Taking pictures in low light.


Status
Not open for further replies.

dorts

Senior Member
Mar 10, 2007
2,203
1
38
SG
#1
Hello all,

I am having difficulty taking pictures in low light. It was after the rain and the sky was overcast. Tried to take some pictures of raindrops on the leaf and it wasn't successful. I didn't want to use flash so I tried without. But it was quite dark and windy. So the shutter speed was slow. So when I snap (with tripod), it was blur, because the leaf was moving. I didn't want to increase the ISO too much as it will get noisy. :) I went to max ISO 400 and still couldn't get a decent shutter speed. The leaf will still be blur. Any ideas how would I go about snapping it? :D
 

Scaglietti

New Member
Jan 14, 2005
1,541
0
0
#2
Hello all,

I am having difficulty taking pictures in low light. It was after the rain and the sky was overcast. Tried to take some pictures of raindrops on the leaf and it wasn't successful. I didn't want to use flash so I tried without. But it was quite dark and windy. So the shutter speed was slow. So when I snap (with tripod), it was blur, because the leaf was moving. I didn't want to increase the ISO too much as it will get noisy. :) I went to max ISO 400 and still couldn't get a decent shutter speed. The leaf will still be blur. Any ideas how would I go about snapping it? :D
Either find some way to stop the leaf from swaying or use flash. Can't really think about any way else.

BC
 

dorts

Senior Member
Mar 10, 2007
2,203
1
38
SG
#4
Aww. Sad. I was using my 40-150mm to snap. :bsmilie: Maybe I can ask the wind to stop blowing.
 

holidaydom

New Member
Aug 18, 2006
941
0
0
#5
Hi there fellow Oly bro *waves*

Increasing the ISO will only help so much and I agree with you on a max ISO of 400 cos of the noise issue.

I think you're only left with a couple of choices if you don't want to use flash.

1) Use the biggest aperature available (but you'll loose depth of field)

2) Steady the leaf using some kind of holder that's gentle on the plant
(check out this product called the "Plamp")

3) Use something to block the wind (large piece of cardboard, jacket, a small elephant, etc...)
 

Scaglietti

New Member
Jan 14, 2005
1,541
0
0
#6
Why you do not want to use the flash? Correct use of flash in macro photography produces very nice photos.

BC
 

dorts

Senior Member
Mar 10, 2007
2,203
1
38
SG
#8
Thank you everyone. Using an Elephant is sure a good way to block wind. Unless it farts. LOL. :bsmilie:

After taking a look at the pictures I took with flash(I did take some), it looks fine, do you feel the flash is too harsh? Take a look. :)

 

holidaydom

New Member
Aug 18, 2006
941
0
0
#10
Looking at your perspective in that pic:

1) Using the 40-150 was a good choice cos it gives you more distance to get the flash in there. Try to diffuse the flash by using a bounce card (white piece of paper) see how it goes...

2) You can also try you other kit lens, the 14-45, it's slightly brighter than the 40-150 but not by much. Remember that with the 14-45 you'll be much closer and so your flash will be more "harsh" so to speak.

If you have the FL-36 or the FL-50 you can try flipping down the wide-angle filter... ;)

Alternatively, you can train an elephant to hold a light for you! :bsmilie:
 

dorts

Senior Member
Mar 10, 2007
2,203
1
38
SG
#11
1/2) LOL. I just realised that picture was using the 14-15mm lens. Hehe. And bounce card? Just any white piece of paper, do what? Haha.

I don't have $$ to buy FL-36/50. :cry:

About the elephant, I'll see if I can ask him to hold a light for me, without me being stepped on. :think:

I got a 40-150mm picture if you want.
 

hacknet

New Member
Mar 20, 2007
1,245
0
0
29
#12
i think you should use your flash.. i just found out how helpful flash can be especially when there's low light. get a flash diffussor and you will find your flash much softer..
 

cantaresg

New Member
Feb 23, 2007
765
0
0
Woodlands
#13
Ya. Probably the diffuser can help soften the shadows too. Sorry just find that the shadow is rather unwanted.
 

Jan 14, 2005
1,541
0
0
#14
Thank you everyone. Using an Elephant is sure a good way to block wind. Unless it farts. LOL. :bsmilie:

After taking a look at the pictures I took with flash(I did take some), it looks fine, do you feel the flash is too harsh? Take a look. :)

This is a quite decent photo. You could have repositioned the leaf such that the branch is out of the background and, thus, you do not see the hard shadow cast. You can also use PS to remove it.

If your system allow, try using remote flash. Using diffusor and bouncing can be good solutions to soften the lighting. Try playing with flash exposure compensation, to increase/reduce the flash exposure.

You can also shoot in M exposure mode if the flash is TTL. Meter the ambient light in your camera, the TTL flash should adjust the strength by itself to expose the subject. By metering the ambient light, you can either increase or reduce the ambient light in relation to your subject according to your preference.

BC
 

tltan

Senior Member
Apr 18, 2005
2,484
0
0
www.flickr.com
#18
Patience is the key to this issue. Shooting with flash takes away some natural coloration and shadows that you might want to present (and give you ugly shadows unless its diffused nicely). Either wait for the wind to stop blowing or block the wind.

Otherwise, use a flash with diffuser or get a diffuser for your built-in flash. Think that might work in reducing harsh shadows. Think you can get those for 12 bucks from Perly or PQ23 in here. But I havent use it, my friend has and it seems to work.

good luck. Good try on the flash part on ur picture!
 

dorts

Senior Member
Mar 10, 2007
2,203
1
38
SG
#19
Thank you all for your great suggestions. I'll see what I can do. :)
 

lkkang

Senior Member
Jan 6, 2007
2,946
3
0
46
Punggol 21
#20
I always carry some pegs ( used for hanging cloths ) around when shooting leaves. Use the pegs to secure the subject..to your tripot. :bsmilie: Choose those bigger diameter ones.. not the wooden ones.
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom