Size of Drycabinet??


benfires

New Member
Dec 3, 2014
28
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Singapore
#1
Hi all,

Recently been digging around forums and all, and finally decided to seriously consider a drycabi instead of multiple dryboxes to hold my gear.
Problem is I dunno what size to get! Haha!
Hope anyone can help with recommendation? Here's what I intend to store, all Nikon gear or mounts;

D7100 gripped
D70s
F90x
Kiev-19 film SLR
Nikkor 70-300 4.5-5.6
Sigma 18-35 1.8
Nikkor 50 1.8
Nikkor 35 2
Jupiter-37A 135 3.5

If can fit exact at nice fit is good, because I highly doubt I'll get more gear without selling off some of what I have now.
Thanks!

Edit; probably worth mentioning that I have 2 speedlights (SB-600 and YN 568 EX) plus TTL cable and 4x YN-603N II transceivers. Do I need to store those in drycabi also?
 

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kandinsky

Moderator
Staff member
Apr 26, 2008
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#2
I think a 60L might work for you. You can always lug your gear down to a shop that displays all the sizes to try.
 

Dec 18, 2010
44
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6
Singapore
#3
Hi, good decision to move to a drycabi. The purpose of using a drycabi/box is that it helps to keep out moisturer. And moisture is bad for the optics. If there is no optics in the equipment, then putting it in the drycabi/box will only occupy precious space. There is no optics in the speedlights and cable, why should they be in the drycabi/box then.

Rather than asking how big a unit you need, probably you should know if you have the space to place the cabi. A cabi is different from a box.
 

benfires

New Member
Dec 3, 2014
28
0
0
Singapore
#5
Wish I had a car haha... All that gear is really heavy! I'll look into the 60L model, that should let me store everything with ample spacing right?
 

benfires

New Member
Dec 3, 2014
28
0
0
Singapore
#6
I can definitely clear space for a cabi, not an issue for me!

Good point about the ttl cable and speedlights I suppose. I was worried about rusting or oxidising of the metal contacts I guess haha...
 

kandinsky

Moderator
Staff member
Apr 26, 2008
3,014
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#7
Wish I had a car haha... All that gear is really heavy! I'll look into the 60L model, that should let me store everything with ample spacing right?
Another option is to note the dimensions of the shelf you are look at. Arrange your equipment out on a flat surface, and roughly compare the 'footprint' it takes up compared to the number of shelves. Should give you a rough idea lah.

Made a simple graphic based on the internal dimensions of my 60l (digi cabi) to give you an idea of what I mean.
Shelves are usually height adjustable.

 

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benfires

New Member
Dec 3, 2014
28
0
0
Singapore
#8
Thanks, never thought about this. Time to take out measuring tape lo....
 

Aug 25, 2014
269
1
18
SG
#9
60L should be enough, but the first drawer the curve is not able to house my lens properly as my only are between 77-82 they all knocking on each other
 

Aug 17, 2005
407
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16
Northern Singapore
#10
I thought placing the lenses upright standing save space than having them lying down. Just my thought.
 

SkyStrike

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Staff member
Nov 29, 2010
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#11
I thought placing the lenses upright standing save space than having them lying down. Just my thought.
But it might be more troublesome trying to take them out? Esp if the tray can't pull out.
 

Aug 17, 2005
407
0
16
Northern Singapore
#12
I see. I have not been looking at a dry cabinet for a long time. Mine is without any drawer. So the recent ones do have a drawer? May i know which brand/model so that i can consider when mine breakdown.
Thanks!
 

SkyStrike

Moderator
Staff member
Nov 29, 2010
3,444
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Somewhere
#13
Not too sure about the various brands/models. I'm only quite sure the Digi Cabni 036 doesn't have a drawer...
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com

thoongeng

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2010
1,279
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#17
Akarui dry cabinets generally have shelves that can be pulled out
 

donut88

Senior Member
Nov 14, 2008
2,182
5
0
#19
Thanks for the info.
Like a house, always get bigger one because u will eventually find a smaller one too small and u want to upgrade.

Cost difference between sizes is not much. So save your future headache, get a bigger one now
 

coolthought

Senior Member
Jun 23, 2008
2,310
1
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#20
Layout everything on a piece of large paper. Draw a rectangle encircling everything. Measure the length and depth and the height of the tallest item. Add additional maybe at least 2cm to the dimensions. Then multiply all 3 numbers. You got volume in cm3. Then convert 1000cm3 = 1 litre. Whatever decimal point you have, just round up to nearest whole number and look for a cabinet with the nearest higher volume. Edited. Before buying, check if combined shelving area is more than area of your layout rectangle. Always add more area.
With this, you have a good idea of the size but this guide is not definite as you may not be able to layout the same way as you did with the actual cabinet. Hence, always have a little more.
 

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