Shutter speed burst shot problem


Jun 22, 2010
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Sengkang
#1
hello again guys, this time its abit more technical

I just tried to test out my shutter speed by using the continuous shooting mode and holding the shutter button down. by right it should have up to 170 maximum burst fire shots continuous at that speed, however, it doesnt go over 20.

Is there a problem?

thanks
 

limwhow

Senior Member
Jun 9, 2009
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Life revolves arOnd East Coast
#2
This is perfectly normal.
It is always limited by the buffer of the camera.
And it depends very much on what is your setting:

  • jpeg or RAW
  • Any High ISO noise reduction set
  • Any elaborate in-camera image processing
  • to a much lesser extent, the speed of your memory card
So it would be totally normal to have say, a continuous burst of 10+ shots after which the speed slows down as the memory buffer struggles to keep up.
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#3
hello again guys, this time its abit more technical

I just tried to test out my shutter speed by using the continuous shooting mode and holding the shutter button down. by right it should have up to 170 maximum burst fire shots continuous at that speed, however, it doesnt go over 20.

Is there a problem?

thanks
I believe the buffer is full, unable to write the data into memory card, try change your image setting to small jpg, normal compression.

hope this help.
 

Jun 22, 2010
223
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0
26
Sengkang
#4
is there a better brand of memory cards that can support this buffer problem.
i understand what you mean by the buffering time.
so if i want to take continuous shots of lets say 50, and i lower the file size, will the picture be pixelated or not as good?
 

limwhow

Senior Member
Jun 9, 2009
7,048
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Life revolves arOnd East Coast
#5
is there a better brand of memory cards that can support this buffer problem.
i understand what you mean by the buffering time.
so if i want to take continuous shots of lets say 50, and i lower the file size, will the picture be pixelated or not as good?
Personally, my experience is that the memory cards doesn't affect this burst mode too much as the speed of writing for most cards are very decent nowadays.
It still boils down to size and quality of image.
Thus if you really want fast and continuous bursts, you have to sacrifice image quality by selecting Jpeg of smaller size.
 

Jun 22, 2010
223
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0
26
Sengkang
#6
Personally, my experience is that the memory cards doesn't affect this burst mode too much as the speed of writing for most cards are very decent nowadays.
It still boils down to size and quality of image.
Thus if you really want fast and continuous bursts, you have to sacrifice image quality by selecting Jpeg of smaller size.
I believe the buffer is full, unable to write the data into memory card, try change your image setting to small jpg, normal compression.

hope this help.
This is perfectly normal.
It is always limited by the buffer of the camera.
And it depends very much on what is your setting:

  • jpeg or RAW
  • Any High ISO noise reduction set
  • Any elaborate in-camera image processing
  • to a much lesser extent, the speed of your memory card
So it would be totally normal to have say, a continuous burst of 10+ shots after which the speed slows down as the memory buffer struggles to keep up.

thanks guys, i just tried it again this time using the Small file settings with tt jigsaw shaped sign next to it, and i got up to 100 shots:D

thanks
 

iczazache

New Member
Mar 11, 2010
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www.flickr.com
#7
is there a better brand of memory cards that can support this buffer problem.
i understand what you mean by the buffering time.
so if i want to take continuous shots of lets say 50, and i lower the file size, will the picture be pixelated or not as good?
If i am not wrong, you can purchase a higher class memory card...but these are more expensive....
 

Reportage

Senior Member
Nov 24, 2008
5,785
2
0
#9
hello again guys, this time its abit more technical

I just tried to test out my shutter speed by using the continuous shooting mode and holding the shutter button down. by right it should have up to 170 maximum burst fire shots continuous at that speed, however, it doesnt go over 20.

Is there a problem?

thanks
check the manual or fine print just what conditions are required for the "by right it should have up to 170 maximum burst fire shots continuous at that speed" claim.

as for which card...i also dont know which one to recommend since manufacturers dont exactly put down the read/write speed of buffer to the memory card. so in all fairness, could be a 60mb/s card in a 15mb/s camera and vice versa.
 

Last edited:

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
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East
#10
Note that there are bottlenecks in all the various portions.

1. Size of buffer in camera.
2. Size of the file written to the card.
3. Write speed of the camera.
4. Write speed of the memory card.

All these will contribute to the maximum effective shooting speed in your camera. :)
 

jsprtan

New Member
May 12, 2010
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CEntral
#11
is there a better brand of memory cards that can support this buffer problem.
i understand what you mean by the buffering time.
so if i want to take continuous shots of lets say 50, and i lower the file size, will the picture be pixelated or not as good?
I think u should upgrade to a 7D. I did 50 shoots continuous at fine setup.
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#12
Jun 22, 2010
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Sengkang
#13
Not sure what brings you to that conclusion.
Here a benchmarking test with various cameras and memory cards. Select your camera and see for yourself.
http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/multi_page.asp?cid=6007
Hello again octarine,

think we had alittle misunderstanding in the past post, may be its just hard to tell the tone of a person by type writen communications, so yah hope there are no hard feelings.

Any way, I'm not too sure what is the difference between a flash card and an sd card, from what i assume, the higer end cameras like the canon 50D and the 7D uses flash cards while the 450D and 500D uses sd cards, so by that i sorta assumes tt the flash cards are used for higher end shooting and therefore might be a higher end form of data storage :D

but yah, i will look into that link

thanks :D
 

daredevil123

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Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,657
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lil red dot
#14
Hello again octarine,

think we had alittle misunderstanding in the past post, may be its just hard to tell the tone of a person by type writen communications, so yah hope there are no hard feelings.

Any way, I'm not too sure what is the difference between a flash card and an sd card, from what i assume, the higer end cameras like the canon 50D and the 7D uses flash cards while the 450D and 500D uses sd cards, so by that i sorta assumes tt the flash cards are used for higher end shooting and therefore might be a higher end form of data storage :D

but yah, i will look into that link

thanks :D
SD card is a flash (memory) card.
CF (compact flash) is also a flash (memory) card.

Both type of media has speed ratings associated with different classes/generations. One cannot say a CF card will always be faster than a SD card. Even CF cards have several iterations: CF, CF-II, CF-microdrive, UDMA. And SD too: SD, SDHC, SDXC.

You really have to compare apples to apples. Some SD cards are faster than some CF cards. And some CF cards are faster than SD cards.
 

Last edited:

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#15
think we had alittle misunderstanding in the past post, may be its just hard to tell the tone of a person by type writen communications, so yah hope there are no hard feelings.
No worries, I'm cool. Yeah, I know I sound harsh at times, never acquired much skills in sugar coating words :) But I'll try.

Any way, I'm not too sure what is the difference between a flash card and an sd card, from what i assume, the higer end cameras like the canon 50D and the 7D uses flash cards while the 450D and 500D uses sd cards, so by that i sorta assumes tt the flash cards are used for higher end shooting and therefore might be a higher end form of data storage
Hope this link gives more inside view: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_memory_cards
Basically, the raw material is the same. The difference is the interface and certain other features (DRM, write protection, interface speed) etc. Also, there is a difference how those cards are addressed at system level. My guess: since SD / SDHC are typically used in many consumer devices (handphones etc.) they were introduced into the consumer models recently. My old 350D uses CF cards, no SD. CF remains the storage for professional usage. Personally, I prefer the bigger CF cards over the flimsy little SD cards.
Finally, what matter for your problem is the interface speed of card and camera. The weakest link (or here: the slowest link) defines the overall speed.
 

jsprtan

New Member
May 12, 2010
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#16
You really have to compare apples to apples. Some SD cards are faster than some CF cards. And some CF cards are faster than SD cards.
Hi Bro daredevil, thanks for your tips on EV compensation.

Basically, the raw material
:nono:The raw material is not the same, very different. First we have to understand a few computer terms
1. Bus speed -the speed of data transfer through a system
2. byte and bits - Where usually 8 / 16 / 32 bit = 1 byte depending on your system.

:nono:The raw material is not the same as the whole architecture is different and if u flip the 2 card over u be able to tell the difference. SD have 9 to 11 connections pin whereas CF has 50 Pins.

SO if we have a CF and a SD card that share the same bus speed, the SD card can only transfer 4 bit compared to 16 bit on the CF card for each signal. This is limited by the number of pins. Due to this limitation, CF will be faster. This is why all higher end camera that required faster speed runs solely one CF card.

Why SD card is more popular on other electronic device, well it is also pretty obvious. The size, it is smaller which is critical for hand phone and small MP3 player. The other reason is that alot of handphone are still on the 8 bit architect so they don't need 16 bit.
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
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lil red dot
#17
Hi Bro daredevil, thanks for your tips on EV compensation.



:nono:The raw material is not the same, very different. First we have to understand a few computer terms
1. Bus speed -the speed of data transfer through a system
2. byte and bits - Where usually 8 / 16 / 32 bit = 1 byte depending on your system.

:nono:The raw material is not the same as the whole architecture is different and if u flip the 2 card over u be able to tell the difference. SD have 9 to 11 connections pin whereas CF has 50 Pins.

SO if we have a CF and a SD card that share the same bus speed, the SD card can only transfer 4 bit compared to 16 bit on the CF card for each signal. This is limited by the number of pins. Due to this limitation, CF will be faster. This is why all higher end camera that required faster speed runs solely one CF card.

Why SD card is more popular on other electronic device, well it is also pretty obvious. The size, it is smaller which is critical for hand phone and small MP3 player. The other reason is that alot of handphone are still on the 8 bit architect so they don't need 16 bit.
They are all semi-conductor. But the architecture of the chip are very different from generation to generation.
 

ahbian

Senior Member
May 23, 2006
2,467
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0
#18
Any way, I'm not too sure what is the difference between a flash card and an sd card, from what i assume, the higer end cameras like the canon 50D and the 7D uses flash cards while the 450D and 500D uses sd cards, so by that i sorta assumes tt the flash cards are used for higher end shooting and therefore might be a higher end form of data storage :D
Without going into the specifics of whether CF or SD cards are faster (its depends which one you are comparing actually), just a slight note that your generalisation that flash card are used for higher end models is not really accurate. The 300D, 350D and 400D uses flash cards.
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,516
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Pasir Ris
#19
The raw material is not the same, very different.
Both is flash memory, right?

First we have to understand a few computer terms
1. Bus speed -the speed of data transfer through a system
2. byte and bits - Where usually 8 / 16 / 32 bit = 1 byte depending on your system.
The raw material is not the same as the whole architecture is different and if u flip the 2 card over u be able to tell the difference. SD have 9 to 11 connections pin whereas CF has 50 Pins.
SO if we have a CF and a SD card that share the same bus speed, the SD card can only transfer 4 bit compared to 16 bit on the CF card for each signal. This is limited by the number of pins. Due to this limitation, CF will be faster. This is why all higher end camera that required faster speed runs solely one CF card.
This is exactly what I described (admittedly, quite briefly) in:
The difference is the interface and certain other features (DRM, write protection, interface speed) etc. Also, there is a difference how those cards are addressed at system level.
 

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