Tactics or Filters for street photography


wedoodle

New Member
Apr 13, 2011
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#1
Hi guys

Currently im using uv filter on sigma 50mm 1.4 for my day streets. And i usually shoot at f2 on aperture piority mode. I realised that my background are overexpose.

Is it smth wrong with my tactics or shld i use a polarize filters to step down?
 

alancwr

New Member
Sep 23, 2007
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#2
I don't think uv will affect dslr bah??
If u are on av mode shouldn't be overexposed?u got adjust ur iso also? To maybe the lowest on a bright day?
 

rhino123

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Staff member
Sep 1, 2006
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#3
Please show us a photo or none of us will know how to advise... and all answers will be based on guesswork which can be grossly mistaken or wrong.
 

catchlights

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Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
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#4
Since you are shooting at A / AV mode, add any filters, or even ND110 or ND400 will still overexposed.

The problem is not about filter, Please read the book tilte of Understanding of Exposure, by Bryan Petersons.

Hope this help.
 

Blur Shadow

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2005
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#5
Sounds like an exposure issue.
 

pinholecam

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Staff member
Jul 23, 2007
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#6
Its just an exposure issue.
If your subject is in the shade, when you expose of it, the areas not in the shade (eg. bkgnd) will likely be overexposed.

Another possibility may be that when shooting near to wide open, you have hit the cameras max shutter limit (on lower end models, its usually 1/4000).
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#7
please post a sample pic. Chances are it's just metering.

But if you are shooting in daylight with f/2, you may be hitting your shutter speed limits.
 

wedoodle

New Member
Apr 13, 2011
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#8
Cant post now cos im on my iphone.

But it mus be e iso, cos it was at 400 when i took the shoots.

I will try at iso 100 again.

Thanks guys.
 

NikF601

Senior Member
Jul 26, 2010
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#9
Since you are shooting at A / AV mode, add any filters, or even ND110 or ND400 will still overexposed.

The problem is not about filter, Please read the book tilte of Understanding of Exposure, by Bryan Petersons.

Hope this help.
:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

NikF601

Senior Member
Jul 26, 2010
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#10
Hi guys

Currently im using uv filter on sigma 50mm 1.4 for my day streets. And i usually shoot at f2 on aperture piority mode. I realised that my background are overexpose.

Is it smth wrong with my tactics or shld i use a polarize filters to step down?
Which cam you are using ? So that we have help on the settings for different cam...
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#12
Which cam you are using ? So that we have help on the settings for different cam...
The basics of exposure are the same regardless of the camera.
 

sanfong

New Member
Dec 4, 2007
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#13
I usually dun use max f for street photography. When taking street photography, the most important element is the moment. Bokeh is secondary or in fact its not important. Because lighting condition keeps changing as you travel, sometimes moment can happen indoor (example inside a shop) or subject is under a tree, or in open space.

f2 in Aperture priority will handicap you, cos you have no time to stop up or down for all the ever changing lighting conditions and moments.

Set it to program mode and ISO 400, give a try. ;) I know some pros use it too!

But dun get too used to program mode for other type of photography. Gotta learn the basic well too.
 

Last edited:

cks2k2

New Member
Feb 12, 2009
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#14
F/8 and be there.
 

avsquare

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2012
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#15
f/2 with ISO 400 in board daylight is too overpowering for most of the time isn't it? :think:

I find myself already using shutter speeds like 1/500 or 1/1000 at ISO100, f/4 and narrower for landscape/street at mid-day already :bsmilie:

Given 1/500, ISO100 @ f/4, then @ f2, ISO400 = 16x more light (four times from ISO and four times from aperture), which means you need 16x shutter speed increase from 1/500 which theoratically meant 1/8000. And this is the max shutter speed most consumer/prosumer DSLR can hit.

Hope the above example will let you know why you have overexposures. You have to consider changing your exposure settings and (not sure about 600D, nv use before) if your cam has hightone priority, you may use it in certain situations.
 

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