Taking photos for deli Menu


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#1
Hi all,

I've been asked to help out a friend to take some photos of food for his deli menu. Need some advice on what I need to have, need to do, etc. I own a Canon 350D with kit lens, a 28-105 lens and an external flash on loan from my bro-in-law. I'm kinda new in photography, so appreciate any help I can get. ;) Thanks in advance.

paul
 

Stratix

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Oct 13, 2005
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#2
i guess macros are the way to go, try a few new angles for close ups... =)

in my opinion, the kit lens should be good enough...
 

elfvin

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Oct 29, 2005
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Bukit Panjang
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#4
i think food usually appears SOFT. i think i think. i saw pictures on food photography and mostly are soft. and i read a little on food photography, closed up attracts people to look at the pictures.

flash? bounced it!
 

Adiemus

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May 21, 2004
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#5
I prefer to use the 50mm f/1.8 for these kinda shots.
Given a choice, I would mount it on a tripod and shoot using ambient light.
If flash is required, use bounce or use a diffuser.
 

elfvin

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#6
I prefer to use the 50mm f/1.8 for these kinda shots.
Given a choice, I would mount it on a tripod and shoot using ambient light.
If flash is required, use bounce or use a diffuser.
yeah, doing outside your window is the best when the sunlight is the strongest! :)
 

VR Man

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Nov 21, 2005
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#8
Go to your local library or book store and get a book on food photography read up.

Your kit lens cannot make it. Better buy, borrow or loan a prime macro lens.

Get a reflector, 1-2 lights and tracing paper.

You should get someone who can style your food.

Have fun :)
 

Del_CtrlnoAlt

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Feb 15, 2003
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Outside the Dry Box.
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#9
do a search... tis has been repeated over many times...

anyway, if u wan professional results, i guess u won't get it, cos 1 flash isn't gonna help much but probably add that 'artistic' shot since might even over color or have underexposure, u won't really get a well even lighting.

then your lens might not be able to deliver...

then since u never shoot before... u can take 100 test shots and not satisfied by 1...
 

#10
Go to your local library or book store and get a book on food photography read up.

Your kit lens cannot make it. Better buy, borrow or loan a prime macro lens.

Get a reflector, 1-2 lights and tracing paper.

You should get someone who can style your food.

Have fun :)
I beg to differ. The kit lens will do it fine.

Its not really the equipment, more the person using it. Buying or borrowing a lens may help if you know what your going to do with it, otherwise whats the point?

The kit lens will do the job well.
 

VR Man

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Nov 21, 2005
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#12
I beg to differ. The kit lens will do it fine.

Its not really the equipment, more the person using it. Buying or borrowing a lens may help if you know what your going to do with it, otherwise whats the point?

The kit lens will do the job well.
I agree with you that for most people starting out, getting a better lens may not be more of a help and may get in the way. So the kit lens is fine for that situation.

I also think you will agree with me that once you have more experience, you will want to find something better than the kit lens to get better control and results. I was looking at it from this perspective.
 

#13
I agree with you that for most people starting out, getting a better lens may not be more of a help and may get in the way. So the kit lens is fine for that situation.

I also think you will agree with me that once you have more experience, you will want to find something better than the kit lens to get better control and results. I was looking at it from this perspective.
Not to start a fight or anything, but thats the wrong perspective in my opinion for the TS.
 

VR Man

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Nov 21, 2005
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#14
Not to start a fight or anything, but thats the wrong perspective in my opinion for the TS.
I also don't want a fight or anything :)

But I think we are both confusing the TS at the rate we are going :bsmilie:
 

#15
I also don't want a fight or anything :)

But I think we are both confusing the TS at the rate we are going :bsmilie:
Ok, shall stop then :)

Ok, id say, just use natural light, use the 105 end to get in close and capture the texture (not too close though) shoot from a 45 degree angle (roughly, apparently this is how we view food usually, so its looks the most appealing) and a tripod is a must, ive never really been a fan of using flash for still life, natural light just tends to look very good.
 

Volks

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May 17, 2006
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#16
Don't want fight fight.

Think don't try on your own, spend $, hire the person good at it. It's business afterall.Be Professional. Bet U won't want to do silly things to your car if it breaks down & U still insist to try try.:lovegrin:
 

#18
WOW! Great tips guys! I think i'll need to digest these slowly and work on them. I'll try to post the pics once they're done. By the way, pardon my ignorance but, what's a light tent?

paul
 

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