Sorry, one newbie question


lemonaid

New Member
Feb 11, 2011
35
0
0
#1
When you guys are taking landscape or potraits, do u normally use the landscape and portraits mode in the mode dial. or stick to manual mode?

sorry if this question is a bit noob.
 

spree86

Senior Member
Feb 3, 2009
4,774
0
0
Bishan
www.flickr.com
#2
When you guys are taking landscape or potraits, do u normally use the landscape and portraits mode in the mode dial. or stick to manual mode?

sorry if this question is a bit noob.
If you are talking about DSLRs, we usually do not use portrait or landscape mode for anything at all. If you are unsure about using manual, how about starting with aperture priority mode first?
 

giantcanopy

Senior Member
Feb 11, 2007
6,232
2
0
SG
#3
Program modes are not entirely useless. The program modes serve as guides for a start that determines exposure, changing particular parameters to fit the needed mode. for landscape mode necessitating a deeper dof the aperture is smaller for instance.

While automatic scene modes are advantegenous in a pns, there is more control in manual settings in a dslr.

I shoot mainly landscapes, and i mostly adjust the settings manually.

Ryan
 

giantcanopy

Senior Member
Feb 11, 2007
6,232
2
0
SG
#4
Program modes are not entirely useless. The program modes serve as guides for a start that determines exposure, changing particular parameters to fit the needed mode. for landscape mode necessitating a deeper dof the aperture is smaller for instance.

While automatic scene modes are advantegenous in a pns, there is more control in manual settings in a dslr.

I shoot mainly landscapes, and i mostly adjust the settings manually.

Ryan
 

Diavonex

Senior Member
Sep 23, 2008
3,641
0
0
Admiralty
#5
If you understand the relationship between Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO, you can use any mode (A,P,S or M).
 

lemonaid

New Member
Feb 11, 2011
35
0
0
#6
If you understand the relationship between Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO, you can use any mode (A,P,S or M).
I understand what each of them does individually. But what exactly is the relationship between them?

Also, to all. I'm more interested in shooting buildings, landscapes sceneries. Most of the time the building or scenery is too big to be focused entirely. Is it better to use the wide focus, instead of spot or local in shooting such "grander" things?
 

ricohflex

Senior Member
Feb 24, 2005
3,353
8
38
sing
#7
Aperture priority Program Shutter speed priority modes are simple manifestations of what you would probably set Manually to get certain desired effects. Once you understand exposure - shutter speed - aperture relationship there's nothing to it.

Just a bit of marketing hype. They learned that people love to turn dials and fix settings. Applied psychology. Hence the various "modes".

Sometimes they get carried away. In the past, some camera models have been sold with:
High Speed program mode
Normal Program mode
Slow Speed Program mode
 

Last edited:

kei1309

Senior Member
Apr 12, 2010
7,312
23
0
Earth
www.facebook.com
#8
i've always used Aperture Priority or Manual. i do all the settings myself... those are just "good-to-have" modes when you've got no time to change the settings, or too lazy to.
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,491
26
48
Pasir Ris
#9
I understand what each of them does individually. But what exactly is the relationship between them?
Erm.. they all affect the recording of light.
To start with: when you close the aperture let's say from f/5.6 to f/11 then less light will enter camera and hit the sensor. If you don't want to have a darker image then a) use a slower shutter speed; or b) increase ISO speed (sensor sensitivity) to counter this. Read the newbies guides again.
Secondly: use the Landscape mode, half-press the shutter and see which settings are selected. Then start changing aperture (see manual) and watch the other parameters.

Also, to all. I'm more interested in shooting buildings, landscapes sceneries. Most of the time the building or scenery is too big to be focused entirely. Is it better to use the wide focus, instead of spot or local in shooting such "grander" things?
Doesn't matter much as long as your aperture is set to a value that gives enough Depth of Field. More to read here: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/depth-of-field.htm
In addition, you may also want to read about hyperfocal distance (it's linked on this website, too) and manually setting your lens to it.
Keep in mind: a camera des not 'see' any building, landscape, tree or person. All what the camera can 'see' are colours, patterns, brightness. So you need to verify what the camera is doing and whether this is correct. Especially when using multiple AF points.
 

edutilos-

Senior Member
Dec 28, 2010
6,032
17
38
The Universe
www.facebook.com
#10
It is up to you how to use your camera. But the fact remains that you will have greater control over the image if you use the more manual modes (AV/TV/Manual).
 

Daoyin

Senior Member
Nov 25, 2008
2,808
6
38
West
#11
I understand what each of them does individually. But what exactly is the relationship between them?

Also, to all. I'm more interested in shooting buildings, landscapes sceneries. Most of the time the building or scenery is too big to be focused entirely. Is it better to use the wide focus, instead of spot or local in shooting such "grander" things?
Besides the aperture, shutter speed and iso thingy, the choice of focus point(s) plus the focal length, you also have to consider the type of metering. Good luck.
 

skylover

New Member
Oct 26, 2008
1,112
0
0
Singapore
www.sky.kaos-theory.net
#12
To start off. Start understanding each of the dial function on your camera. Understand some of the theory and at the same time try out to see the difference. Its going to take you sometime to understand. Feel free to ask question if you still have doubt about things. We are all here to share. ^^

Just in case you need some reading materials. Click on those links provided below. It should help you kick start and clear some of your doubts.

Camera basics - Commonly Asked Qns Like what is ISO, Shutter Speed, Aperture etc
http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=309544

Video Clips posted by ed9119

Composition
http://www.amateursnapper.com/photog...position-rules
http://digital-photography-school.co...mposition-tips
http://www.digital-photography-school.com/10-more-quick-composition-tips-illustrated

Landscape Photography
http://www.digital-photography-school.com/11-surefire-tips-for-improving-your-landscape-photography

Street Photography
http://www.digital-photography-school.com/10-tips-for-the-aspiring-street-photographer

More topics covered here:
http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials.htm
http://www.digital-photography-school.com/learning-exposure-in-digital-photography
Understanding Stops and Exposure
Hyperfocal Distance Table Generator
Landscape & Hyperfocus
 

Top Bottom