I should try drinking Evian for a month to see if I there is any difference. "
 

edutilos-

Senior Member
Dec 28, 2010
6,032
17
38
The Universe
www.facebook.com
#17
And if you scroll to the very last item, there is now traces of E. Coli bacteria in our water.
E. Coli (cfu/100 ml, 35°C, 24 hrs) < 1 means that there are less than 1 colony forming units in 100 ml of water, after being left at 35 degrees Celsius for 24 hours.

FYI, residual chlorine is included in drinking water to make it "biologically stable", i.e. unable to support microbial growth. There is a need for this given that the water isn't supplied direct from the waterworks and has to be conveyed via pipes, stored, etc.
 

hanzohattori

Senior Member
Apr 16, 2010
999
5
18
#18
Plus.. the wiki state that chloramine is neutralized by the digestive process. And Vit C completely neutralize both chlorine and chloramines.
 

kklee

New Member
Aug 13, 2004
403
1
0
#19
you missed this at the bottom
"I am not a chemist but if what wiki writes is true, then having secondary filtration nor boiling may not help since chloramine don't get filtered mechanically nor dissipate off. Maybe I should try drinking Evian for a month to see if I there is any difference. "
Perhaps I have missed out.
I reply to you at 10:10.
Your last edit was at 10:15.

My understanding is that activated carbon can be used to remove the chloramine.
The filter in the water pitcher I use (Hyflux) have activated carbon.
How effective and efficient is the removal of the chloramine, I really have no idea which is why I never use chloramine as an example in the "dissolved stuffs".

I would say I sort of agree with your statement at the bottom. Waiting for your "report" on differences (if any) on Evian.
 

kklee

New Member
Aug 13, 2004
403
1
0
#20
I just want to add that personally, if there exists too many unknowns and if the attempts to overcome proves to be futile,
I will make an effort to remove the unknown from the equation.

I am happy user of the Hyflux water pitcher and bottled distilled water. :)

Whether it will work for you, you can try to find out.
 

Top Bottom