Taking fast motion pictures


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Blitz

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#1
Hi all,

I've got some enquiries on taking fast motion pictures. I've seen from my Oly manual that if I were to take subjects tat are moving, I should use a faster shutter speed.

I have some queries though:

- Is there any standard shutter speed to take for eg, like a moving dog or ppl moving without the blurry effect?

- For my camera (I think it's the same for all cameras?), I have to press halfway down first to lock the focus and exposure, wait for a green light to confirm it is lock, then I press all the way in order for the picture to be taken. If so, this will be quite slow liao. So should I even lock focus in the first place?

Thanks for any help and tips!
 

Jayan

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#2
Originally posted by Blitz
Hi all,

I've got some enquiries on taking fast motion pictures. I've seen from my Oly manual that if I were to take subjects tat are moving, I should use a faster shutter speed.

I have some queries though:

- Is there any standard shutter speed to take for eg, like a moving dog or ppl moving without the blurry effect?

- For my camera (I think it's the same for all cameras?), I have to press halfway down first to lock the focus and exposure, wait for a green light to confirm it is lock, then I press all the way in order for the picture to be taken. If so, this will be quite slow liao. So should I even lock focus in the first place?

Thanks for any help and tips!
) The rule of thumb for shutter speed is usually --> 1/focal length (35mm equivalent) sec, to avoid motion blur i.e. for taking at 38mm then the slowest shutter speed have to be at least 1/38 sec.

But for faster moving subjects you'll have to use a much faster shutter speed to freeze the motion, and use a smaller F-stop (sometimes plus flash or up the ISO) to make up for the correct exposure.

2) U using C-2040z right? Got full-time AF? If yes use it to enable a faster AF time. If not then will have to use the manul functions or AF/AE lock (i.e.hlf-depress button).
 

Fundee

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#3
depending the distance of the subject.........i usually manual focus for the not so far and do a hyperfocal-focussing for subject distance subjects such as ...air-show ect.
 

Blitz

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#4
Thanks Jayan and Fundee!

Hmm... Jayan, but won't tuning up the ISO makes the picture grainy? I try it once on night shots so I'm not too sure on ISO settings.

As for manual focus, fundee sorry what do you mean by hyperfocal ah? Means focus it further or?

Thanks!
 

Jayan

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#5
Originally posted by Blitz
Thanks Jayan and Fundee!

Hmm... Jayan, but won't tuning up the ISO makes the picture grainy? I try it once on night shots so I'm not too sure on ISO settings.

As for manual focus, fundee sorry what do you mean by hyperfocal ah? Means focus it further or?

Thanks!
Yes....turning up the ISO add more noise.....but will also let u take those shots that'll otherwise require a much slower shutter. Pros and cons again...u gain some u lose some.
 

Jed

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Standard shutter speed: I'm sure there's a list somewhere, but I don't have the reference off hand. If you're after something specific, let me know. I think generally photographers just go by experience. It depends a lot on the type of movement, whether it is passing across you, heading towards/away you, or a mixture of both. It also depends on how far away you are from the movement, and how long a lens you have on. Being closer/longer lens will exaggerate the movement.

The rule of thumb Jayan quoted is what is normally used to stop handshake -- as in movement imparted by the photographer. To stop subject motion blur completely depends on the speed of the subject and other factors detailed above.

Hyperfocal focusing means to focus at a given distance at a given aperture to maximise the front to back plane of sharpness. It means you don't necessarily concentrate on focusing on your main subject, but focus to get maximum DOF from X distance to infinity, which means that anything within that area will be sharp and you won't have to bother focusing within that range.
 

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