Taking straight photographs


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Tantalize

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Mar 18, 2009
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#1
I'm trying to take a picture of a paintings and wondering if there a way to take it in a way that the edge of the photograph is straight?
 

May 11, 2008
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#3
you can also change focusing screen with grid lines, it helps alot.
 

zac08

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Feb 21, 2005
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#4
If you're talking about the parralax error, then you may need a tilt shift lens or shoot from dead centre and correct the slight distortions in CS.
 

Aug 8, 2008
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#6
Assuming if the painting is hung on a wall, then a tripod and a spirit level are necessary. More care must be given if paiting is left standing on floor and resting on wall; in this case the tilt must be corrected by having the lens pointing perpendicularly (or sensor plane at parallel) at the centre of the painting. Some perspective corrections can also be done on Photoshop. Good luck.
 

reachme2003

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Oct 6, 2003
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#11
for a start, ensure you use a tripod with a head(both with spirit level).
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#13
I'm trying to take a picture of a paintings and wondering if there a way to take it in a way that the edge of the photograph is straight?
1. find lens with minimal distortion (barrel or pincushion), if cannot, then make sure you know how to correct, and shoot so that you will correct without cropping away parts of painting.

2. make sure your lens fits the setting (i.e. amount of space) where you have to take the photo of painting.

3. be dead centre of painting, both horizontally and vertically.

4. take photo with camera sensor exactly parallel to painting's verticality

5. take photo with camera sensor exactly parallel to painting's horizontality

6. tada.

alternatively, with some mild errors you can correct in photoshop, but image quality will be affected, and you might need to crop, so shoot for cropping.
 

Dream Merchant

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Jan 11, 2007
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#14
the most pro option :thumbsup:
Also the easiest.

But most likely, not many have access or know how to use a technical camera.

Using the detailed set-up previously described, there's a very easy way to set up a normal camera to ensure that one's camera is almost perfectly squared on both planes. A grid reference in the viewfinder helps, but is not necessary.

It's so easy, quick and cheap, it's mind-boggling. Not to taunt TS, but let's see if anyone can figure it out without googling. ;)
 

ortega

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Nov 2, 2004
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#15
Also the easiest.

But most likely, not many have access or know how to use a technical camera.

Using the detailed set-up previously described, there's a very easy way to set up a normal camera to ensure that one's camera is almost perfectly squared on both planes. A grid reference in the viewfinder helps, but is not necessary.

It's so easy, quick and cheap, it's mind-boggling. Not to taunt TS, but let's see if anyone can figure it out without googling. ;)
er.... it's called a flat bed scanner
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#16
Also the easiest.

But most likely, not many have access or know how to use a technical camera.

Using the detailed set-up previously described, there's a very easy way to set up a normal camera to ensure that one's camera is almost perfectly squared on both planes. A grid reference in the viewfinder helps, but is not necessary.

It's so easy, quick and cheap, it's mind-boggling. Not to taunt TS, but let's see if anyone can figure it out without googling. ;)
Chey, this simple method I already use it 20years ago, just put a piece a mirror lor.

it is not a rocket science, anybody have secondary school physics level can understand why.
 

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Dream Merchant

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Jan 11, 2007
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#18
Chey, this simple method I already use it 20years ago, just put a piece a mirror lor.

it is not a rocket science, anybody have secondary school physics level can understand why.
Alamak!

I should have put the condition 'Catchlights is not allowed to answer' because I know he definitely knows the answer! :bsmilie: :bsmilie: :bsmilie:
 

yqt

Senior Member
Sep 8, 2004
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#19
I'm trying to take a picture of a paintings and wondering if there a way to take it in a way that the edge of the photograph is straight?
first check that the edges are straight and parallel.

Too many times photographers and art directors got stucked just because the orginal itself is not straight and parallel.
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#20
Alamak!

I should have put the condition 'Catchlights is not allowed to answer' because I know he definitely knows the answer! :bsmilie: :bsmilie: :bsmilie:
back in the 80's when there is no scanner, we still able to charge $15~$35 per piece for doing simple flat copywork, things are rather easy when we can use a copy stand, just use a carpenter spirit level on the board and a spirit level on 120 camera back or 35mm hotshoe, but works get complicated when the art work too large, need to paste on the wall or place on the floor.

so I get headache of how to get perfect perpendicular, and later I discover I can just simply use a mirror to check perpendicular, and it works wonders. And strangely, I can't find this method mention in all the photography books I came across, when I share this tips to other photographers, and they disbelieve it at first, but proved it is a simple method once they try it out.
 

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