Should we mention the camera settings while posting pictures here?


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#1
I know it may not seem of much importance, but at least for the newbies...

1. Its easier to shoot pictures when you see someone else's pic of the same scene and you have a rough idea of what ISO, shutter speed, and aperture setting he or she has used. Granted the likelihood of producing that exact same photo again even with the same setting is close to nil but still..seems like a fairly good idea.

2. My professor has this habit of telling us where we went wrong with the picture just by looking at the settings. Maybe the more experienced clubsnappers can help the amateur ones by doing the same?

Just my thoughts...doesn't have to be compulsory. I just know that I will be posting the settings with my pics henceforth.
Was only thinking how much effective it would be if others did the same, after all, this is a photography forum.
 

May 1, 2007
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#2
2. My professor has this habit of telling us where we went wrong with the picture just by looking at the settings. Maybe the more experienced clubsnappers can help the amateur ones by doing the same?
I am not sure if you have misrepresented your professor.

Assuming you did not, there just might be other "professors" who may not agree with your professor.

It is like the professor can tell you what is wrong with your essay by looking at the way you typed that essay.
 

Sep 8, 2004
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#3
2. My professor has this habit of telling us where we went wrong with the picture just by looking at the settings. Maybe the more experienced clubsnappers can help the amateur ones by doing the same?
Sorry to say, your professor's advice, as quoted, is wrong. And it is dangerously misguiding. Settings do not take a measure of composition, color coordination, subject matter, leading lines etc.

In all fairness, settings are markedly useful if you are doing images involving long exposure, or silky softness of water flowing down a stream (to name a few examples).

It's better to get a good critique on image flaws through qualitative means, and through human criticism, because human reactions make or break the reaction/opinion/effectiveness of an image most of the time.

Are you by any chance in ADM?
 

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Headshotzx

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Dec 14, 2007
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#4
The settings could show that I'm shooting at ISO400, f/8 and 1/500s in a dark room with people and no flash.

The photograph might show a great work of art that's carefully framed, purposely underexposed for the mood, and with a powerful message behind it.

People post settings with the photograph for critique to tell others what settings they used, and, in the case where the photograph is technically flawed and hurts the artistic element, the the critics can suggest a different setting.
 

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zac08

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Feb 21, 2005
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#5
I know it may not seem of much importance, but at least for the newbies...

1. Its easier to shoot pictures when you see someone else's pic of the same scene and you have a rough idea of what ISO, shutter speed, and aperture setting he or she has used. Granted the likelihood of producing that exact same photo again even with the same setting is close to nil but still..seems like a fairly good idea.

2. My professor has this habit of telling us where we went wrong with the picture just by looking at the settings. Maybe the more experienced clubsnappers can help the amateur ones by doing the same?

Just my thoughts...doesn't have to be compulsory. I just know that I will be posting the settings with my pics henceforth.
Was only thinking how much effective it would be if others did the same, after all, this is a photography forum.
Only if you need to know if your settings could have been tweaked in a slightly different way. Each shooter have their own idea on how to expose for a certain scene and it also depends on the gear used.

For e.g. Nikon tends to underexpose scenes and as such you may wish to dial a positive 0.7 ev to compensate if you are shooting in Jpeg and unable to recover in RAW conversion later.

Alternatively, I understand my camera and the matrix metering it shows me at night and I should underexpose it by 1 stop to get what I see in my eyes to match what I would get in my camera. Each camera and user do things differently. We can't say which may be the BEST or which would work in all situations.

BUT we can suggest that in that particular scene when you have exposed it at that setting, mebbe a slightly different set of settings may have helped. :)
 

estel

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Jul 17, 2006
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#6
2. My professor has this habit of telling us where we went wrong with the picture just by looking at the settings.
it depends.

you don't need a professor to tell apart camera shake due to slow shutter speed and out of focus blur.

on the other hand, could the professor tell apart the wrong exposure due to wrong manual settings and wrong exposure due to auto exposure + wrong exposure compensation?

could he tell the difference between wrong white balance with tungstan light and flash bouncing from a yellow ceiling?
 

Kit

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Jan 19, 2002
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#7
I know it may not seem of much importance, but at least for the newbies...

1. Its easier to shoot pictures when you see someone else's pic of the same scene and you have a rough idea of what ISO, shutter speed, and aperture setting he or she has used. Granted the likelihood of producing that exact same photo again even with the same setting is close to nil but still..seems like a fairly good idea.

2. My professor has this habit of telling us where we went wrong with the picture just by looking at the settings. Maybe the more experienced clubsnappers can help the amateur ones by doing the same?

Just my thoughts...doesn't have to be compulsory. I just know that I will be posting the settings with my pics henceforth.
Was only thinking how much effective it would be if others did the same, after all, this is a photography forum.
You are better off understanding what ISO, shutter speed, and aperture settings do and apply this knowledge to take a photo. There isn't much point asking for settings for every single photo you come across, its like asking for a fish from everyone you meet. Learn to catch your own.
 

attap seed

Senior Member
Feb 16, 2006
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#8
angle, composition, lighting, subject etc are more important than camera settings.

for most non-critical shots, it dun matter if i shoot at iso100 or 800, at f8 or 11, at 1/250 or 1/500.
 

unseen

Senior Member
Dec 14, 2004
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#9
For beginners, it's very to tell what's wrong from just looking at the settings. Nevermind the composition, the colours etc..

Most of the advice here given is based on the premise that the general exposure, etc is all acceptable.

I've seen dSLR users nowadays shooting at ISO 100, F8, 1/200 in the dark because they want less noise, sharper pictures, and high shutter speed. *shrug*

Of course, if the prof gives a theme or a particular style to shoot, and people use funny settings, it's immediately possible to tell what's wrong and what's not.

Without qualifying the circumstances the prof made his comments in, it's impossible to say if he's right or wrong.

Generally speaking, looking at beginners most people can usually tell what's right, what's wrong from the settings.
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#10
the light is always different.

there are no magic settings - better to gain a strong fundamental grounding in understanding how the parameters of exposure affect exposure and other things. that will take you a long way rather than looking at people's settings.
 

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