should i buy a flash or 50mm??


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#1
guys.. going to buy 50mm 1.8f
but i come to thinking that flash is a importent item too..
i do mostly landscape.. to me both is not as importent for a wide angle.. like 10-20 sigma..
but i do like to do some protrite sometime..
or just keep my $$ and use my 18-135mm for the rest of the day..till i get enough $$ for 10-20 sigma???
or any idea
 

JerrySH

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Oct 15, 2007
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#2
well, it depends on wat ure going to do most of the time.
since u do mostly landscape, i dun think u'll need a flash tt soon.
 

JerrySH

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Oct 15, 2007
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#4
lol, most ppl have bbb virus including me, but i often remind myself which are the more impt ones to get 1st.
will more or less help =)
 

LittleWolf

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Jan 23, 2005
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#5
guys.. going to buy 50mm 1.8f
but i come to thinking that flash is a importent item too..
I might overlook something, but for conventional landscapes I believe a flash is just about the most useless piece of equipment. Unless you do a bounce flash on the clouds to evenly illuminate the picturesque mountains in the distance :). For portraits, I guess it can be useful, but it will likely take a bit more than a single camera-mounted flash for good lighting.

As for a 50 mm f/1.8 lens, the f/1.8 aperture certainly isn't what one would typically use for landscapes. For portraits it could come in quite handy, though, and it is also useful as a general "available light" (mainly indoor) lens. Exactly how useful depends pretty much on your own taste/style, I don't think anyone can help you there.

My general sentiment is to keep things simple. Less is often more.
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#6
I might overlook something, but for conventional landscapes I believe a flash is just about the most useless piece of equipment. Unless you do a bounce flash on the clouds to evenly illuminate the picturesque mountains in the distance :). For portraits, I guess it can be useful, but it will likely take a bit more than a single camera-mounted flash for good lighting.

As for a 50 mm f/1.8 lens, the f/1.8 aperture certainly isn't what one would typically use for landscapes. For portraits it could come in quite handy, though, and it is also useful as a general "available light" (mainly indoor) lens. Exactly how useful depends pretty much on your own taste/style, I don't think anyone can help you there.

My general sentiment is to keep things simple. Less is often more.
best advice so far. may I add: working with less things, you will learn more
 

Kermitfm

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Mar 10, 2007
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#8
My general sentiment is to keep things simple. Less is often more.
Well said LittleWolf. We should not be looking for something to buy. The need should drive the action if you know what I mean. I prefer to move around with as little equipment as possible so I can be more mobile and concentrate on the composition. Sometimes the constraints may cause you to think creatively. If you shoot a lot and find that you are missing those shots you want, then it is time to buy. e.g. If you keep missing those shots because of low lighting, then the flash is for you. Cheers....
 

stubertsg

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Oct 11, 2007
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#9
Pai sey, jack ya thread alittle
When I compare shots done with my Kit lens vs those with good lens. Argh...temptation!
 

alternatve

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Dec 30, 2006
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#10
Stop dreaming and start shooting.

Most of the time, it's us users that need to improve, not the equipment... :p

Samuel
 

#11
Stop dreaming and start shooting.

Most of the time, it's us users that need to improve, not the equipment... :p

Samuel
This usually apply to 99.99% of the folks who are into photography in general heheh...

I remember years ago when I first took up photography with a Nikon FG. I only had a 50mm lens and that was all I had to shoot with for more then a year. It was a good period as it build up my foundation on photography not just technique but you also learn the fundamental of what expose and lighting is all about, yo ulearn the limitation and how far you can push your worst or best gear to produce the best images. And then there is the creativity that comes through once you have master all the basic of photography. If anyone took the time to just take their camera out and just shoot, take notes, take the trouble to work with the limitations of your gear..it is only then would you appreciate more what using a higher grade equipment would be like.

Trust me when I say, I have seen people with the money to buy very impressive gear to go walk about but when you look at what they shoot..you just have to shake your head and wonder why bother to waste those money to buy gear but not waste the time to learn to shoot better. And in these day and age of digital..you guys are alot lucky them old timers like me. For us to experiment the only BBB virus we have goes to films and developing prints!!! Get over the penis envy thingy and just get on with shooting. Just because you have seen some great shots in real life or online taken with great lens well look abit hard and you will also find great shots taken with less then average camera gear and sometime you get so blinded by your impression of the gear you...you forgot to see the story or the creativity in the shot. And another thing..before you think great gear takes great shots...if you surf around more you will also find..even the best pros shoot like hundreds of frame and only can find one great shot to show the world while they burn the rest that are not.

So don't just look at a Nikon or Canon Lens catalog and you see all those great shots they did with a 50mm or a flash-fill shot and then tell yourself..wah I like that...I should get a flash to do that as it look so easy...because the ad copytext say so? What effort, time and numerous shots it took to get the right photo to demostrate that lens or flash's capability is something you might not have known.

Stick with what you have. Learn to use it well. Learn to know your gear to the point that you can do camera setting and composing your shot fast and at the same time. If you can't do that, even the more expensive gear will not help you as they are just as complicated to use. Expensive gear may mean better quality reproduction but it does not get easier to use and at times it is even harder. Why? Becasue you are adding more variable to the shot. If you are already over burden with grappling with the fundemental of a shot, add the flash equation into it just makes matters worst for example.

As someone else here say....keep it simple. Why complicate things so much to the point that you end up hating the hobby and you find that maybe all this shooting thing is not all that is it claimed to be. I have seen burnt outs like that. And we have photographers who love people like that as we get to buy their gear cheap when they give up the hobby. heheh...

This is not a rant in which I am saying you should not buy stuff if you want to, can afford to or need to. It is about telling you or anyone who is into this hobby that you need to pace yourself. The learning process takes time (a long time if you really serious) and there is no short cut even if you have the best gear.
 

MrWanz

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Feb 28, 2008
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#13
sigma 10-20mm around $900+ right if i'm not mistaken...Planing to get one too but mst save $$$ 1st..
 

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