Shooting with Sunglass


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sin77

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Nov 28, 2004
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#1
Those who got sunglasses, do you wear them when you go shooting? Does it affect your photo exposure? How do you overcome it?
 

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Nov 25, 2005
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North
#3
Those who got sunglasses, do you wear them when you go shooting? Does it affect your photo exposure? How do you overcome it?
1. i dun shoot with sunglass on....unable to put the VF against the sunglass properly. :cool:

2. photo exposure not affected coz i dun put the sunglass in front of the lens... :bsmilie: so the camera metering is not affected. unless you discard photos due to reviewing the photos in your sunglass....

3. all problems with the sunglass can be overcome by simply removing it....haha :sweatsm:
 

Blur Shadow

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2005
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#4
I did that when I was in Europe... Sun was really bright there... Just rely on the histogram. Or if you're really paranoid, shoot RAW... The camera metering is rarely more than 1 stop off...
 

Jun 25, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#5
the camera records what it sees through the lens, not what i see through my sunglasses. there's a exposure meter in the camera for you to refer to, and there's always the histogram afterwards.
 

Reportage

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Nov 24, 2008
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#6
Those who got sunglasses, do you wear them when you go shooting? Does it affect your photo exposure? How do you overcome it?
Not that i notice...but if you want to try something interesting, shoot through a sunglass.
 

boyboy

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Oct 15, 2007
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#8
Those who got sunglasses, do you wear them when you go shooting? Does it affect your photo exposure? How do you overcome it?
for me, things get a bit tricky. i wear transitions :bsmilie:

however, i don't delete photos which are only slightly underexposed. if i'm shooting in broad daylight, i'd be shooting at ISO200. can easily recover slight underexposure :)

if the pic is severely underexposed, then sunglasses or not, should be pretty obvious
 

gymak90

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Jan 5, 2008
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#9
Actually it's quite simple..

If what you see on your camera LCD is what you see through your sunglasses, then it's ok. :D
 

Yew Fai

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Feb 26, 2007
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Punggol
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#10
yep, i know what you are referring to. was shooting at sentosa around 11+ am and i was wearing transition-lens ... for a while there under the hot glare of the sun (there was no shade in place on the beach, and i need both hands just to support the weight of my camera), the lcd showed me a totally black and white world ... i started deleting a few, thinking that i was probably shooting the model against a very harsh light with my speedlight failing me somehow, resulting in a very dark model against a bright background. then i checked the histogram and realised it actually wasnt the case. when i got a chance to review the photos again later in a more shady place and when my eyes have recovered from the harsh light, i realised the colours and exposure were actually ok.

i think you just have to rely on your exposure metering when you take the photos during such situations. you can verify with the histogram to confirm.
 

ex0rzist

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Mar 9, 2005
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#11
yep, i know what you are referring to. was shooting at sentosa around 11+ am and i was wearing transition-lens ... for a while there under the hot glare of the sun (there was no shade in place on the beach, and i need both hands just to support the weight of my camera), the lcd showed me a totally black and white world ... i started deleting a few, thinking that i was probably shooting the model against a very harsh light with my speedlight failing me somehow, resulting in a very dark model against a bright background. then i checked the histogram and realised it actually wasnt the case. when i got a chance to review the photos again later in a more shady place and when my eyes have recovered from the harsh light, i realised the colours and exposure were actually ok.

i think you just have to rely on your exposure metering when you take the photos during such situations. you can verify with the histogram to confirm.

This happened to me too......
 

Blur Shadow

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2005
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#12
yep, i know what you are referring to. was shooting at sentosa around 11+ am and i was wearing transition-lens ... for a while there under the hot glare of the sun (there was no shade in place on the beach, and i need both hands just to support the weight of my camera), the lcd showed me a totally black and white world ... i started deleting a few, thinking that i was probably shooting the model against a very harsh light with my speedlight failing me somehow, resulting in a very dark model against a bright background. then i checked the histogram and realised it actually wasnt the case. when i got a chance to review the photos again later in a more shady place and when my eyes have recovered from the harsh light, i realised the colours and exposure were actually ok.

i think you just have to rely on your exposure metering when you take the photos during such situations. you can verify with the histogram to confirm.
Delete already still can recover leh... Haha!
 

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