Silhouette Photos


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stl

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#1
had the intention to take some silhouete photos... wat shd i take note of eg shutter speed? around what time is the best to take?
 

finkster

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Dawn or dusk, with the sun behind your subjects preferably. Hazy effects too if it's cloudy. This is for landscape or buildings, but same principle applies to people too. light from behind the subject(backlighting). Take your exposure reading from the bright part, set your aperture, and your pic should turn out roughly there. Experiment!
 

stl

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thanks finkster, understand the part whereby i take reading from a bright source. As for setting the aperture, do i set it to a larger number (smaller aperture) or to a smaller number (larger aperture)? i'm using SLR cam, so cannot experiment alot like digial cam...
 

finkster

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Generally speaking, a large f-stop is used, although it depends on how bright your back light is, distance of u to subject, time of day, how much of a silhoutte effect u want.....

Try to borrow a friend's digicam that is manual capable, experiment with it to have a rough idea of what settings u need to use to get the desired effect, then shoot it with your film SLR. It won't be exactly the same, but argaration on the first few tries.;)
 

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Hi...
If you want to shoot sillhouette, the most important thing is the metering of the main subject and the metering of the background should be at least 3 stop difference. Then take the suggested exposure of the background, recompose, and shoot!

This is one example (lousy scan, though):

http://www2.photosig.com/viewphoto.php?id=288485
 

FOOXX

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#8
Originally posted by romeobravo
Hi...
If you want to shoot sillhouette, the most important thing is the metering of the main subject and the metering of the background should be at least 3 stop difference. Then take the suggested exposure of the background, recompose, and shoot!

This is one example (lousy scan, though):

http://www2.photosig.com/viewphoto.php?id=288485
sorry ...... can explain which mode of the cam do u uze to meter hah ..... ???? ......

A mode or S mode ........ ?? .........

:D
 

FOOXX

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#10
Originally posted by romeobravo
I use manual metering spot metering on my camera.
Take spot meter to the brightest background. As easy as 1..2..3..

Check this out!
http://www.photosig.com/viewphoto.php?id=661475
hmmm ..... then how do u noe whether the subject n BK r at 3 stopz differencee ..... since u r uzing M mode ...... ?? ......

:D
 

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#11
Originally posted by FOOXX


hmmm ..... then how do u noe whether the subject n BK r at 3 stopz differencee ..... since u r uzing M mode ...... ?? ......

:D
then why don't you tell me first what's your understanding of manual metering ;)
 

FOOXX

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#12
Originally posted by romeobravo


then why don't you tell me first what's your understanding of manual metering ;)
hmmm ...... u set the shutter speed n aperture urzelf ..... if the exporzure iz correct then a spot in the viewfinder will light up (doeznt apply for manuzl cameraz) .........

anything elze ..... ?? .....

:D
 

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#13
Originally posted by FOOXX


hmmm ...... u set the shutter speed n aperture urzelf ..... if the exporzure iz correct then a spot in the viewfinder will light up (doeznt apply for manuzl cameraz) .........

anything elze ..... ?? .....

:D
Then why you ask? :D

Do what you explain just now to the background,
then using the same apperture, do it again on the subject.

Then you will noe if the difference is 3 stop or not.
 

FOOXX

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#14
Originally posted by romeobravo


Then why you ask? :D

Do what you explain just now to the background,
then using the same apperture, do it again on the subject.

Then you will noe if the difference is 3 stop or not.
hahahaa .... ok ok ok ..... pai seh pai seh .....

but do u mean uzing the same apperture or same shutter speed to meter on the subject ..... ?? ....

:D
 

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#15
Originally posted by FOOXX


hahahaa .... ok ok ok ..... pai seh pai seh .....

but do u mean uzing the same apperture or same shutter speed to meter on the subject ..... ?? ....

:D
I prefer using same apperture. because if your lens' maximum apperture is limited, sometime you will only see underexposed indicator on your camera without knowing the correct exposure.
 

FOOXX

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#16
Originally posted by romeobravo


I prefer using same apperture. because if your lens' maximum apperture is limited, sometime you will only see underexposed indicator on your camera without knowing the correct exposure.
ok ..... thankz ..... :thumbsup:

:D
 

suhaimig

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#17
Have you guys heard about compensation. Use them and lock focus on mid tone. Practise made perfect. You got AE mode on your camera, why don't you use them. One of the criteria why the amatuers or even professional spend huge of money on camera just because of the metering capability, why use manual.

Just my thought anyway.;)

Cheers.:cool:
 

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