Sunrise and sunset


gary11166

New Member
May 3, 2011
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#1
I need some advise from the field as to how take photo for the above.
I managed to take the picture of the sun very clearly but the object before the sun is very dark.
I'm using nikon 7000.

Thanks.
 

tecnica

Senior Member
Dec 26, 2004
3,660
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#2
photography rule number 1: what you see IS NOT what you will get

our human eyes far supercede the dynamic range of the camera.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
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rainy Singapore
#3
I need some advise from the field as to how take photo for the above.
I managed to take the picture of the sun very clearly but the object before the sun is very dark.
I'm using nikon 7000.

Thanks.
Read up about 'Dynamic Range' :)
 

rhino123

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 1, 2006
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#4
Take two photo... one with good exposure of the sun and another with good exposure on the background or the rest of the photo, then merge the two together using photoshop.
 

MatCh

New Member
Aug 2, 2007
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#5
i would most likely use a GND filter for this case.
 

Jul 1, 2011
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#6
Yh get some basic filters like UV/CPL filters, these two filters can stop some light
 

coolthought

Senior Member
Jun 23, 2008
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#7
I need some advise from the field as to how take photo for the above.
I managed to take the picture of the sun very clearly but the object before the sun is very dark.
I'm using nikon 7000.

Thanks.
what you have is a silhouette photo. Object is back lit by the sun.
this happen when the camera try to meter to get the sky (with the sun) which occupy a significant area of the photo, properly exposed. As mentioned, what you see isn't really what the camera capture as there is a significant difference in dynamic range of the two that is able to capture.

What you can do is just take nice photo of the silhouette or try to get the shot when the sun still very very low in the horizon or use the method above or use flash (if possible) or use reflector (if possible) or move yourself so the object will be front lit by the sun or you can compensate to have the subject correctly exposed with the sky blown or meter the exposure on the subject and have the sky blown or wait for an extremely hazy morning or evening....etc
 

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mazeppa26

New Member
Dec 28, 2005
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#8
yups HDR is something fun to play with :)
 

LFC25

New Member
Mar 20, 2011
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#9
I need some advise from the field as to how take photo for the above.
I managed to take the picture of the sun very clearly but the object before the sun is very dark.
I'm using nikon 7000.

Thanks.
Use fill light if the foreground object is near to the camera....
 

Octarine

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Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#10
Yh get some basic filters like UV/CPL filters, these two filters can stop some light
Please explain how you would use these filters in this situation :) Especially what you expect from the UV filter.
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#11
Yh get some basic filters like UV/CPL filters, these two filters can stop some light
the UV filter are use as protective filter, serve no purpose,

the polarizing filter work best when the sun is perpendicular with lens axis, it can cut down some light but it is on overall area, it will not help here.
 

catchlights

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Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
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#12
basically for Sunrise and sunset shots, more like silhouette photos, you need to find suitable subjects to give the interesting outline.

some thing like these,








if you need to let the foreground have details, you can look for natural fill, like tall trees behind you, or use ND graduate filters,
or photoshop it
but personally, I rather to leave it dark if the foreground is not interesting.

hope this help.
 

MatCh

New Member
Aug 2, 2007
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#14
It doesn't work in many many situations, especially with odd-shaped transitions (eg. cityscape, architectural, etc)
that i understand, but referring to the topic from TS "Sunrise and sunset" as general, i think GND is pretty much necessary.
If the question was cityscape/buildings appearing too dark, then i'd agree that GND would unlikely to work.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
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#15
that i understand, but referring to the topic from TS "Sunrise and sunset" as general, i think GND is pretty much necessary.
If the question was cityscape/buildings appearing too dark, then i'd agree that GND would unlikely to work.
Agree with your point.
Though your statement wasn't entirely clear in the first place. "Sunrise and sunset" is rather general, and could encompass a cityscape during that timing, in which case a GND is not quite "pretty much necessary".

:)
 

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MatCh

New Member
Aug 2, 2007
75
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#18
well...there are usually more than 1 way to take a picture, depending on the desired output...
I prefer to think and plan before I go out to shoot, think about the subject, background, weather, equipment, etc...

Plain sunset/sunrise scenery, i'd bring GND.
Portrait with sunset backdrop, bring external flash and reflectors?
maybe silhouette if i don't have the accessories.

for ZerocoolAstra's case, i rather just take silhouette, since i don't do HDR and don't like pp.

ya but then how do you deal with the GND transition line not coinciding with the buildings?
I will still use GND if I want to keep the buildings in silhouette :p
I don't think GND will work nicely, unless there is a foreground infront of the building?
i'd usually rather just take silhouette without GND even with foreground tho...
 

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Cowseye

Senior Member
Mar 7, 2010
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#19
ZerocoolAstra said:
ya but then how do you deal with the GND transition line not coinciding with the buildings?
Pull my GND lower. Keep transition line on the horizon. The whole idea why I would do this is becos I'm gonna leave everything above the horizon in black while able to darken the sky behind it. Of cos, this is assuming there's nothing else that I also need to darken below the horizon.

I also dun mean it works out every time in scenes with building. But I'll try if possible.
 

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ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
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0
rainy Singapore
#20
well...there are usually more than 1 way to take a picture, depending on the desired output...
I prefer to think and plan before I go out to shoot, think about the subject, background, weather, equipment, etc...

Plain sunset/sunrise scenery, i'd bring GND.
Portrait with sunset backdrop, bring external flash and reflectors?
maybe silhouette if i don't have the accessories.

for ZerocoolAstra's case, i rather just take silhouette, since i don't do HDR and don't like pp.





I don't think GND will work nicely, unless there is a foreground infront of the building?
i'd usually rather just take silhouette without GND even with foreground tho...
But many buildings (especially in densely built-up Singapore) don't look nice as silhouettes. Ends up just as one black mess. It will detract from the photo, no matter how beautiful the sunset/sunrise is ;)
 

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