Studio - How to set exposure?


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ptyap

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#1
Hi, I am a newbie to studio lightings. I just setup my Jinbei RL330 strobe (will be getting another strobe, the RL660, soon) and since TTL metering is not doing any good in studio photography, I wonder how I should set the exposure? :think:
 

blazer_workz

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#2
Hi, I am a newbie to studio lightings. I just setup my Jinbei RL330 strobe (will be getting another strobe, the RL660, soon) and since TTL metering is not doing any good in studio photography, I wonder how I should set the exposure? :think:
u need a light meter..
 

catchlights

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#4
all studio lights are manual power, you can use a light meter to read the exposure.

another way is to light up your set, get a 18% gray card, place at the subject position, fill your frame with gray card, fire a shot, adjust your flash power or aperture till you get the peak of the histogram right at the center of the graph.
 

blazer_workz

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#5
another way is to light up your set, get a 18% gray card, place at the subject position, fill your frame with gray card, fire a shot, adjust your flash power or aperture till you get the peak of the histogram right at the center of the graph.
:thumbsup: traditional, but useful!
 

ptyap

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#6
another way is to light up your set, get a 18% gray card, place at the subject position, fill your frame with gray card, fire a shot, adjust your flash power or aperture till you get the peak of the histogram right at the center of the graph.
Thanks. Will try it out. ;p
 

Deadpoet

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Oct 18, 2004
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#10
What if I don't have a light meter? Any way around it?
all studio lights are manual power, you can use a light meter to read the exposure.

another way is to light up your set, get a 18% gray card, place at the subject position, fill your frame with gray card, fire a shot, adjust your flash power or aperture till you get the peak of the histogram right at the center of the graph.
GET A LIGHT METER.

You are asking for trouble not having one.

Will you buy a camera and not a lens? Will you buy a PC without HDD? Will you buy a car without wheels?
 

ptyap

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#12
GET A LIGHT METER.

You are asking for trouble not having one.

Will you buy a camera and not a lens? Will you buy a PC without HDD? Will you buy a car without wheels?
Wanted to get one; but I am just wondering whether it is really really necessary. And they are not cheap too; some are more expensive than my strobes. I am rather budget constrained, especially after getting the strobes. :cry:
 

Dec 7, 2006
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west side!
#13
haha i just rmember i did the show and click thing last week in front of some ppl just to smoke them a little...

ya light meter helps, but u can do without them after a while
i normally use the grey card method. works good enough for me.
 

catchlights

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#14
Wanted to get one; but I am just wondering whether it is really really necessary. And they are not cheap too; some are more expensive than my strobes. I am rather budget constrained, especially after getting the strobes. :cry:
it will be quicker for you to learn about studio lights set up.

cos for multiple lights set up, you need to know the ratio of light..
 

Deadpoet

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Oct 18, 2004
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#17
I heard Sekonic is good. Any recommendations on a beginner model? Is it possible to get one for less than $200? :think:
S$200, you can get an off brands. They work.

catchlights, of course, many pros who work with their lights all day all night, they eyes become their light meters. Good for you.

You cannot expect that for everyone. With multiple light set ups, multiple = more than one, get a light meter. With only one, maybe, possibly, you can do without.
 

Deadpoet

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#19
Polaris is fine.

I am using a Minolta Autometer III for years, before I lost it, then bought a IV, and have been using it for years. You can look into getting one 2nd hand, but then, caveat emptor.

Just make sure the meter measure incident light, and better still have the option to trigger the flash/strobes, or ways to measure flash outputs, then you will be in business.
 

blazer_workz

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May 8, 2006
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#20
what traditional? trying to say I'm very old izit?:sticktong have you heard of using string to measure exposure in studio?
heehee..maybe should use conventional..

if the flash with std reflector give you f8 @ 8ft, at 4ft will be f11, at 12ft will be f5.6, just do some marking on a string attach to your flash....
wah!! tis is the first time i heard of such method..but it sounds logical cos aperture, distance guide number are closely related..tis method can call traditional? :bsmilie:
 

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