Swerve


Jan 3, 2011
58
0
6
#1

Swerve by Plabir, on Flickr

1. Areas for critique
Composition and overall effect.

2. What I am trying to achieve through the picture
The photo is slanted as I am trying to achieve the effect on an upward climb. I have always thought that railroads are contrasted to the path of life, so this is what I am trying to contrast it to. That life is an upward struggle, and that you can't see what's after the bend.

3. Under what circumstances was this photo taken?
Before the KTM railway track was closed. I had to wait for quite a bit to make sure that nobody was walking on the bend or approaching from the bend.

4.what the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture
I like it because I feel the subject and the mood goes well together, but I think that the bokeh at the front is a bit distracting.
 

Jan 3, 2011
58
0
6
#2
Any comments? ):
It would be greatly appreciated, I'm still learning and I really wish to know how I can improve.
 

wxzhuo

New Member
Oct 31, 2010
83
0
0
Singapore
xlightphotography.com
#3
Railroads have good lead-in line, but unfortunately, slanted photos rarely work well for me.
I don't see an upward climb, just a curved railroad taken at an awkward angle.

Do keep in mind that the natural reaction of most people to slanted photos will be - turn the photo around, or tilt head.
Unless you deliberately want people to tilt or rotate to see the photo in different lights, refrain from tilting needlessly...

Overall interesting thought, but it's a fail for me.
 

Jan 3, 2011
58
0
6
#4
Railroads have good lead-in line, but unfortunately, slanted photos rarely work well for me.
I don't see an upward climb, just a curved railroad taken at an awkward angle.

Do keep in mind that the natural reaction of most people to slanted photos will be - turn the photo around, or tilt head.
Unless you deliberately want people to tilt or rotate to see the photo in different lights, refrain from tilting needlessly...

Overall interesting thought, but it's a fail for me.
Alright, thanks for the tip.
Will keep trying. Thank you for viewing.
 

Mar 13, 2010
522
0
0
Singapore (Ulu Pandan)
#5
my opinion is that the framing is pretty interesting, the tilt adds a sense of dynamism as opposed to a "corrected" shot, so kudos to you. would very very much prefer more contrast in the B&W conversion though. the rather flat tones don't bring out the same feeling of dynamism & impact that the tilt is conveying. I would also add vignetting during post-processing, but that's just how i would personally do it.

p.s. can't really relate the photo to your description, maybe that's just me.
 

Last edited:

CamInit

Senior Member
Nov 3, 2009
758
0
16
#6
I find uphill straight-on shots are not that straightforward to take, often you need some element to contrast against the gradient else it may be mistaken for camera tilt forwards/backwards. In this case, you are artificially putting a tilt towards the right which doesn't help and becomes distracting. The plants in the background are tilted as well. If they were vertical then maybe you can get the point across.
:)
 

Jan 3, 2011
58
0
6
#7
my opinion is that the framing is pretty interesting, the tilt adds a sense of dynamism as opposed to a "corrected" shot, so kudos to you. would very very much prefer more contrast in the B&W conversion though. the rather flat tones don't bring out the same feeling of dynamism & impact that the tilt is conveying. I would also add vignetting during post-processing, but that's just how i would personally do it.

p.s. can't really relate the photo to your description, maybe that's just me.
Thank you for your kind comments and feedback!
Yes, post processing is something that I am very unfamiliar with, but I guess it's part and parcel of photography nowadays. Thank you for your suggestion, I will attempt to try it.

It's alright, the description is pretty hazy anyway. XD

I find uphill straight-on shots are not that straightforward to take, often you need some element to contrast against the gradient else it may be mistaken for camera tilt forwards/backwards. In this case, you are artificially putting a tilt towards the right which doesn't help and becomes distracting. The plants in the background are tilted as well. If they were vertical then maybe you can get the point across.
:)
I never took the point about the plants into consideration, and yes, now that I see it, it is very distracting.

Thank you for your valuable insight. :)


Thanks for viewing and CC. :)
 

foxtwo

Senior Member
Mar 11, 2004
2,523
0
36
singapore
#8
Since the vegetation is an issue, I find if you crop it off it can quite a nice abstract.

Forget the deeper meanings about life etc etc.

Push the abstract angle. Go closer, with the right processing while wont be a masterpiece still can make something out of it.
 

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