Sunny f/16 and f/22 Rule


Status
Not open for further replies.

excelglsi

Deregistered
Oct 11, 2005
1,693
0
0
CCK-Yew Tee
#1
Anyone can care to explain the above.. After reading i still dont understand...:embrass:

Sorry iam slow on all this tech stuff... Pls help.. Dont ask mi go to library to borrow books on tat... :nono: Thanks
 

lsisaxon

Senior Member
Nov 29, 2004
11,941
0
0
#2
Anyone can care to explain the above.. After reading i still dont understand...:embrass:

Sorry iam slow on all this tech stuff... Pls help.. Dont ask mi go to library to borrow books on tat... :nono: Thanks
If I'm not mistaken, Sunny-16 rule is like this.. if it's a bright sunny day, set aperture to f/16, if you use ISO100, shoot at 1/100, ISO200, shoot at 1/200 etc...

If you need to use other aperture, then for every stop you open up or close down, increase or decrease the shutter speed by a stop also. eg, for ISO100. f/11 -> 1/200, f/8 -> 1/400, f/5.6 -> 1/800.
 

gohaj

Senior Member
Nov 9, 2005
3,805
0
0
#3
Anyone can care to explain the above.. After reading i still dont understand...:embrass:

Sorry iam slow on all this tech stuff... Pls help.. Dont ask mi go to library to borrow books on tat... :nono: Thanks
are u using manual camera/lens?
In a sunny day, you can set f16 and 1/100 shutter speed using ISO100. This is just an estimate and it will not be as accurate as your matrix metering in your dSLR.
 

antitrust

New Member
Sep 25, 2004
317
0
0
#4
If you need to use other aperture, then for every stop you open up or close down, increase or decrease the shutter speed by a stop also. eg, for ISO100. f/11 -> 1/200, f/8 -> 1/400, f/5.6 -> 1/800.
technically, you are right.

however, the sunny 16 rule is to make guessing exposures much simpler by only allowing the aperture to be the only variable. :)

for the TS: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunny_16_rule

hope this helps! :)
 

gohaj

Senior Member
Nov 9, 2005
3,805
0
0
#5
however, the sunny 16 rule is to make guessing exposures much simpler by only allowing the aperture to be the only variable. :)
Actually I change both aperture and shutter speed. Will change the shutter speed to 1/focal length where necessary.
 

Camm

New Member
Sep 4, 2002
305
0
0
Visit site
#6
I just borrowed photography book from library this evening...it does explained sunny f/16. But what's f/22 Rule?
 

ihub88

New Member
Mar 3, 2007
586
0
0
#8
i thought any setting also works one?
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
11,755
0
0
East
#9
I know the other one though...

F8 and be there...:bsmilie: :bsmilie:
 

excelglsi

Deregistered
Oct 11, 2005
1,693
0
0
CCK-Yew Tee
#10
Thanks starting to understand...

As for the 'sunny f/22' rule is effective when photographing white subject under very bright condition.

A variation of the 'sunny f/16' rule is the 'sunny f/22' rule. It works in exactly the same way except your base lens aperture setting is f/22. Reducing the level of light reaching by half will darken the highlight areas of the image and add detail.

THANKS:thumbsup:
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
21,903
46
48
Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#11
The Sunny f16 is also call the "Basic Daylight Exposure".

on the Sunny day (subject under sunlight with distinct shadows), you will get a lens aperture of f16, with the shutter speed same or close to your medium ISO, eg, 1/125s with ISO 100, 1/500 with ISO 400...etc.

on the Sunday day but if you are at beach or snow scene, more light will get reflected by the sand, water or snow, so you will get f22 instead.

this rule is very accurate, of course if the photographer can't differentiate between a sunny day and cloudy day, than will not get the correct results.

print out this chart, keep one in your camera bag, it will be handy if your meter fail you.
 

excelglsi

Deregistered
Oct 11, 2005
1,693
0
0
CCK-Yew Tee
#13
The Sunny f16 is also call the "Basic Daylight Exposure".

on the Sunny day (subject under sunlight with distinct shadows), you will get a lens aperture of f16, with the shutter speed same or close to your medium ISO, eg, 1/125s with ISO 100, 1/500 with ISO 400...etc.

on the Sunday day but if you are at beach or snow scene, more light will get reflected by the sand, water or snow, so you will get f22 instead.

this rule is very accurate, of course if the photographer can't differentiate between a sunny day and cloudy day, than will not get the correct results.

print out this chart, keep one in your camera bag, it will be handy if your meter fail you.

Thank alot... Very useful info.. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
 

Camm

New Member
Sep 4, 2002
305
0
0
Visit site
#17
The Sunny f16 is also call the "Basic Daylight Exposure".

on the Sunny day (subject under sunlight with distinct shadows), you will get a lens aperture of f16, with the shutter speed same or close to your medium ISO, eg, 1/125s with ISO 100, 1/500 with ISO 400...etc.

on the Sunday day but if you are at beach or snow scene, more light will get reflected by the sand, water or snow, so you will get f22 instead.

this rule is very accurate, of course if the photographer can't differentiate between a sunny day and cloudy day, than will not get the correct results.

print out this chart, keep one in your camera bag, it will be handy if your meter fail you.

Very informative indeed. Is bright sunlight at 10.30am considered sunny day? I've tried out the sunny f/16 and it turns out too dark
 

KCLow

New Member
Nov 14, 2004
369
0
0
#18
The sunny 16 rule works really well as I have a number of cameras that are fully manual with no built-in light meter. So far I have been getting pretty decent exposure results using it. Of course the latitude of film does mean that even if my exposure is not spot on, I still get quite good details in the shot. One of the websites have created a table that you will do well to print and use as it covers many different lighting situations and the appropriate exposure.
 

miniUltraman

Senior Member
Feb 27, 2006
2,747
0
0
#19
Very bright sunlight.. f16 sky.. not so bright f11 sky.. clowdy f8 :) The shutter speed is 1/iso rule still applies :lovegrin:
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom