sRGB or Adobe RGB


Jun 22, 2012
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#1
Read up the difference between these 2 is that, adobe RGB have a bigger spectrum of colour range. But for printing sRGB is suitable.

A question here, I do not really use photoshop to further enhance my photos, only rarely like converting to BW, or tint to blue colours and some basic effects. Sometimes might print a few photos if I like them around 0.1% of photos taken.

The file size for sRGB is bigger... now is it better to use sRGB or adobe RGB? Am I losing details/quality if I use one instead of another? Hope any guru or someone with knowledge on this area be able to help!

Thanks
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#3
do you shoot in RAW? yes? no?
do you post process your images a lot? yes? no?
is your monitor calibrated? yes? no?


anyway..

if you showcase your image on monitor mainly, use sRGB

if you make prints from labs, use sRGB,

if you work on press, use AdobeRGB and output is CMYK
 

Achim Reh

New Member
Nov 1, 2011
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#4
I don't know what and where you read about this , but sRGB is not really suitable for Printing. sRGB has a smaller color spectrum, thats correct. sRGBwas specifically designed for computer screens , to match an RGB Color Spectrum . Adobe RGB 1998 was created specially for printing , to match a CMYK Color space. So, if you want to print your pictures, you better switch to Adobe RGB
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#5
I don't know what and where you read about this , but sRGB is not really suitable for Printing. sRGB has a smaller color spectrum, thats correct. sRGBwas specifically designed for computer screens , to match an RGB Color Spectrum . Adobe RGB 1998 was created specially for printing , to match a CMYK Color space. So, if you want to print your pictures, you better switch to Adobe RGB
yes, for press, AdobeRGB.



for making prints from labs (Kodak or Fuji digital labs, etc), you need to have your images in sRGB color space, their machine only accept sRGB.
 

user12343

Senior Member
May 15, 2005
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#6
some swear by ProPhoto color space for their widest gamut.
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#7
some swear by ProPhoto color space for their widest gamut.
Let's put it this way: many people go for the option of maybe possibly using certain feature in the future ... but forgetting what they actually need today.
 

Blur Shadow

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Sep 17, 2005
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#8
I am usually on sRGB. I haven't done projects that require Adobe RGB. I think most casual photographers are probably best on sRGB.
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#9
Read up the difference between these 2 is that, adobe RGB have a bigger spectrum of colour range. But for printing sRGB is suitable.

A question here, I do not really use photoshop to further enhance my photos, only rarely like converting to BW, or tint to blue colours and some basic effects. Sometimes might print a few photos if I like them around 0.1% of photos taken.

The file size for sRGB is bigger... now is it better to use sRGB or adobe RGB? Am I losing details/quality if I use one instead of another? Hope any guru or someone with knowledge on this area be able to help!

Thanks
do you shoot in RAW? if yes, setting color space in camera is irrelevant, RAW file don't embed color space, if you process your RAW file in lightroom, the images are develop in ProPhoto, and only when you export the images in tiff or jpg format, than you need to decide which color space to use.

since you don't use photoshop to enhance the photos, and only print a couple of photos, do you think you really need to use AdobeRGB or ProPhoto color space for all your photos? and convert to sRGB when you want to send for printing?

monitor and lab prints use sRGB color space, if you camera set at sRGB, you don't do massive editing on the images, what is there any details and quality you have lost?

and where do you come arcoss the files with sRGB color space are bigger file size? any reference?




anyway, some of my stock photos are processed and touch up in 8bit tiff file with sRGB color space, export as sRGB jpg and upload to stock agency,
designers downloaded the photos, manipulate the jpg file further, and I see some of the photos are printed in large banners, posters, even on double decker bus.

so don't be too concern on any details and quality loss of using different color space. you won't notice any different at all.
 

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