Stress out..


Aug 16, 2010
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Japan, Tokyo
#1



1. in what area is critique to be sought?
Composition and lighting.

2. what one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
I want viewers to feel how stress out the woman in the picture is.

3. under what circumstance is the picture taken? (physical conditions/emotions)
Was trying out street photography and as i walk pass this empty cafe, only the lady was there. Didn't really think anything of her until i saw her banging her laptop in frustration and after that she just buried her head in her hands as though she was about to cry.

4. what the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture
Personally i feel that i didn't really captured the emotions well but was kind of afraid that she notice me there thus i didn't stay for long. After all who likes to have their picture taken without any permission especially when you are having a bad day?


Just started photography not long ago. Newbie here.
Would appreciate all tips given. :)
 

Feb 13, 2010
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#2
i feel a tigher crop would make the picture look more standout..,just my humble opinion though!,take it with a pinch of salt.
 

enzeru21

New Member
Apr 7, 2010
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upper thomson
#4
it seems more like a photo you took and the woman happened to be inside...

sometimes you can break the rule of thirds... if the idea is the woman.. then let her fill the frame~!
 

flyinbear

New Member
Jun 5, 2010
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#5
i feel a tigher crop would make the picture look more standout..,just my humble opinion though!,take it with a pinch of salt.
second that. mayb b/w photo will bring out the mood too.
 

Aug 16, 2010
1,049
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Japan, Tokyo
#6
Hmm thought that by taking a picture of her with the empty chairs around I might bring out her frustrations better but seems like I'm wrong.

Thanks for the tips guys!
 

pinapple

New Member
Jul 13, 2010
19
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#7
Maybe try spot metering at night with light shine on her would be better?
 

Aug 16, 2010
1,049
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#8
Ahh I don't even know her. Plus I'm just a beginner. All I have is a d5000 with kit lens. No other accessories. :embrass:
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,667
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lil red dot
#9
Hmm thought that by taking a picture of her with the empty chairs around I might bring out her frustrations better but seems like I'm wrong.

Thanks for the tips guys!
The problem is not the other chairs. The problem is that the scene is too busy with too many elements that do not matter, and they all fight for attention with the lady (your point of interest). The awning, the tree with the green leaves, MBS in the background, the lamppost from the right, the pillar on the left, that little part of wooden flooring you captured on the lower left. All these things fight for attention of the viewer.

Isolation is key. So when a viewer look at a picture, the eyes of the viewer is immediately lead/drawn to your point of interest. That will make for a good picture.

Anyways, I did a 5 min job on your pic to show you what is possible. I removed the trees via cloning. And there is no way I can remove the lamppost quickly... And I did a high contrast B&W to create some tension, and push the background a little overexposed so it is less distracting. Let me know when you are done looking at this picture so I can delete it. Hope this helps. Remember, I am just doing this so you can see what I mean. The best thing is still to re-shoot this. Hopefully, when you come across another situation, you can handle the shot better.

 

Last edited:
Aug 16, 2010
1,049
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#10
The problem is not the other chairs. The problem is that the scene is too busy with too many elements that do not matter, and they all fight for attention with the lady (your point of interest). The awning, the tree with the green leaves, MBS in the background, the lamppost from the right, the pillar on the left, that little part of wooden flooring you captured on the lower left. All these things fight for attention of the viewer.

Isolation is key. So when a viewer look at a picture, the eyes of the viewer is immediately lead/drawn to your point of interest. That will make for a good picture.

Anyways, I did a 5 min job on your pic to show you what is possible. I removed the trees via cloning. And there is no way I can remove the lamppost quickly... And I did a high contrast B&W to create some tension, and push the background a little overexposed so it is less distracting. Let me know when you are done looking at this picture so I can delete it. Hope this helps. Remember, I am just doing this so you can see what I mean. The best thing is still to re-shoot this. Hopefully, when you come across another situation, you can handle the shot better.

Saw it already. =)

And thanks! Will keep those tips in mind!
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
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lil red dot
#11
You're welcome. Picture deleted.

You have a good eye to spot good subjects. Just keep on learning and shooting. All the best!
 

Aug 16, 2010
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#12
You're welcome. Picture deleted.

You have a good eye to spot good subjects. Just keep on learning and shooting. All the best!
Hey, thanks for the compliment. You have no idea that means how much to me coming from someone like you. :D

Thanks a lot!!
 

enzeru21

New Member
Apr 7, 2010
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upper thomson
#13
Hey, thanks for the compliment. You have no idea that means how much to me coming from someone like you. :D

Thanks a lot!!
Whee wheet~!

great job sia Daredevil~! :thumbsup:

haha, actually haven got to meet you yet, that day at lower pierce outing you left early..
 

Feb 13, 2010
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#15
Ahh I don't even know her. Plus I'm just a beginner. All I have is a d5000 with kit lens. No other accessories. :embrass:
dont be limit by the equipment you have..nothing matters more than your eye for detail..,and you really have that working up..,you'll reach there in no time with more pratices..,just shoot and enjoy,believe in your camera and kit lens..,they can do wonders you'll never think of!
 

denniskee

Senior Member
Oct 26, 2003
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#17
may i know why u have included the chain (extreme left) and the tree?

it is possible to use frame within frame, ie the white lighting pillar (left) & lamp post (right).

when u were shooting, was it possible to zoom in / shift POV to omit the restaurent's tray stand in the forground? or maybe crop away the stand?
 

Aug 16, 2010
1,049
0
0
24
Japan, Tokyo
#18
dont be limit by the equipment you have..nothing matters more than your eye for detail..,and you really have that working up..,you'll reach there in no time with more pratices..,just shoot and enjoy,believe in your camera and kit lens..,they can do wonders you'll never think of!
Alright! Will practice more! ;)
Thanks for commenting!

Not sure if it is just me. But I think the focus point is not on the woman, but on the chair. So do check your focus point during your shooting. ;)
Hmm i'm pretty sure i did set my focus point on the woman's head. Checked on my ViewNX on where is my focus point and it's still on the woman's head. :confused:
Is my camera faulty or did i made a mistake somewhere?

may i know why u have included the chain (extreme left) and the tree?

it is possible to use frame within frame, ie the white lighting pillar (left) & lamp post (right).

when u were shooting, was it possible to zoom in / shift POV to omit the restaurent's tray stand in the forground? or maybe crop away the stand?
Ahh didn't think about that. =/
Yes it is possible but i didn't do it.
Btw can you tell me more about this frame within frame thing? Never heard it before. Thanks! ;)
 

Jan 12, 2006
335
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Bedok
#19
I think what denniskee meant is to use the white pillar and the gray pillar to frame the woman with her in the centre of the 2 pillars, within a frame (your photograph)

click here for more detailed explanation :)
http://photo.box.sk/tip.php3?id=14
 

Last edited:
Aug 16, 2010
1,049
0
0
24
Japan, Tokyo
#20
I think what denniskee meant is to use the white pillar and the gray pillar to frame the woman with her in the centre of the 2 pillars, within a frame (your photograph)

click here for more detailed explanation :)
http://photo.box.sk/tip.php3?id=14
Thanks for the link! Will try to put it to use the next time i go out again! ;)
 

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