Strange flare problem


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Mar 19, 2006
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#1
These are some of the shots taken at the NDP rehearsal, first time seeing this type of strange flares (green spots in my pictures) appearing in several shots. Anyone had this in their photos before? What is this caused by?




 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
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#2
Looks like ghosting...

you used a filter?
 

Bored Dad

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Jul 24, 2007
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#4
I'm not sure and I might be wrong, it could just be some angle problem that caused the reflection.

Those are the spot lights that were on the floating bridge, they are only turn on during one of the performance. Those spot lights are tilted slighting upwards, thus, it just might due to angle problem and caused the reflections on the shots. Anyway, these can be easily removed through PP works.

Overall, I like the night shots, very nice. :thumbsup:
 

gooseberry

Senior Member
Mar 11, 2004
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#6
It's your UV filter, best to get rid of it or if you feel you have to have one on the front of your lens, use a better quality one with a better quality multi-coating to reduce reflections.
 

LeoDaddy

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Jun 18, 2007
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#7
ehh.. looks like filter no good ar.. wat UV filter u using? :think:
 

sulhan

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May 11, 2002
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#10
Hiee...

thest are re-reflected from internal elements. As high intensity light may result in reflections internally. The CCD surface is highly reflective.
The AR coating can cut some level of light within a certian range - in this case, it reflecs all glowing portion but left some residue. It may or may not caused by the font filter. Try removing and retest.
 

Mar 15, 2005
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#11
I agree with Sulhan. The green lights you see are actually bright points of light reflected from the camera's sensor surface to the len's rear element/glass.

If you look at your first picture, the row of green lights in the night sky are actually reflections of the row of bright lights between the building and the sea. It's green because the sensor recorded the colour of your lens multi-coating....green!

I am not sure what lens you are using but if you use the newer lenses in the market that's marketed as "digital" lenses they have extra multi-coating on the rear lens element to eliminate or reduce flare caused by the CCD/CMOS sensor.
 

Mar 19, 2006
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North East
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#12
Thanks to all for the replies. Also realised the green spots are a mirror reflections from the lights in the pictures.

My set up is a Canon kit lens 18-55mm, using a Hoya "UV-Guard" Filter. The packaging never say anything about coating so don't think it comes with any. Will a filter with coating prevent the reflection from the glass elements?

Does the initials on filters like MRC(B+W) or HMC (Hoya) means they come with coating?
 

ExplorerZ

Senior Member
Jan 9, 2006
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#13
Thanks to all for the replies. Also realised the green spots are a mirror reflections from the lights in the pictures.

My set up is a Canon kit lens 18-55mm, using a Hoya "UV-Guard" Filter. The packaging never say anything about coating so don't think it comes with any. Will a filter with coating prevent the reflection from the glass elements?

Does the initials on filters like MRC(B+W) or HMC (Hoya) means they come with coating?
They do not prevent... just have a lesser chance than having a non-coated filter, but the chances are still higher than without any filter at all.

yes MRC and HMC are a type of coating.
 

gooseberry

Senior Member
Mar 11, 2004
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#14
I agree with Sulhan. The green lights you see are actually bright points of light reflected from the camera's sensor surface to the len's rear element/glass.

If you look at your first picture, the row of green lights in the night sky are actually reflections of the row of bright lights between the building and the sea. It's green because the sensor recorded the colour of your lens multi-coating....green!

I am not sure what lens you are using but if you use the newer lenses in the market that's marketed as "digital" lenses they have extra multi-coating on the rear lens element to eliminate or reduce flare caused by the CCD/CMOS sensor.
Yes, it is reflection off the sensor, but the thing that is reflecting it back again is definitely the filter and not the internal elements of the lens. If you notice the reflection is exactly diametrically opposite the original source relative to the centre of the image - this is due to reflecting off the sensor and then reflecting back again from a flat piece of low quality glass - the cheap filter in front. If the filter is removed, you definitely won't get this type of reflection in your images.
 

mysum

New Member
Apr 18, 2006
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#15
Looks like reflections. Flare would hit the image at an angle, I believe.
 

LeoDaddy

New Member
Jun 18, 2007
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Singapore
#16
Thanks to all for the replies. Also realised the green spots are a mirror reflections from the lights in the pictures.

My set up is a Canon kit lens 18-55mm, using a Hoya "UV-Guard" Filter. The packaging never say anything about coating so don't think it comes with any. Will a filter with coating prevent the reflection from the glass elements?

Does the initials on filters like MRC(B+W) or HMC (Hoya) means they come with coating?
Hey guys.. confirm filter problem.. I use Hoya UV guard also.. and ealier this evening I was trying to shoot the moon.. this is wat i've got.



Remove filter.. extra green moon gone! Put back.. its there again!!

Same green spot problem as TS!! Can I say Hoya UV Guard filter suxx?? :sticktong

 

Mar 19, 2006
241
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North East
www.flickr.com
#17
Looks like the mystery is solved :) . It is due to my Hoya "UV guard" filter, maybe it can only be used under the sun's UV rays but not moonlight, spotlights etc:bsmilie:

Have to invest in better UV filter if I get a better lens in the future
 

blazer_workz

Senior Member
May 8, 2006
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ClubSNAP Community
#19
Is it only the Hoya ones that have this problem or generally UV filters can only be used when there's sunlight?
So far from my experience of using Hoya, Tokina, B+W and Nikon filters..it seems this kind of flaring occurs frequently with the Hoya and Tokina ones..but on some situations the B+W and Nikon ones do show some flaring too.
 

Galdor

Senior Member
Jul 5, 2006
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#20
So far from my experience of using Hoya, Tokina, B+W and Nikon filters..it seems this kind of flaring occurs frequently with the Hoya and Tokina ones..but on some situations the B+W and Nikon ones do show some flaring too.
Thanks for the info bro. So it seems like all UV filters will have this problem and the Hoya & Tokina ones are more likely to experience it.
 

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