Sport photography .


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Jan 16, 2010
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#1
In weeks to come , I will be up for covering a handball match . I was thinking what other gear do i need besides the ones i have below . Adding on , what are some rules i have to remember ?
 

Reportage

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Nov 24, 2008
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#2
depends on the venue....any place with lighting similar to suntec city halls are more or less GG even with f2.8 lens.

rules depends on the organiser simply said.

what to bring...generally for Canon would be 100-400 + 70-200 + 16-35 so would be the Nikon equivalents but depending where you are shooting from and if really bright day, a single 50-500 might be sufficient.
 

Jan 16, 2010
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#3
depends on the venue....any place with lighting similar to suntec city halls are more or less GG even with f2.8 lens.

rules depends on the organiser simply said.

what to bring...generally for Canon would be 100-400 + 70-200 + 16-35 so would be the Nikon equivalents but depending where you are shooting from and if really bright day, a single 50-500 might be sufficient.
It would be at the normal school parade square which is normally surrounded by walls . Apart from that , it's pure sunlight . I should be going with 18-200mm and a 50mm . Maybe with a grip or something . Is that sufficient ?
 

lamergod

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#4
Use a 18-200 and use it as a 'remote' behind the goal. You'll get some real cool shots if they shoot the way I see the professional shoots by jumping. A rough idea of what I mean is something like this. I have a behind goal shot that used to be in my flickr but I deleted it. This is pretty close except I'd suggest you work at the bottom left/right or waist length at the centre

The best remote photograph I've seen are created by Sydney Low

Use your 18-200 too to get some action shots. Always stay put at one place. Handball is a fast paced game no point running around. I once saw a few guys shooting football and running up and down the goal line =.=
 

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Prismatic

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#5
One important thing that you have to do for any sports photography is to do your research first. Read up on the rules and regulation of the game, then if possible check for any videos of the game available on the internet.

This way, you will have a better idea of what to expect during the match, so you can better position yourself and compose your shot.

For example, in handball, once a player steps into the goal perimeter, he/she must take the most direct path to the goal. So in this case, you should be getting ready for his shot at goal once he cross the goal perimeter line.

Despite being in bright daylight, you will be able to shoot at fast shutter speeds, but something to think about is that sometimes you may have to stop down a bit, to obtain a suitable depth of field too.
 

Jan 16, 2010
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#6
Use a 18-200 and use it as a 'remote' behind the goal. You'll get some real cool shots if they shoot the way I see the professional shoots by jumping. A rough idea of what I mean is something like this. I have a behind goal shot that used to be in my flickr but I deleted it. This is pretty close except I'd suggest you work at the bottom left/right or waist length at the centre

The best remote photograph I've seen are created by Sydney Low

Use your 18-200 too to get some action shots. Always stay put at one place. Handball is a fast paced game no point running around. I once saw a few guys shooting football and running up and down the goal line =.=
Thanks for your suggestion . I now can imagine different perspective of the game . Especially the behind goal position . Apart from these , do I have to rent any extra gear ?
 

Jan 16, 2010
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#7
One important thing that you have to do for any sports photography is to do your research first. Read up on the rules and regulation of the game, then if possible check for any videos of the game available on the internet.

This way, you will have a better idea of what to expect during the match, so you can better position yourself and compose your shot.

For example, in handball, once a player steps into the goal perimeter, he/she must take the most direct path to the goal. So in this case, you should be getting ready for his shot at goal once he cross the goal perimeter line.

Despite being in bright daylight, you will be able to shoot at fast shutter speeds, but something to think about is that sometimes you may have to stop down a bit, to obtain a suitable depth of field too.
I am a handball player too , haha . I just probably need some positional tips and exposure tips like you have mentioned earlier about the DOF . Thanks alot .
 

Reportage

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Nov 24, 2008
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#8
can leave the 50mm at home unless you want to take players portraits.

in my experience...you will be using the 100~200mm most of the time depending on your vantage point and then for group photo, the default kit 18mm will be enough if in broad daylight.
 

Jan 16, 2010
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#9
Much thanks . So I can say that with my current d90 and 18-200mm , it will do enough magic to cover for the match ?
 

Reportage

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Nov 24, 2008
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#10
as long there is enough light....that is the condition. If you want to be safe can rent a 70-200 2.8 which can give f2.8 that might help if the lighting is not on your side.
 

Jan 16, 2010
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#11
Okay , that clears my doubt . Thanks a lotttt . Problem solved , thread closed . Special thanks to Reportage .
 

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