Sky Blue ??


#1
Hi all,



Uploaded with ImageShack.us
Film Mode: Dynamic (color)
Exposure Program: Aperture-priority AE
Exposure: 0.001 sec (1/2000)
Aperture: f/2.2
Focal Length: 5.1 mm
ISO Speed: 80

Me newbie here too! :D
A quick puzzling question - what kind of setting is consider normal for taking sky picture OR pictures with blue sky & white clouds included?

I try to upload photos tonight as i forgot to bring my sd card to work. :mad2:

Currently, those sky that i see VERY BLUE is giving me this type of BLUE/CYAN in my photos ... looks very very light and fake!

I using aperture mode with mostly F2.8 or F2.0 if i can go lower. (LX3 user).

Please advise. thank you.
 

Last edited:

Stoppable

Senior Member
Apr 28, 2003
545
0
16
Serangoon
#2
Seems that it could be too bright or you may need a UV filter. But f2.8 seems too bright. Try a bigger f number.
 

Aug 3, 2008
1,127
0
0
Hougang
www.geekbrains.com
#3
Hi, welcome to CS! Was it too sunny or cloudy?

Did you set your White Balance right?
In addition to the auto white balance mode the LX3 offers five presets (daylight, cloudy, shade, flash, and tungsten)
In addition to the auto white balance mode the LX3 offers five presets (daylight, cloudy, shade, flash, and tungsten)

Is it appearing correctly in your camera's LCD but not on your PC screen? Did you calibrate your monitor?

What mode did you take this picture? (iA, P, S, A, M, Custom?) Did you set your ISO manually?
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
0
0
rainy Singapore
#4
Hi all,

Me newbie here too! :D
A quick puzzling question - what kind of setting is consider normal for taking sky picture OR pictures with blue sky & white clouds included?

I try to upload photos tonight as i forgot to bring my sd card to work. :mad2:

Currently, those sky that i see VERY BLUE is giving me this type of BLUE/CYAN in my photos ... looks very very light and fake!

I using aperture mode with mostly F2.8 or F2.0 if i can go lower. (LX3 user).

Please advise. thank you.
if the sky is a deep blue but you're getting very light blue instead, I guess it's highly likely that the photo is overexposed. If you happen to be in that situation again, try with negative EV (eg. -2/3 EV) and see if that improves things.
 

Blur Shadow

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2005
4,886
4
0
#5
A picture with full EXIF info may be useful.

But for a quick answer, do check that your picture is correctly exposed with the correct WB.
 

Diavonex

Senior Member
Sep 23, 2008
3,641
0
0
Admiralty
#6
Pick a bright sunny day with nice blue sky; the direction of the light is also very important.

The picture below is also taken with a LX3; no filter, no PP.

Exposure: 1/800 sec

Aperture: F4

Mode: Program mode

ISO: 80

Firmware: 2.21

Metering: Centre weighted

 

Diavonex

Senior Member
Sep 23, 2008
3,641
0
0
Admiralty
#7
Make sure you updated your firmware to V2.21; white balance will improve significantly.
 

Diavonex

Senior Member
Sep 23, 2008
3,641
0
0
Admiralty
#13
Maximum polarization is achieved when the sun is coming from your left or right (i.e. you shoot at right angle to the light).

A polarizing filter is useless if the sun is behind you.

Your shadow will give you an indication where the light is coming from.
 

#15
Yes ... enjoying every single bit of it! its a stress reliever for me i think but then again when expectation gets high ... or i should say every time the outcome on the LCD of camera and my laptop is different so there is still sense of disappointment so wanna get better the next time and the next time. ^^

Thank you all ... especially Diavonex, i will try out again. :)

Oppps the filters are additional lens ah? ... i thought SW.
 

Aug 10, 2004
289
0
16
Canada, Singapore
#16
Maximum polarization is achieved when the sun is coming from your left or right (i.e. you shoot at right angle to the light).

A polarizing filter is useless if the sun is behind you.

Your shadow will give you an indication where the light is coming from.
Hi

I am a newbie and wished you could help in the use of polarisers..

U mentioned that "A polarizing filter is useless if the sun is behing you"..

What do you mean by that and also since it is useless if the sun is behind me, how about beach scenes and pics with water elements as main subject..How would you go about for such subjects..?

Thanking you..
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
0
0
rainy Singapore
#17
Hi

I am a newbie and wished you could help in the use of polarisers..

U mentioned that "A polarizing filter is useless if the sun is behing you"..

What do you mean by that and also since it is useless if the sun is behind me, how about beach scenes and pics with water elements as main subject..How would you go about for such subjects..?

Thanking you..

You should read THIS to gain some insight into polarising filters.
The effectiveness of the polarising filter is determined partly by the angle from which the light is coming. Maximum polarisation is possible when the source of polarised light (in this case the sun) is at 90 degrees to the direction you are photographing. So if you are standing at the edge of a lake and looking out at the water, it would be easiest to cut away the reflections on the water surface when the sun is to your left, or to your right.
If the sun is in front, or behind, or directly above, the polariser has minimal effect. Try it yourself to prove the theory right or wrong.
 

chanjyj

New Member
Apr 8, 2007
1,909
0
0
#18
You can try and use a polarising filter or GND filter to darken the sky. On a sunny day with nice blue sky, you can do it without a filter (see picture below).
DO NOT use a CPL if you are using a UWA lens as polarization of the sky varies from one end of the sky to the other. Polarization of the sky is maximum at 90 degrees from the sun, and none at the sun and 180 degrees from it. W/ a super wide you are sweeping such a broad expanse that the polarizing effect will vary greatly across the sky. You may get a dark area in the sky.
 

Aug 10, 2004
289
0
16
Canada, Singapore
#19
You should read THIS to gain some insight into polarising filters.
The effectiveness of the polarising filter is determined partly by the angle from which the light is coming. Maximum polarisation is possible when the source of polarised light (in this case the sun) is at 90 degrees to the direction you are photographing. So if you are standing at the edge of a lake and looking out at the water, it would be easiest to cut away the reflections on the water surface when the sun is to your left, or to your right.
If the sun is in front, or behind, or directly above, the polariser has minimal effect. Try it yourself to prove the theory right or wrong.
Oh I see..

So I keep my polarisers lah..Dun throw them away right..? Still useful even though minimal (not useless) when I am at 180 deg shooting position from the sun's reference point..:)
 

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