sRGB or AdobeRGB and WB issues


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Dec 7, 2006
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Smokey Mountain
#1
Guys,

noobie here.. just want to ask what mode are you using for the color space? and does these color spaces got to do with WB setting to achieved you desired effect.. if so what WB you use? shade, flash, manual ect...?

hope you can eblighten me..
 

ExplorerZ

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Jan 9, 2006
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#2
Guys,

noobie here.. just want to ask what mode are you using for the color space? and does these color spaces got to do with WB setting to achieved you desired effect.. if so what WB you use? shade, flash, manual ect...?

hope you can eblighten me..
don think colorspace affects the WB, color are slightly different tho(sRGB normally more vibrance)
95% auto for me...
 

Liew

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Apr 12, 2006
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#3
if you're good in colours, use AdobeRGB if not, stick with sRGB. most printers doesn't recognise AdobeRGB so you have to be careful when you send it over to them, otherwise, the colours will look like it's grey-tinted.

however, if you do conversion, from AdobeRGB to sRGB, the colour tends to warm a little.

go and do some read up, colour space I, II, III for nikon system has their own function from time to time.

and white balance has got nothing do with the colour management i think. i change my white balance depending on what i'm shooting from time to time.
 

soonwah

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Nov 16, 2005
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#6
I suggest that you use sRGB for everything first until you are very familiar with colorspaces. sRGB is the standard colorspace used in Windows and is also the default for most inkjet printers. It is also the default colorspace in the JPEG files from all compact digital cameras. Hence, working with sRGB will let you see the changes you made in digital post processing appear correctly on inkjet printers, using OEM ink and papers as well as appearing on webpages. I think most processing lab that print photos will also use sRGB as most of the photos they received are from compact digital cameras. Using sRGB will let you see the result of your post-processing effort and will likely encourage you to find out more about using other colorspaces to improve the colors of your pictures.
aRGB is a colorspace that has a wider color gamut than sRGB but the processing that you made based on what you see on the screen may not be reproduced correctly in the final output for print or the web. It has its benefit in preserving the colors in your photos captured with a DSLR camera, provided that not too much post processing is done. If you start with a sRGB image, I do not think that it will be very useful.
 

bigbun

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Feb 9, 2006
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#9
i especially like this quote from Ken Rockwell..

Adobe RGB should never be used unless you really know what you're doing and do all your printing yourself. If you really know what you're doing and working in publishing, go right ahead and use it. If you have to ask, don't even try it.

saves me from reading the rest of the article. ;p
 

Dec 7, 2006
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Smokey Mountain
#10
i especially like this quote from Ken Rockwell..

Adobe RGB should never be used unless you really know what you're doing and do all your printing yourself. If you really know what you're doing and working in publishing, go right ahead and use it. If you have to ask, don't even try it.

saves me from reading the rest of the article. ;p
THANKS GUYS...
 

David

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#11
This is a confusing topic which I have to conclude not many people understand 100%! I don't too. I've heard all sorts of versions from books and the Webs. Unfortunately, those who are experts in it explain it in such technical and complicated manner i't's not easy to understand. I think there is such a thing as Ph.D on color science!

Kind of given up. Just know that sRGB for webs. Printing from inkjets is controversial. Some say sRGB, some say Adobe RGB. Yes, experts, not amateurs. I really dun care about such things. As long as the colors come out well for me, will do.

But in Photoshop, the colors are fantastic when you choose Adobe RGB. I hate to convert to sRGB. The colors are so much duller and warmer.
 

Jan 12, 2005
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#12
But in Photoshop, the colors are fantastic when you choose Adobe RGB. I hate to convert to sRGB. The colors are so much duller and warmer.
That's cuz Photoshop is colour space aware. When you print out or see the pic in IE in aRGB you are gonna be disappointed.
 

David

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#14
well, if you don mind the trouble, i think saving and keeping in aRGB is better. then convert them to sRGB when you sent in for printing or web.
But provided whatever viewer you used to view your images are Adobe RGB friendly rite? I've tried some viewing softwares and they can't "take" Adobe RGB.

It's so ironic. You shoot in Adobe RGB cos yr cam is capable of it. You adjust in Adobe RGB cos it gives you a wider gamut than sRGB and the colors are lovely. But when you showcase the images for others to see, you have to throw colors away by using sRGB!

The Win XP browser sux. It ruins all my Adobe RGB. Read from a similar discussion in CS that Win XP will not display Adobe RGB?
 

gooseberry

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Mar 11, 2004
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#16
This statement of his is just plain funny...

Adobe RGB should never be used unless you really know what you're doing

To use anything, you'd have to know what you are doing.

He also makes a number of wrong statements in that article.
 

Ansel

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Apr 30, 2003
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#18
This issue took me a while to understand too. sRGB is convenient because it is the final format for most of my applications (lab prints and web). AdobeRGB is a bigger space and it allows you to realize the full potential of your image if you want to print top quality Inkjet prints.

If you shoot RAW, then you don't really have to decide until conversion time on the PC, as the RAW format is space independant, or rather, it has it's own proprietary "colourspace" which is wide enough to be converted to any space.

ColourSpace is a concern only if you want to shoot in JPG and you dont want to have to convert in JPG. A fellow clubsnapper gave me a very convenient rule of thumb which he also uses -- When shooting in JPG, set to sRGB. In RAW, it doesn't matter what you set because it can be defaulted to any space you want in the RAW converter software software. So in short, in my camera it is set to sRGB as a default.

Auto WB was not that accurate in D70, but when I switched to D200, the Auto WB is accurate 95% of the time.
 

David

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#19
This statement of his is just plain funny...

Adobe RGB should never be used unless you really know what you're doing

To use anything, you'd have to know what you are doing.

He also makes a number of wrong statements in that article.

Yeah... Ah, finally someone has pointed it out! i was about to say even Ken Rockwell ain't know much about colors. For these people (and surprisingly from a supposed pro), they just pretend, Oh forget about other things, just concentrate what I know. And the worse part, this wrong thinking gets passed on. (Look at bigbun's comments and you know how fast wrong ideas catch on!)
 

bigbun

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Feb 9, 2006
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#20
This statement of his is just plain funny...

Adobe RGB should never be used unless you really know what you're doing

To use anything, you'd have to know what you are doing.

He also makes a number of wrong statements in that article.
he's not exactly wrong, he just has very different opinions when compared to most photographers.
afterall, he's a pro-JPG professional photographer.
 

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