Shortening learning curve of mastering the settings


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tengcc

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Jul 31, 2006
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#1
Bros, newbie here requesting information whether is there any website or books that specifically let me know the various types of settings for taking different pictures, ie

Portrait, sports, macro (insects, flowers), fireworks, scnery, landscape etc etc)
ideal ISO
ideal Aperture
ideal Shutter speed
ideal EV compensation
alot more things to pay attention to etc etc.

Currently, I am learning the hard way of switching blindly the settings and trying to figure out whether I am doing the right thing as most of the pictures looks the same to me on the LCD screen even though I change the dial from portriat to sports, to night scenery on my D50. I am so confused and I need help from the expert. Thanks in advance :dunno:
 

ExplorerZ

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Jan 9, 2006
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#2
tengcc said:
Bros, newbie here requesting information whether is there any website or books that specifically let me know the various types of settings for taking different pictures, ie

Portrait, sports, macro (insects, flowers), fireworks, scnery, landscape etc etc)
ideal ISO
ideal Aperture
ideal Shutter speed
ideal EV compensation
alot more things to pay attention to etc etc.

Currently, I am learning the hard way of switching blindly the settings and trying to figure out whether I am doing the right thing as most of the pictures looks the same to me on the LCD screen even though I change the dial from portriat to sports, to night scenery on my D50. I am so confused and I need help from the expert. Thanks in advance :dunno:
ISO - As low as possible... unless for creative purpose like coverting to B/W photos
Aperture - Depend on how deep/shallow you want your DOF to be
Shutter - usually not a important factor as long as it is not too slow to make your pics turn out blur. But can also be used to get water effect(sharp and crisp or sliky smooth), panning(slow shutter with subject sharp while background blurred)...etc
EV Compensation - Used mainly on tricky lighting condition...

Conclusion - There is no such word as IDEAL... it all depends on the effect you want...
 

tengcc

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Jul 31, 2006
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#4
ExplorerZ said:
ISO - As low as possible... unless for creative purpose like coverting to B/W photos
Aperture - Depend on how deep/shallow you want your DOF to be
Shutter - usually not a important factor as long as it is not too slow to make your pics turn out blur. But can also be used to get water effect(sharp and crisp or sliky smooth), panning(slow shutter with subject sharp while background blurred)...etc
EV Compensation - Used mainly on tricky lighting condition...

Conclusion - There is no such word as IDEAL... it all depends on the effect you want...
Thanks for yr advice. Currently, what I am doing is to browse through the internet looking
out for sample pictures using D50, 15-55mm kit lens, copying down the settings and using the same settings for same kind of pictures but the end result still not as good compared. Hmmm:dunno:
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
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#5
One way... practise in all light conditions...
 

ExplorerZ

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Jan 9, 2006
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hkchew03.deviantart.com
#6
tengcc said:
Thanks for yr advice. Currently, what I am doing is to browse through the internet looking
out for sample pictures using D50, 15-55mm kit lens, copying down the settings and using the same settings for same kind of pictures but the end result still not as good compared. Hmmm:dunno:
why do you want to copy? just go out and shoot and test out... slowly you will understand how all those setting work
 

blazer_workz

Senior Member
May 8, 2006
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ClubSNAP Community
#7
Learn how exposure works first, then learn how to meter..there is no one setting for the same kind of situation..it varies greatly on the available light..so no point knowing other peoples setting.

tips:
1.) learn to shoot in Aperture priority mode, varies the aperture and see how the shutter speed changes. Check the difference in picture produce by different aperture.
2.) learn to shoot in Shutter priority mode, varies the shutter speed and see how the aperture changes. Check the difference in picture produce by different shutter speed.
3.) by owning a dslr the fun part is to shoot under your control..not the camera think for you, so its not advisable to use those in built program modes(ie. portrait, night, macro, etc.)

After u r comfortable with Av/Tv mode, u can try shooting in manual mode. ;)
 

tengcc

New Member
Jul 31, 2006
165
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#8
blazer_workz said:
Learn how exposure works first, then learn how to meter..there is no one setting for the same kind of situation..it varies greatly on the available light..so no point knowing other peoples setting.

tips:
1.) learn to shoot in Aperture priority mode, varies the aperture and see how the shutter speed changes. Check the difference in picture produce by different aperture.
2.) learn to shoot in Shutter priority mode, varies the shutter speed and see how the aperture changes. Check the difference in picture produce by different shutter speed.
3.) by owning a dslr the fun part is to shoot under your control..not the camera think for you, so its not advisable to use those in built program modes(ie. portrait, night, macro, etc.)

After u r comfortable with Av/Tv mode, u can try shooting in manual mode. ;)
Thanks Blazer for yr good advice and that was what I am looking for.

Cheers
:thumbsup:
 

ortega

Moderator
Staff member
Nov 2, 2004
23,694
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Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
#9
there are no ideal settings
it all depends on your scene and the light available there.

learn exposure first then you won't be changing settings blindly.
 

#10
tengcc said:
Thanks for yr advice. Currently, what I am doing is to browse through the internet looking
out for sample pictures using D50, 15-55mm kit lens, copying down the settings and using the same settings for same kind of pictures but the end result still not as good compared. Hmmm:dunno:
Every lighting condition and environment is different that's why copying the settings might not reproduced the same photos. You can only use the settings as guidelines. Composition plays a huge part in how the photos turn out.

The good thing about digital is that you can do some initial reviews, change the settings and shoot again. Practise more with different S/A. Lots of books at the library as you are aware of. Use those examples to expand your horizon and creative space, so that you could see what you want out of the photos that you take.

I am also using D50 with kit lens too. I usually experiment with P or A. Sometimes Manual when I have the time.
 

Leonardo

New Member
Mar 14, 2006
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East Coast
#11
Singer high said:
This book is highly recommended - Understanding Exposure

Borders and Kino selling. Not sure if library has.

I agree with you. This book is really useful. Peterson explain the concepts in a simple way easy to understand and is a pleasure to read it. Not to much use of "tech words", it's like he try to get the interest of the reader and not to impress with the ability to talk about difficult concepts.
Nice one:thumbsup:
 

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