Shooting Sunrise...


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Shib

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Kind of interesting, do you need special filter to shoot that? If the sun is too hot, it might fried the photo sensors.
 

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UStime

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#5
Originally posted by Shib
Kind of interesting, do you need special filter to shoot that? If the sun is too hot, it might fried the photo sensors.
No lah... where do you guys get this idea from? I've heard of this passing around for some time.
 

Shib

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Originally posted by UStime
No lah... where do you guys get this idea from? I've heard of this passing around for some time.
This is for real, no joke.

Unless you are shooting at very fast shutter speed, the sun can easily burnt out your photo sensors. The photo elements are as sensitive like your eyes. Confirmation from Canon.
 

rack

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#7
Not just the sensors, don't forget your lens.

I was once shooting a solar eclipse and used filters, etc. Obviously there was a lot of waiting time in between shots. After the shoot, my shutter curtains were fine, only problem is the lubricant ot somethign in the lens melted, thus staining the inner elements....

Although, I don;t think u'll have this problem at sunrise, sunset where the sun isn;t so strong....

Which has a better view depends on time of year .....
 

U

UStime

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#8
Originally posted by Shib
This is for real, no joke.

Unless you are shooting at very fast shutter speed, the sun can easily burnt out your photo sensors. The photo elements are as sensitive like your eyes. Confirmation from Canon.
Really? How come the manual doesn't mention anything about this? Anyway, quite subjective... how fast a shutter speed is considered safe? And also is it the heat or light from the sun that actually damages the sensor?

I've actually been shooting many sunsets/sunrises on my D30. Nothing bad happens so far. *touch wood*
 

Prismatic

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#9
Neutral density filters are useful, to prevent bleaching of light in the picture, loss of details in the highlights.
 

ChObiTs

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#11
Does this appy to sun light onli ... electric lightings ... for example if u pt direstly at a lamp n shoot?
 

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