Simple way to clean ur optics


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MrJelly

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Oct 28, 2008
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#1
Just a short tutorial how to clean ur optics.

U just need three cheap items to clean ur optics perfectly.

i) Cotton Tips (can buy in any supermarket)
ii) Lens cleaning tissues (can buy in camera shop)
iii) Acetone (can buy in pharmacy shops like Guardian) (If can find 99% acetone, will be the best)


That's all items we need.



Procedures

- For cleaning front UV filter (if any), just put acetone solution onto lens tissue and then wipe in circular direction from centre outwards. UV filter is very robust glass. So just wipe it with no worry.

- For cleaning front or rear element of lens, dont just anyhow wipe with force as u may make scratch. Wipe slowly in circular direction from centre outwards if u need to clean whole surface. Or if just want to clean specific spot on lens, use cotton tip and wrap lens tissue around the tip (change the tip location of tissue intervally after a few wipe). Use a bit acetone and wipe in circular direction.

Once done, u will get back ur mint sweet optic as new. ;)

Warning: Acetone can react with plastic and rubber thingy. So be careful not to touch acetone solution to any other part than optics that u intend to clean.

Hope my tutorial may be useful to u all. :cool:
 

insanekvn

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Aug 1, 2008
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#2
how about the coating of our UV filter? will it be affected by the acetone? sorry for my newbie question hehehe
 

creampuff

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Jul 11, 2006
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#3
MrJelly, I would suggest you seriously reconsider an alternative to acetone.
Acetone is a big no-no as it is highly flammable and while it works as a cleaning agent, it is also quite reactive and dissolves a lot of plastics and attacks paint. Also the vapour is not good if inhaled.

Better to use isopropyl alcohol. ;)
 

MrJelly

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Oct 28, 2008
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#4
MrJelly, I would suggest you seriously reconsider an alternative to acetone.
Acetone is a big no-no as it is highly flammable and while it works as a cleaning agent, it is also quite reactive and dissolves a lot of plastics and attacks paint. Also the vapour is not good if inhaled.

Better to use isopropyl alcohol. ;)
bro, keeping small bottle of acetone like that is not dangerous at all. If highly flammable and highly dangerous, i dont think u will even get chance to see on shelves of Guardian for sale in a country like S'pore with so many rules, laws, regulations, DOs and DONTs. :bsmilie:

And dont forget medical grade alcohol in ur First-Aid kid is also highly flammable. Dont believe? try it at home ;p (But later caught fire...plz dont come find me :sticktong)

The worst, gas tank in ur house's kitchen is SUPER flammable. (But that one...dont try at home even if u dont believe :sweatsm: )

Ok, let go back to my topic....
Reason for suggestion to use 99% acetone is that it doesnt leave any mark on optic after dry up. But alcohol does. (just FYI, acetone from Guardian is not 99%....but about 77%. But I still find it ok to be used on optics.)

Coating in UV filter has been already mixed inside glass element while making. So, it's very unlikely coating will get damaged during cleaning filter optic's surface.
 

MrJelly

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Oct 28, 2008
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#6
Interesting! how about lenpen? .... I had a friend who stop using cloth after you ude len pen..
Srry I hav never used lenpen. I only want to share about optic cleaning by using acetone as I've been working in laser industry which involve a lot optic parts that have to be cleaned by acetone. :)
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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#8
Thanks for sharing, although I believe in normal cases it is not necessary to achieve the same grade of cleanliness than in laser industry. Dust on front element doesn't affect the picture (as long it's not forming a government already to negotiate with the approaching fungus colony) and rear elements are less prone to catch dust or fingerprints.
Also, certain things like salt from sea water I'd rather remove with water (best solvent for salt) than with acetone. So acetone would be 'last resort' for me. But good to know this option :)
 

Mar 13, 2007
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Atlanta, GA
#9
i would suggest against using acetone. its too volatile, and has a negative effect on plastics, rubbers and organic materials.

you dont need much to cause any harm, even some fumes are good to dmg some simple plastics.

i've tried several organic solvents, acetonitrile.. acetone.. butanol.. isopropanol.. ethanol.. and various mixtures such as 10% ACN in water, or 70% ethanol, my experience is that pure isopropanol is the best for cleaning lenses.

lens coatings are metal deposits, so dont try anything reactive on it, i.e. acid, or funny inorganic chemicals. else organic solvents are pretty ok.

what i'll do is that if there's any thing removable by water, i'll use a slightly damp kim wipe to clean, just damp enough to remove anything on the surface gently.

and if there are finger prints, oil marks, after the damp kim wipe cleaning, dab a bit of pure isopropanol and wipe gently, it will be spotless after that. works very well for the filters.. even the hard to clean hoyas

i've never tried cleaning any front element or rear element as of yet, as i dont touch these areas
 

MrJelly

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Oct 28, 2008
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#10
i would suggest against using acetone. its too volatile, and has a negative effect on plastics, rubbers and organic materials.

you dont need much to cause any harm, even some fumes are good to dmg some simple plastics.

i've tried several organic solvents, acetonitrile.. acetone.. butanol.. isopropanol.. ethanol.. and various mixtures such as 10% ACN in water, or 70% ethanol, my experience is that pure isopropanol is the best for cleaning lenses.

lens coatings are metal deposits, so dont try anything reactive on it, i.e. acid, or funny inorganic chemicals. else organic solvents are pretty ok.

what i'll do is that if there's any thing removable by water, i'll use a slightly damp kim wipe to clean, just damp enough to remove anything on the surface gently.

and if there are finger prints, oil marks, after the damp kim wipe cleaning, dab a bit of pure isopropanol and wipe gently, it will be spotless after that. works very well for the filters.. even the hard to clean hoyas

i've never tried cleaning any front element or rear element as of yet, as i dont touch these areas
Ok i agree on the point that u two point out. If can be cleaned by water, just use water.

But ok well if isopropanol can work also, just take my advice as another option. ;)
Cheers !
 

mrleech

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Mar 16, 2007
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#11
Can I ask a newbie question?
What about the inside? NSC? I found some dust on the internal surfaces of my lens.
 

MrJelly

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Oct 28, 2008
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#12
Can I ask a newbie question?
What about the inside? NSC? I found some dust on the internal surfaces of my lens.
inside lens compartment? well then...i guess...u hav to send to NSC as it involves opening up the lens.
 

ellery

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Jan 29, 2002
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#13
After many years of cleaning, the minute I started using the microfibre cleaning material I put all the liquid cleaners and tissues away. Even so the dried liquid spots, a little water vapour from a puff of breath and a quick wipe, it is gone. But different people have different need levels, if you feel you need to use liquid solvent and tissues to do the cleaning feel free to carry on.
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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#14
Can I ask a newbie question?
What about the inside? NSC? I found some dust on the internal surfaces of my lens.
There will always be dust. If you are "lucky" then NSC won't do much but charge you upon lens pick up. Stop worrying about dust, it's useless. We are surrounded by dust, period. Only a very few lenses are weather sealed or have internal focusing, all others will suck in dust (especially zoom lenses). Learn to live with it. The further away from the sensor the less you need to worry.
 

ellery

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#15
ok i got an pm for what brad and where to buy the microfibre cleaning cloth For the sake of all inquirying minds _ go dwon to cathay they sell these things> just remeber to shake out the cloth before cleaning to dislodge any particles that may be sticking to the cloth> Brand does not really matter but i would go for the ones wiith a smoother finish rather than the 3M wolly thread ones only that it would be less likely for dirt to be trapped in the cloth.
 

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theveed

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Apr 20, 2007
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#16
Daiso has some lens MF cloths that are very high in quality. I've worked with a lot of microfiber manufacturers in the past and the lens microfiber towels in Daiso are more than sufficient. All you need is a small spritz bottle of distilled water and a couple of MFs and you'll be good to go no matter where you are.
 

SNAG

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Jun 14, 2002
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#17
Just a curious question:

For alcohol, what types would be a good option? I remember reading somewhere that denatured alcohol works the best because of its high purity content.
 

Mar 13, 2007
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#18
Just a curious question:

For alcohol, what types would be a good option? I remember reading somewhere that denatured alcohol works the best because of its high purity content.
my preference, isopropyl alcohol. i've some HPLC grade with me.
 

Fotophilic

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Jun 18, 2006
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#19
acetone is quite a strong solvent. u may risk ur lens coatings.

u can buy those good cleaning solutions from cathay. Name is eclipse or sth like that, not very expensive when compared to lenses, i believe inside is methanol, correct me if i am wrong.

for dust, either ignore it or use blower to blow them off. NV USE UR MOUTH TO BLOW AWAY THE DUST!
 

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